Advanced search
1 file | 1.25 MB Add to list

Assessing basic life support skills without an instructor: is it possible?

Nicolas Mpotos (UGent) , Bram De Wever (UGent) , Martin Valcke (UGent) and Koenraad Monsieurs (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Background : Current methods to assess Basic Life Support skills (BLS; chest compressions and ventilations) require the presence of an instructor. This is time-consuming and comports instructor bias. Since BLS skills testing is a routine activity, it is potentially suitable for automation. We developed a fully automated BLS testing station without instructor by using innovative software linked to a training manikin. The goal of our study was to investigate the feasibility of adequate testing (effectiveness) within the shortest period of time (efficiency). Methods : As part of a randomised controlled trial investigating different compression depth training strategies, 184 medicine students received an individual appointment for a retention test six months after training. An interactive FlashTM (Adobe Systems Inc., USA) user interface was developed, to guide the students through the testing procedure after login, while Skills StationTM software (Laerdal Medical, Norway) automatically recorded compressions and ventilations and their duration (“time on task”). In a subgroup of 29 students the room entrance and exit time was registered to assess efficiency. To obtain a qualitative insight of the effectiveness, student’s perceptions about the instructional organisation and about the usability of the fully automated testing station were surveyed. Results : During testing there was incomplete data registration in two students and one student performed compressions only. The average time on task for the remaining 181 students was three minutes (SD 0.5). In the subgroup, the average overall time spent in the testing station was 7.5 minutes (SD 1.4). Mean scores were 5.3/6 (SD 0.5, range 4.0-6.0) for instructional organisation and 5.0/6 (SD 0.61, range 3.1-6.0) for usability. Students highly appreciated the automated testing procedure. Conclusions : Our automated testing station was an effective and efficient method to assess BLS skills in medicine students. Instructional organisation and usability were judged to be very good. This method enables future formative assessment and certification procedures to be carried out without instructor involvement. Trial registration B67020097543
Keywords
Basic Life Support, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Automated testing, Self-directed learning

Downloads

  • Mpotos 2012 BMH 12 a58.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.25 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Mpotos, Nicolas, Bram De Wever, Martin Valcke, et al. “Assessing Basic Life Support Skills Without an Instructor: Is It Possible?” BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION 12 (2012): n. pag. Print.
APA
Mpotos, Nicolas, De Wever, B., Valcke, M., & Monsieurs, K. (2012). Assessing basic life support skills without an instructor: is it possible? BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION, 12.
Chicago author-date
Mpotos, Nicolas, Bram De Wever, Martin Valcke, and Koenraad Monsieurs. 2012. “Assessing Basic Life Support Skills Without an Instructor: Is It Possible?” Bmc Medical Education 12.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Mpotos, Nicolas, Bram De Wever, Martin Valcke, and Koenraad Monsieurs. 2012. “Assessing Basic Life Support Skills Without an Instructor: Is It Possible?” Bmc Medical Education 12.
Vancouver
1.
Mpotos N, De Wever B, Valcke M, Monsieurs K. Assessing basic life support skills without an instructor: is it possible? BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION. 2012;12.
IEEE
[1]
N. Mpotos, B. De Wever, M. Valcke, and K. Monsieurs, “Assessing basic life support skills without an instructor: is it possible?,” BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION, vol. 12, 2012.
@article{2971141,
  abstract     = {Background : Current methods to assess Basic Life Support skills (BLS; chest compressions and ventilations) require the presence of an instructor. This is time-consuming and comports instructor bias. Since BLS skills testing is a routine activity, it is potentially suitable for automation. We developed a fully automated BLS testing station without instructor by using innovative software linked to a training manikin. The goal of our study was to investigate the feasibility of adequate testing (effectiveness) within the shortest period of time (efficiency).
Methods : As part of a randomised controlled trial investigating different compression depth training strategies, 184 medicine students received an individual appointment for a retention test six months after training. An interactive FlashTM (Adobe Systems Inc., USA) user interface was developed, to guide the students through the testing procedure after login, while Skills StationTM software (Laerdal Medical, Norway) automatically recorded compressions and ventilations and their duration (“time on task”). In a subgroup of 29 students the room entrance and exit time was registered to assess efficiency. To obtain a qualitative insight of the effectiveness, student’s perceptions about the instructional organisation and about the usability of the fully automated testing station were surveyed.
Results : During testing there was incomplete data registration in two students and one student performed compressions only. The average time on task for the remaining 181 students was three minutes (SD 0.5). In the subgroup, the average overall time spent in the testing station was 7.5 minutes (SD 1.4). Mean scores were 5.3/6 (SD 0.5, range 4.0-6.0) for instructional organisation and 5.0/6 (SD 0.61, range 3.1-6.0) for usability. Students highly appreciated the automated testing procedure.
Conclusions : Our automated testing station was an effective and efficient method to assess BLS skills in medicine students. Instructional organisation and usability were judged to be very good. This method enables future formative assessment and certification procedures to be carried out without instructor involvement.
Trial registration B67020097543},
  articleno    = {58},
  author       = {Mpotos, Nicolas and De Wever, Bram and Valcke, Martin and Monsieurs, Koenraad},
  issn         = {1472-6920},
  journal      = {BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION},
  keywords     = {Basic Life Support,Cardiopulmonary resuscitation,Automated testing,Self-directed learning},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {Assessing basic life support skills without an instructor: is it possible?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6920-12-58},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2012},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: