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Identification of pathways, gene networks, and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

Jana Asselman UGent, Dieter De Coninck UGent, Stephen Glaholt, John K Colbourne, Colin Janssen UGent, Joseph R Shaw and Karel De Schamphelaere UGent (2012) ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY. 46(15). p.8448-8457
abstract
Although cyanobacteria produce a wide range of natural toxins that impact aquatic organisms, food webs, and water quality, the mechanisms of toxicity are still insufficiently understood. Here, we implemented a whole-genome expression microarray to identify pathways, gene networks, and paralogous gene families responsive to Microcystis stress in Daphnia pulex. Therefore, neonates of a sensitive isolate were given a diet contaminated with Microcystis to contrast with those given a control diet for 16 days. The microarray revealed 2247 differentially expressed (DE) genes (7.6% of the array) in response to Microcystis, of which 17% are lineage-specific (i.e., these genes have no detectable homology to any other gene in currently available databases) and 49% are gene duplicates (paralogues). We identified four pathways/gene networks and eight paralogous gene families affected by Microcystis. Differential regulation of the ribosome, including three paralogous gene families encoding 40S, 60S, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, suggests an impact of Microcystis on protein synthesis of D. pulex. In addition, differential regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (including the NADH:ubquinone oxidoreductase gene family) and the trypsin paralogous gene family (a major component of the digestive system in D. pulex) could explain why fitness is reduced based on energy budget considerations.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
AQUATIC ORGANISMS, DROSOPHILA NEUREXIN, OXIDATIVE STRESS, IN-VIVO, MAGNA, LR, MITOCHONDRIA, BLOOMS, HEPATOCYTES, MECHANISMS
journal title
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Environ. Sci. Technol.
volume
46
issue
15
pages
8448 - 8457
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000307199800068
JCR category
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
5.257 (2012)
JCR rank
7/209 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0013-936X
DOI
10.1021/es301100j
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2969894
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2969894
date created
2012-08-08 15:55:39
date last changed
2012-09-28 11:30:56
@article{2969894,
  abstract     = {Although cyanobacteria produce a wide range of natural toxins that impact aquatic organisms, food webs, and water quality, the mechanisms of toxicity are still insufficiently understood. Here, we implemented a whole-genome expression microarray to identify pathways, gene networks, and paralogous gene families responsive to Microcystis stress in Daphnia pulex. Therefore, neonates of a sensitive isolate were given a diet contaminated with Microcystis to contrast with those given a control diet for 16 days. The microarray revealed 2247 differentially expressed (DE) genes (7.6\% of the array) in response to Microcystis, of which 17\% are lineage-specific (i.e., these genes have no detectable homology to any other gene in currently available databases) and 49\% are gene duplicates (paralogues). We identified four pathways/gene networks and eight paralogous gene families affected by Microcystis. Differential regulation of the ribosome, including three paralogous gene families encoding 40S, 60S, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, suggests an impact of Microcystis on protein synthesis of D. pulex. In addition, differential regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (including the NADH:ubquinone oxidoreductase gene family) and the trypsin paralogous gene family (a major component of the digestive system in D. pulex) could explain why fitness is reduced based on energy budget considerations.},
  author       = {Asselman, Jana and De Coninck, Dieter and Glaholt, Stephen and Colbourne, John K and Janssen, Colin and Shaw, Joseph R and De Schamphelaere, Karel},
  issn         = {0013-936X},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE \& TECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {AQUATIC ORGANISMS,DROSOPHILA NEUREXIN,OXIDATIVE STRESS,IN-VIVO,MAGNA,LR,MITOCHONDRIA,BLOOMS,HEPATOCYTES,MECHANISMS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {15},
  pages        = {8448--8457},
  title        = {Identification of pathways, gene networks, and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es301100j},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Asselman, Jana, Dieter De Coninck, Stephen Glaholt, John K Colbourne, Colin Janssen, Joseph R Shaw, and Karel De Schamphelaere. 2012. “Identification of Pathways, Gene Networks, and Paralogous Gene Families in Daphnia Pulex Responding to Exposure to the Toxic Cyanobacterium Microcystis Aeruginosa.” Environmental Science & Technology 46 (15): 8448–8457.
APA
Asselman, J., De Coninck, D., Glaholt, S., Colbourne, J. K., Janssen, C., Shaw, J. R., & De Schamphelaere, K. (2012). Identification of pathways, gene networks, and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 46(15), 8448–8457.
Vancouver
1.
Asselman J, De Coninck D, Glaholt S, Colbourne JK, Janssen C, Shaw JR, et al. Identification of pathways, gene networks, and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY. 2012;46(15):8448–57.
MLA
Asselman, Jana, Dieter De Coninck, Stephen Glaholt, et al. “Identification of Pathways, Gene Networks, and Paralogous Gene Families in Daphnia Pulex Responding to Exposure to the Toxic Cyanobacterium Microcystis Aeruginosa.” ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 46.15 (2012): 8448–8457. Print.