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When predictions take control: the effect of task predictions on task switching performance

Wout Duthoo UGent, Wouter De Baene UGent, Peter Wühr and Wim Notebaert UGent (2012) FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 3. p.1-9
abstract
In this paper, we aimed to investigate the role of self-generated predictions in the flexible control of behavior. Therefore, we ran a task switching experiment in which participants were asked to try to predict the upcoming task in three conditions varying in switch rate (30, 50, and 70%). Irrespective of their predictions, the color of the target indicated which task participants had to perform. In line with previous studies (Mayr, 2006; Monsell and Mizon, 2006), the switch cost was attenuated as the switch rate increased. Importantly, a clear task repetition bias was found in all conditions, yet the task repetition prediction rate dropped from 78 over 66 to 49% with increasing switch probability in the three conditions. Irrespective of condition, the switch cost was strongly reduced in expectation of a task alternation compared to the cost of an unexpected task alternation following repetition predictions. Hence, our data suggest that the reduction in the switch cost with increasing switch probability is caused by a diminished expectancy for the task to repeat. Taken together, this paper highlights the importance of predictions in the flexible control of behavior, and suggests a crucial role for task repetition expectancy in the context-sensitive adjusting of task switching performance.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
task switching, proactive cognitive control, switch cost, expectancy bias, prediction
journal title
FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Front. Psychology
volume
3
article_number
282
pages
1 - 9
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000208863900293
ISSN
1664-1078
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
VABB id
c:vabb:337457
VABB type
VABB-1
id
2969709
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2969709
alternative location
http://www.frontiersin.org/Cognition/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00282/full
date created
2012-08-08 13:14:37
date last changed
2014-04-22 15:44:53
@article{2969709,
  abstract     = {In this paper, we aimed to investigate the role of self-generated predictions in the flexible control of behavior. Therefore, we ran a task switching experiment in which participants were asked to try to predict the upcoming task in three conditions varying in switch rate (30, 50, and 70\%). Irrespective of their predictions, the color of the target indicated which task participants had to perform. In line with previous studies (Mayr, 2006; Monsell and Mizon, 2006), the switch cost was attenuated as the switch rate increased. Importantly, a clear task repetition bias was found in all conditions, yet the task repetition prediction rate dropped from 78 over 66 to 49\% with increasing switch probability in the three conditions. Irrespective of condition, the switch cost was strongly reduced in expectation of a task alternation compared to the cost of an unexpected task alternation following repetition predictions. Hence, our data suggest that the reduction in the switch cost with increasing switch probability is caused by a diminished expectancy for the task to repeat. Taken together, this paper highlights the importance of predictions in the flexible control of behavior, and suggests a crucial role for task repetition expectancy in the context-sensitive adjusting of task switching performance.},
  articleno    = {282},
  author       = {Duthoo, Wout and De Baene, Wouter and W{\"u}hr, Peter and Notebaert, Wim},
  issn         = {1664-1078},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {task switching,proactive cognitive control,switch cost,expectancy bias,prediction},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {282:1--282:9},
  title        = {When predictions take control: the effect of task predictions on task switching performance},
  url          = {http://www.frontiersin.org/Cognition/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00282/full},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Duthoo, Wout, Wouter De Baene, Peter Wühr, and Wim Notebaert. 2012. “When Predictions Take Control: The Effect of Task Predictions on Task Switching Performance.” Frontiers in Psychology 3: 1–9.
APA
Duthoo, W., De Baene, W., Wühr, P., & Notebaert, W. (2012). When predictions take control: the effect of task predictions on task switching performance. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 3, 1–9.
Vancouver
1.
Duthoo W, De Baene W, Wühr P, Notebaert W. When predictions take control: the effect of task predictions on task switching performance. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 2012;3:1–9.
MLA
Duthoo, Wout, Wouter De Baene, Peter Wühr, et al. “When Predictions Take Control: The Effect of Task Predictions on Task Switching Performance.” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 (2012): 1–9. Print.