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White-matter connectivity between face-responsive regions in the human brain

Markus Gschwind, Gilles Pourtois UGent, Sophie Schwartz, Dimitri Van de Ville and Patrik Vuilleumier (2012) CEREBRAL CORTEX. 22(7). p.1564-1576
abstract
Face recognition is of major social importance and involves highly selective brain regions thought to be organized in a distributed functional network. However, the exact architecture of interconnections between these regions remains unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify face-responsive regions in 22 participants and then employed diffusion tensor imaging with probabilistic tractography to establish the white-matter pathways between these functionally defined regions. We identified strong white-matter connections between the occipital face area (OFA) and fusiform face area (FFA), with a significant right-hemisphere predominance. We found no evidence for direct anatomical connections between FFA and superior temporal sulcus (STS) or between OFA and STS, contrary to predictions based on current cognitive models. Instead, our findings point to segregated processing along a ventral extrastriate visual pathway to OFA-FFA and another more dorsal system connected to STS and frontoparietal areas. In addition, early occipital areas were found to have direct connections to the amygdala, which might underlie a rapid recruitment of limbic brain areas by visual inputs bypassing more elaborate extrastriate cortical processing. These results unveil the structural neural architecture of the human face recognition system and provide new insights on how distributed face-responsive areas may work together.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PROBABILISTIC DIFFUSION TRACTOGRAPHY, SUPERIOR TEMPORAL SULCUS, POSTERIOR PARIETAL CORTEX, HUMAN EXTRASTRIATE CORTEX, VENTRAL VISUAL STREAM, HUMAN NEURAL SYSTEM, EVENT-RELATED FMRI, RHESUS-MONKEY, IN-VIVO, FUSIFORM CORTEX, DTI, face network, face processing, fMRI, tractography, white-matter connectivity
journal title
CEREBRAL CORTEX
Cereb. Cortex
volume
22
issue
7
pages
1564 - 1576
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000305610700009
JCR category
NEUROSCIENCES
JCR impact factor
6.828 (2012)
JCR rank
24/251 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
1047-3211
DOI
10.1093/cercor/bhr226
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
2967111
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2967111
date created
2012-08-02 16:16:40
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:12:21
@article{2967111,
  abstract     = {Face recognition is of major social importance and involves highly selective brain regions thought to be organized in a distributed functional network. However, the exact architecture of interconnections between these regions remains unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify face-responsive regions in 22 participants and then employed diffusion tensor imaging with probabilistic tractography to establish the white-matter pathways between these functionally defined regions. We identified strong white-matter connections between the occipital face area (OFA) and fusiform face area (FFA), with a significant right-hemisphere predominance. We found no evidence for direct anatomical connections between FFA and superior temporal sulcus (STS) or between OFA and STS, contrary to predictions based on current cognitive models. Instead, our findings point to segregated processing along a ventral extrastriate visual pathway to OFA-FFA and another more dorsal system connected to STS and frontoparietal areas. In addition, early occipital areas were found to have direct connections to the amygdala, which might underlie a rapid recruitment of limbic brain areas by visual inputs bypassing more elaborate extrastriate cortical processing. These results unveil the structural neural architecture of the human face recognition system and provide new insights on how distributed face-responsive areas may work together.},
  author       = {Gschwind, Markus and Pourtois, Gilles and Schwartz, Sophie and de Ville, Dimitri Van and Vuilleumier, Patrik},
  issn         = {1047-3211},
  journal      = {CEREBRAL CORTEX},
  keyword      = {PROBABILISTIC DIFFUSION TRACTOGRAPHY,SUPERIOR TEMPORAL SULCUS,POSTERIOR PARIETAL CORTEX,HUMAN EXTRASTRIATE CORTEX,VENTRAL VISUAL STREAM,HUMAN NEURAL SYSTEM,EVENT-RELATED FMRI,RHESUS-MONKEY,IN-VIVO,FUSIFORM CORTEX,DTI,face network,face processing,fMRI,tractography,white-matter connectivity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1564--1576},
  title        = {White-matter connectivity between face-responsive regions in the human brain},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhr226},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Gschwind, Markus, Gilles Pourtois, Sophie Schwartz, Dimitri Van de Ville, and Patrik Vuilleumier. 2012. “White-matter Connectivity Between Face-responsive Regions in the Human Brain.” Cerebral Cortex 22 (7): 1564–1576.
APA
Gschwind, M., Pourtois, G., Schwartz, S., de Ville, D. V., & Vuilleumier, P. (2012). White-matter connectivity between face-responsive regions in the human brain. CEREBRAL CORTEX, 22(7), 1564–1576.
Vancouver
1.
Gschwind M, Pourtois G, Schwartz S, de Ville DV, Vuilleumier P. White-matter connectivity between face-responsive regions in the human brain. CEREBRAL CORTEX. 2012;22(7):1564–76.
MLA
Gschwind, Markus, Gilles Pourtois, Sophie Schwartz, et al. “White-matter Connectivity Between Face-responsive Regions in the Human Brain.” CEREBRAL CORTEX 22.7 (2012): 1564–1576. Print.