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Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere

S Sharma, E Chan, M Ishizawa, D Toom-Sauntry, SL Gong, SM Li, DW Tarasick, WR Leaitch, A Norman and PK Quinn, et al. (2012) JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 117.
abstract
The recent decline in sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean could affect the regional radiative forcing via changes in sea ice-atmosphere exchange of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and biogenic aerosols formed from its atmospheric oxidation, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70 degrees N and atmospheric MSA measurement at Alert, Nunavut, during 1980-2009; at Barrow, Alaska, during 1997-2008; and at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, for 1991-2004. During the 1980-1989 and 1990-1997 periods, summer (July-August) and June MSA concentrations at Alert decreased. In general, MSA concentrations increased at all locations since 2000 with respect to 1990 values, specifically during June and summer at Alert and in summer at Barrow and Ny-Alesund. Our results show variability in MSA at all sites is related to changes in the source strengths of DMS, possibly linked to changes in sea ice extent as well as to changes in atmospheric transport patterns. Since 2000, a late spring increase in atmospheric MSA at the three sites coincides with the northward migration of the marginal ice edge zone where high DMS emissions from ocean to atmosphere have previously been reported. Significant negative correlations are found between sea ice extent and MSA concentrations at the three sites during the spring and June. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could lead to higher atmospheric MSA concentrations.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
EDGE BLOOMS, NORTH-ATLANTIC, SEA, PHYTOPLANKTON, CLIMATE, METHANESULFONIC-ACID, MARINE AEROSOL, DIMETHYL SULFIDE, CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION, BIOLOGICAL-ACTIVITY
journal title
JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES
J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos.
volume
117
article_number
D12209
pages
12 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000305995100001
JCR category
GEOSCIENCES, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
3.174 (2012)
JCR rank
23/170 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0148-0227
DOI
10.1029/2011JD017074
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2966621
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2966621
date created
2012-08-01 15:09:01
date last changed
2013-01-02 00:32:06
@article{2966621,
  abstract     = {The recent decline in sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean could affect the regional radiative forcing via changes in sea ice-atmosphere exchange of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and biogenic aerosols formed from its atmospheric oxidation, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70 degrees N and atmospheric MSA measurement at Alert, Nunavut, during 1980-2009; at Barrow, Alaska, during 1997-2008; and at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, for 1991-2004. During the 1980-1989 and 1990-1997 periods, summer (July-August) and June MSA concentrations at Alert decreased. In general, MSA concentrations increased at all locations since 2000 with respect to 1990 values, specifically during June and summer at Alert and in summer at Barrow and Ny-Alesund. Our results show variability in MSA at all sites is related to changes in the source strengths of DMS, possibly linked to changes in sea ice extent as well as to changes in atmospheric transport patterns. Since 2000, a late spring increase in atmospheric MSA at the three sites coincides with the northward migration of the marginal ice edge zone where high DMS emissions from ocean to atmosphere have previously been reported. Significant negative correlations are found between sea ice extent and MSA concentrations at the three sites during the spring and June. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could lead to higher atmospheric MSA concentrations.},
  articleno    = {D12209},
  author       = {Sharma, S and Chan, E and Ishizawa, M and Toom-Sauntry, D and Gong, SL and Li, SM and Tarasick, DW and Leaitch, WR and Norman, A and Quinn, PK and Bates, TS and Levasseur, M and Barrie, LA and Maenhaut, Willy},
  issn         = {0148-0227},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES},
  keyword      = {EDGE BLOOMS,NORTH-ATLANTIC,SEA,PHYTOPLANKTON,CLIMATE,METHANESULFONIC-ACID,MARINE AEROSOL,DIMETHYL SULFIDE,CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION,BIOLOGICAL-ACTIVITY},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {12},
  title        = {Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2011JD017074},
  volume       = {117},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Sharma, S, E Chan, M Ishizawa, D Toom-Sauntry, SL Gong, SM Li, DW Tarasick, et al. 2012. “Influence of Transport and Ocean Ice Extent on Biogenic Aerosol Sulfur in the Arctic Atmosphere.” Journal of Geophysical Research-atmospheres 117.
APA
Sharma, S, Chan, E., Ishizawa, M., Toom-Sauntry, D., Gong, S., Li, S., Tarasick, D., et al. (2012). Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES, 117.
Vancouver
1.
Sharma S, Chan E, Ishizawa M, Toom-Sauntry D, Gong S, Li S, et al. Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 2012;117.
MLA
Sharma, S, E Chan, M Ishizawa, et al. “Influence of Transport and Ocean Ice Extent on Biogenic Aerosol Sulfur in the Arctic Atmosphere.” JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES 117 (2012): n. pag. Print.