Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Strigolactones suppress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis and pea

Amanda Rasmussen, Michael Glenn Mason, Carolien De Cuyper UGent, Philip B Brewer, Silvia Herold, Javier Agusti, Danny Geelen UGent, Thomas Greb, Sofie Goormachtig UGent and Tom Beeckman UGent, et al. (2012) PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 158(4). p.1976-1987
abstract
Adventitious root formation is essential for the propagation of many commercially important plant species and involves the formation of roots from nonroot tissues such as stems or leaves. Here, we demonstrate that the plant hormone strigolactone suppresses adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and pea (Pisum sativum). Strigolactone-deficient and response mutants of both species have enhanced adventitious rooting. CYCLIN B1 expression, an early marker for the initiation of adventitious root primordia in Arabidopsis, is enhanced in more axillary growth2 (max2), a strigolactone response mutant, suggesting that strigolactones restrain the number of adventitious roots by inhibiting the very first formative divisions of the founder cells. Strigolactones and cytokinins appear to act independently to suppress adventitious rooting, as cytokinin mutants are strigolactone responsive and strigolactone mutants are cytokinin responsive. In contrast, the interaction between the strigolactone and auxin signaling pathways in regulating adventitious rooting appears to be more complex. Strigolactone can at least partially revert the stimulatory effect of auxin on adventitious rooting, and auxin can further increase the number of adventitious roots in max mutants. We present a model depicting the interaction of strigolactones, cytokinins, and auxin in regulating adventitious root formation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ZEATIN RIBOSIDE, STEM CUTTINGS, MATURATION-RELATED LOSS, AUXIN TRANSPORT, POSITIVE REGULATOR, SECONDARY GROWTH, CYTOKININ CONTENT, LEAF SENESCENCE, SHOOT, PLANT
journal title
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Plant Physiol.
volume
158
issue
4
pages
1976 - 1987
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000303001400039
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
6.555 (2012)
JCR rank
8/193 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0032-0889
DOI
10.1104/pp.111.187104
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2965445
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2965445
date created
2012-07-30 13:52:55
date last changed
2012-08-07 12:44:47
@article{2965445,
  abstract     = {Adventitious root formation is essential for the propagation of many commercially important plant species and involves the formation of roots from nonroot tissues such as stems or leaves. Here, we demonstrate that the plant hormone strigolactone suppresses adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and pea (Pisum sativum). Strigolactone-deficient and response mutants of both species have enhanced adventitious rooting. CYCLIN B1 expression, an early marker for the initiation of adventitious root primordia in Arabidopsis, is enhanced in more axillary growth2 (max2), a strigolactone response mutant, suggesting that strigolactones restrain the number of adventitious roots by inhibiting the very first formative divisions of the founder cells. Strigolactones and cytokinins appear to act independently to suppress adventitious rooting, as cytokinin mutants are strigolactone responsive and strigolactone mutants are cytokinin responsive. In contrast, the interaction between the strigolactone and auxin signaling pathways in regulating adventitious rooting appears to be more complex. Strigolactone can at least partially revert the stimulatory effect of auxin on adventitious rooting, and auxin can further increase the number of adventitious roots in max mutants. We present a model depicting the interaction of strigolactones, cytokinins, and auxin in regulating adventitious root formation.},
  author       = {Rasmussen, Amanda and Mason, Michael Glenn and De Cuyper, Carolien and Brewer, Philip B and Herold, Silvia and Agusti, Javier and Geelen, Danny and Greb, Thomas and Goormachtig, Sofie and Beeckman, Tom and Beveridge, Christine Anne},
  issn         = {0032-0889},
  journal      = {PLANT PHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {ZEATIN RIBOSIDE,STEM CUTTINGS,MATURATION-RELATED LOSS,AUXIN TRANSPORT,POSITIVE REGULATOR,SECONDARY GROWTH,CYTOKININ CONTENT,LEAF SENESCENCE,SHOOT,PLANT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1976--1987},
  title        = {Strigolactones suppress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis and pea},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.111.187104},
  volume       = {158},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Rasmussen, Amanda, Michael Glenn Mason, Carolien De Cuyper, Philip B Brewer, Silvia Herold, Javier Agusti, Danny Geelen, et al. 2012. “Strigolactones Suppress Adventitious Rooting in Arabidopsis and Pea.” Plant Physiology 158 (4): 1976–1987.
APA
Rasmussen, A., Mason, M. G., De Cuyper, C., Brewer, P. B., Herold, S., Agusti, J., Geelen, D., et al. (2012). Strigolactones suppress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis and pea. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY, 158(4), 1976–1987.
Vancouver
1.
Rasmussen A, Mason MG, De Cuyper C, Brewer PB, Herold S, Agusti J, et al. Strigolactones suppress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis and pea. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 2012;158(4):1976–87.
MLA
Rasmussen, Amanda, Michael Glenn Mason, Carolien De Cuyper, et al. “Strigolactones Suppress Adventitious Rooting in Arabidopsis and Pea.” PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 158.4 (2012): 1976–1987. Print.