Advanced search
1 file | 413.73 KB

Sap flow, stem diameter variations and mechanistic modelling have potential to assess root pressure

Tom De Swaef (UGent) and Kathy Steppe (UGent)
(2012) Acta Horticulturae. 951. p.111-115
Author
Organization
Abstract
Upward water movement in plants via the xylem is generally attributed to transpiration. Under certain environmental conditions also root pressure can contribute to upward xylem water flow as an additional feature. Although the occurrence of root pressure is widely recognized in several plant species, some ambiguity still exists about the exact mechanism behind root pressure, the main influencing factors and the possible consequences. Furthermore, in many horticultural crops, root pressure is thought to cause cells to burst, and as such to have a significant impact on the marketable yield. Despite the big challenges in root pressure research, progress in this area is limited, mostly because of difficulties with direct root pressure measurements. To allow non-destructive and non-invasive estimation of root pressure, we present a new theoretical approach using hypothetic measurements of sap flow and stem diameter variations combined with a mechanistic flow and storage model, based on cohesion tension principles. Transpiration-driven sap flow rates are typically inversely related to stem diameter variations. However, when root pressure is present, the xylem water potential is partly decoupled from sap flow rates and root pressure is consequently reflected in stem diameter variations.
Keywords
phloem, turgor, xylem, PLANTS, WATER, LEAVES, vapour pressure deficit, cohesion tension

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 413.73 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Swaef, Tom, and Kathy Steppe. 2012. “Sap Flow, Stem Diameter Variations and Mechanistic Modelling Have Potential to Assess Root Pressure.” In Acta Horticulturae, ed. L Sebastiani, R Tognetti, and A Motisi, 951:111–115. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
APA
De Swaef, T., & Steppe, K. (2012). Sap flow, stem diameter variations and mechanistic modelling have potential to assess root pressure. In L. Sebastiani, R. Tognetti, & A. Motisi (Eds.), Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 951, pp. 111–115). Presented at the 8th International workshop on Sap Flow, Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Vancouver
1.
De Swaef T, Steppe K. Sap flow, stem diameter variations and mechanistic modelling have potential to assess root pressure. In: Sebastiani L, Tognetti R, Motisi A, editors. Acta Horticulturae. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS); 2012. p. 111–5.
MLA
De Swaef, Tom, and Kathy Steppe. “Sap Flow, Stem Diameter Variations and Mechanistic Modelling Have Potential to Assess Root Pressure.” Acta Horticulturae. Ed. L Sebastiani, R Tognetti, & A Motisi. Vol. 951. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), 2012. 111–115. Print.
@inproceedings{2961714,
  abstract     = {Upward water movement in plants via the xylem is generally attributed to transpiration. Under certain environmental conditions also root pressure can contribute to upward xylem water flow as an additional feature. Although the occurrence of root pressure is widely recognized in several plant species, some ambiguity still exists about the exact mechanism behind root pressure, the main influencing factors and the possible consequences. Furthermore, in many horticultural crops, root pressure is thought to cause cells to burst, and as such to have a significant impact on the marketable yield. Despite the big challenges in root pressure research, progress in this area is limited, mostly because of difficulties with direct root pressure measurements. 
To allow non-destructive and non-invasive estimation of root pressure, we present a new theoretical approach using hypothetic measurements of sap flow and stem diameter variations combined with a mechanistic flow and storage model, based on cohesion tension principles. Transpiration-driven sap flow rates are typically inversely related to stem diameter variations. However, when root pressure is present, the xylem water potential is partly decoupled from sap flow rates and root pressure is consequently reflected in stem diameter variations.},
  author       = {De Swaef, Tom and Steppe, Kathy},
  booktitle    = {Acta Horticulturae},
  editor       = {Sebastiani, L and Tognetti, R and Motisi, A},
  isbn         = {9789066053588},
  issn         = {0567-7572},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Volterra, Italy},
  pages        = {111--115},
  publisher    = {International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)},
  title        = {Sap flow, stem diameter variations and mechanistic modelling have potential to assess root pressure},
  url          = {http://www.actahort.org/books/951/951\_12.htm},
  volume       = {951},
  year         = {2012},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: