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The default mode network and recurrent depression: a neurobiological model of cognitive risk factors

Igor Marchetti (UGent) , Ernst Koster (UGent) , Edmund Barke (UGent) and Rudi De Raedt (UGent)
(2012) NEUROPSYCHOLOGY REVIEW. 22(3). p.229-251
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Abstract
A neurobiological account of cognitive vulnerability for recurrent depression is presented based on recent developments of resting state neural networks. We propose that alterations in the interplay between task positive (TP) and task negative (TN) elements of the Default Mode Network (DMN) act as a neurobiological risk factor for recurrent depression mediated by cognitive mechanisms. In the framework, depression is characterized by an imbalance between TN-TP components leading to an overpowering of TP by TN activity. The TN-TP imbalance is associated with a dysfunctional internally-focused cognitive style as well as a failure to attenuate TN activity in the transition from rest to task. Thus we propose the TN-TP imbalance as overarching neural mechanism involved in crucial cognitive risk factors for recurrent depression, namely rumination, impaired attentional control, and cognitive reactivity. During remission the TN-TP imbalance persists predisposing to vulnerability of recurrent depression. Empirical data to support this model is reviewed. Finally, we specify how this framework can guide future research efforts.
Keywords
DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX, STATE FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY, ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX, GLOBAL SIGNAL REGRESSION, RESPONSE STYLES THEORY, NEGATIVE LIFE EVENTS, MAJOR DEPRESSION, EMOTIONAL INFORMATION, UNIPOLAR DEPRESSION, EXECUTIVE CONTROL, Depression, Default mode network, Vulnerability, Rumination, Attention, Cognitive reactivity

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MLA
Marchetti, Igor et al. “The Default Mode Network and Recurrent Depression: a Neurobiological Model of Cognitive Risk Factors.” NEUROPSYCHOLOGY REVIEW 22.3 (2012): 229–251. Print.
APA
Marchetti, I., Koster, E., Barke, E., & De Raedt, R. (2012). The default mode network and recurrent depression: a neurobiological model of cognitive risk factors. NEUROPSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, 22(3), 229–251.
Chicago author-date
Marchetti, Igor, Ernst Koster, Edmund Barke, and Rudi De Raedt. 2012. “The Default Mode Network and Recurrent Depression: a Neurobiological Model of Cognitive Risk Factors.” Neuropsychology Review 22 (3): 229–251.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Marchetti, Igor, Ernst Koster, Edmund Barke, and Rudi De Raedt. 2012. “The Default Mode Network and Recurrent Depression: a Neurobiological Model of Cognitive Risk Factors.” Neuropsychology Review 22 (3): 229–251.
Vancouver
1.
Marchetti I, Koster E, Barke E, De Raedt R. The default mode network and recurrent depression: a neurobiological model of cognitive risk factors. NEUROPSYCHOLOGY REVIEW. 2012;22(3):229–51.
IEEE
[1]
I. Marchetti, E. Koster, E. Barke, and R. De Raedt, “The default mode network and recurrent depression: a neurobiological model of cognitive risk factors,” NEUROPSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 229–251, 2012.
@article{2958601,
  abstract     = {A neurobiological account of cognitive vulnerability for recurrent depression is presented based on recent developments of resting state neural networks. We propose that alterations in the interplay between task positive (TP) and task negative (TN) elements of the Default Mode Network (DMN) act as a neurobiological risk factor for recurrent depression mediated by cognitive mechanisms. In the framework, depression is characterized by an imbalance between TN-TP components leading to an overpowering of TP by TN activity. The TN-TP imbalance is associated with a dysfunctional internally-focused cognitive style as well as a failure to attenuate TN activity in the transition from rest to task. Thus we propose the TN-TP imbalance as overarching neural mechanism involved in crucial cognitive risk factors for recurrent depression, namely rumination, impaired attentional control, and cognitive reactivity. During remission the TN-TP imbalance persists predisposing to vulnerability of recurrent depression. Empirical data to support this model is reviewed. Finally, we specify how this framework can guide future research efforts.},
  author       = {Marchetti, Igor and Koster, Ernst and Barke, Edmund and De Raedt, Rudi},
  issn         = {1040-7308},
  journal      = {NEUROPSYCHOLOGY REVIEW},
  keywords     = {DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX,STATE FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY,ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX,GLOBAL SIGNAL REGRESSION,RESPONSE STYLES THEORY,NEGATIVE LIFE EVENTS,MAJOR DEPRESSION,EMOTIONAL INFORMATION,UNIPOLAR DEPRESSION,EXECUTIVE CONTROL,Depression,Default mode network,Vulnerability,Rumination,Attention,Cognitive reactivity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {229--251},
  title        = {The default mode network and recurrent depression: a neurobiological model of cognitive risk factors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11065-012-9199-9},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2012},
}

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