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How useful are screening instruments for toddlers to predict outcome at age 4? General development, language skills, and symptom severity in children with a false positive screen for autism spectrum disorder

Mieke Dereu UGent, Herbert Roeyers UGent, Ruth Raymaekers UGent, Mieke Meirsschaut UGent and Petra Warreyn UGent (2012) EUROPEAN CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY. 21(10). p.541-551
abstract
Screening instruments for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often generate many false positives. It is argued that these children may have other developmental difficulties and are also in need of thorough assessment and early intervention. The current study looked at the predictive validity of positive screens on the Checklist for Early Signs of Developmental Disorders (CESDD) and the Early Screening of Autistic Traits questionnaire (ESAT) at age 2 towards language, cognitive function, and symptom severity at age 4. Children who screened positive on the ESAT scored lower for both language and cognitive functioning at age 4 compared with children who screened negative on the ESAT. Also, the more signs of ASD that were recognized on the CESDD or ESAT, the lower the scores for language and cognitive functioning at age 4. False positive screens could be differentiated from true positive screens on the CESDD only in symptom severity score on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). It seems that early screeners for ASD also detect children with other developmental disorders and that diagnostic instruments such as the ADOS are warranted to differentiate between children with ASD and other developmental problems.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DIAGNOSTIC-OBSERVATION-SCHEDULE, TRAITS QUESTIONNAIRE ESAT, MODIFIED CHECKLIST, REVISED ALGORITHMS, ADOS SCORES, POPULATION, VALIDITY, SIGNS, CHAT, Autism spectrum disorder, Screening, Toddlers, Language, General development, Symptom severity
journal title
EUROPEAN CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY
Eur. Child Adolesc. Psych.
volume
21
issue
10
pages
541 - 551
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000309872300002
JCR category
PEDIATRICS
JCR impact factor
3.699 (2012)
JCR rank
5/119 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
1018-8827
DOI
10.1007/s00787-012-0280-y
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2958401
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2958401
date created
2012-07-09 11:45:38
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:11:21
@article{2958401,
  abstract     = {Screening instruments for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often generate many false positives. It is argued that these children may have other developmental difficulties and are also in need of thorough assessment and early intervention. The current study looked at the predictive validity of positive screens on the Checklist for Early Signs of Developmental Disorders (CESDD) and the Early Screening of Autistic Traits questionnaire (ESAT) at age 2 towards language, cognitive function, and symptom severity at age 4. Children who screened positive on the ESAT scored lower for both language and cognitive functioning at age 4 compared with children who screened negative on the ESAT. Also, the more signs of ASD that were recognized on the CESDD or ESAT, the lower the scores for language and cognitive functioning at age 4. False positive screens could be differentiated from true positive screens on the CESDD only in symptom severity score on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). It seems that early screeners for ASD also detect children with other developmental disorders and that diagnostic instruments such as the ADOS are warranted to differentiate between children with ASD and other developmental problems.},
  author       = {Dereu, Mieke and Roeyers, Herbert and Raymaekers, Ruth and Meirsschaut, Mieke and Warreyn, Petra},
  issn         = {1018-8827},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN CHILD \& ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY},
  keyword      = {DIAGNOSTIC-OBSERVATION-SCHEDULE,TRAITS QUESTIONNAIRE ESAT,MODIFIED CHECKLIST,REVISED ALGORITHMS,ADOS SCORES,POPULATION,VALIDITY,SIGNS,CHAT,Autism spectrum disorder,Screening,Toddlers,Language,General development,Symptom severity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {541--551},
  title        = {How useful are screening instruments for toddlers to predict outcome at age 4? General development, language skills, and symptom severity in children with a false positive screen for autism spectrum disorder},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-012-0280-y},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Dereu, Mieke, Herbert Roeyers, Ruth Raymaekers, Mieke Meirsschaut, and Petra Warreyn. 2012. “How Useful Are Screening Instruments for Toddlers to Predict Outcome at Age 4? General Development, Language Skills, and Symptom Severity in Children with a False Positive Screen for Autism Spectrum Disorder.” European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 21 (10): 541–551.
APA
Dereu, M., Roeyers, H., Raymaekers, R., Meirsschaut, M., & Warreyn, P. (2012). How useful are screening instruments for toddlers to predict outcome at age 4? General development, language skills, and symptom severity in children with a false positive screen for autism spectrum disorder. EUROPEAN CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY, 21(10), 541–551.
Vancouver
1.
Dereu M, Roeyers H, Raymaekers R, Meirsschaut M, Warreyn P. How useful are screening instruments for toddlers to predict outcome at age 4? General development, language skills, and symptom severity in children with a false positive screen for autism spectrum disorder. EUROPEAN CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY. 2012;21(10):541–51.
MLA
Dereu, Mieke, Herbert Roeyers, Ruth Raymaekers, et al. “How Useful Are Screening Instruments for Toddlers to Predict Outcome at Age 4? General Development, Language Skills, and Symptom Severity in Children with a False Positive Screen for Autism Spectrum Disorder.” EUROPEAN CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY 21.10 (2012): 541–551. Print.