Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Process mining: get your processes out of the black box

Jan Claes UGent and Mieke Jans (2012) THE INTERNAL AUDITOR COMPASS. p.42-44
abstract
Organizations often construct business process models to document how they think processes are executed (as-is) or should be executed (to-be). But are these models accurate? Do they represent real process execution or do they only reflect people’s perceptions about processes? – Typically, an auditor has to pick samples to verify certain regulations. These sample cases are mostly selected rather randomly. But isn’t it possible to use a technique that directs you quickly to suspicious cases? Wouldn’t it be interesting to be able to focus on exceptional cases right from the start? – Process mining helps you with that. It is an umbrella term for dozens of techniques that derive interesting information from historical process data that can be found in so called log files of your software systems. This will empower an auditor with the tools to focus on real process execution and to quickly jump to exceptional behavior.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
THE INTERNAL AUDITOR COMPASS
issue
september
pages
42 - 44
publisher
IIA Belgium
ISSN
N/A
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A4
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2953428
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2953428
date created
2012-07-03 19:39:06
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:11:02
@article{2953428,
  abstract     = {Organizations often construct business process models to document how they think processes are executed (as-is) or should be executed (to-be). But are these models accurate? Do they represent real process execution or do they only reflect people{\textquoteright}s perceptions about processes? -- Typically, an auditor has to pick samples to verify certain regulations. These sample cases are mostly selected rather randomly. But isn{\textquoteright}t it possible to use a technique that directs you quickly to suspicious cases? Wouldn{\textquoteright}t it be interesting to be able to focus on exceptional cases right from the start? -- Process mining helps you with that. It is an umbrella term for dozens of techniques that derive interesting information from historical process data that can be found in so called log files of your software systems. This will empower an auditor with the tools to focus on real process execution and to quickly jump to exceptional behavior.},
  author       = {Claes, Jan and Jans, Mieke},
  issn         = {N/A},
  journal      = {THE INTERNAL AUDITOR COMPASS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {september},
  pages        = {42--44},
  publisher    = {IIA Belgium},
  title        = {Process mining: get your processes out of the black box},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Claes, Jan, and Mieke Jans. 2012. “Process Mining: Get Your Processes Out of the Black Box.” The Internal Auditor Compass (september): 42–44.
APA
Claes, J., & Jans, M. (2012). Process mining: get your processes out of the black box. THE INTERNAL AUDITOR COMPASS, (september), 42–44.
Vancouver
1.
Claes J, Jans M. Process mining: get your processes out of the black box. THE INTERNAL AUDITOR COMPASS. IIA Belgium; 2012;(september):42–4.
MLA
Claes, Jan, and Mieke Jans. “Process Mining: Get Your Processes Out of the Black Box.” THE INTERNAL AUDITOR COMPASS september (2012): 42–44. Print.