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The triple articulation of media technologies in audiovisual media consumption

Cédric Courtois (UGent) , Pieter Verdegem (UGent) and Lieven De Marez (UGent)
(2013) TELEVISION & NEW MEDIA. 14(5). p.421-439
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Abstract
This article departs from the concept of “double articulation” within domestication theory, which views media as both objects and texts. Unfortunately, its empirical application has been problematic because researchers tend to concentrate on the contextual, losing sight of specific meanings of objects and texts. Therefore, we subscribe to the concept of “triple articulation,” viewing the immediate sociospatial context of consumption as a specific articulation. Still, the practical relevance of this concept has been questioned. Therefore, we develop and test a methodology that explicitly incorporates this triple articulation in the field of convergent audiovisual media consumption. The results indicate that audiovisual media technologies are meaningfully articulated as objects, texts, and contexts. Moreover, the devised method, which allows the uncovering of articulation interactions, points out that each articulation is able to contribute independently to consumption meanings. Hence, the variation within objects, texts, and contexts raises questions about what we consider “television.”
Keywords
convergence, audiovisual media, domestication theory, double articulation, triple articulation

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Chicago
Courtois, Cédric, Pieter Verdegem, and Lieven De Marez. 2013. “The Triple Articulation of Media Technologies in Audiovisual Media Consumption.” Television & New Media 14 (5): 421–439.
APA
Courtois, C., Verdegem, P., & De Marez, L. (2013). The triple articulation of media technologies in audiovisual media consumption. TELEVISION & NEW MEDIA, 14(5), 421–439.
Vancouver
1.
Courtois C, Verdegem P, De Marez L. The triple articulation of media technologies in audiovisual media consumption. TELEVISION & NEW MEDIA. 2013;14(5):421–39.
MLA
Courtois, Cédric, Pieter Verdegem, and Lieven De Marez. “The Triple Articulation of Media Technologies in Audiovisual Media Consumption.” TELEVISION & NEW MEDIA 14.5 (2013): 421–439. Print.
@article{2942491,
  abstract     = {This article departs from the concept of {\textquotedblleft}double articulation{\textquotedblright} within domestication theory, which views media as both objects and texts. Unfortunately, its empirical application has been problematic because researchers tend to concentrate on the contextual, losing sight of specific meanings of objects and texts. Therefore, we subscribe to the concept of {\textquotedblleft}triple articulation,{\textquotedblright} viewing the immediate sociospatial context of consumption as a specific articulation. Still, the practical relevance of this concept has been questioned. Therefore, we develop and test a methodology that explicitly incorporates this triple articulation in the field of convergent audiovisual media consumption. The results indicate that audiovisual media technologies are meaningfully articulated as objects, texts, and contexts. Moreover, the devised method, which allows the uncovering of articulation interactions, points out that each articulation is able to contribute independently to consumption meanings. Hence, the variation within objects, texts, and contexts raises questions about what we consider {\textquotedblleft}television.{\textquotedblright}},
  author       = {Courtois, C{\'e}dric and Verdegem, Pieter and De Marez, Lieven},
  issn         = {1527-4764},
  journal      = {TELEVISION \& NEW MEDIA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {421--439},
  title        = {The triple articulation of media technologies in audiovisual media consumption},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1527476412439106},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2013},
}

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