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Teenage uploaders on YouTube: networked public expectancies, online feedback preference, and received on-platform feedback

Cédric Courtois, Peter Mechant UGent and Lieven De Marez UGent (2011) CYBERPSYCHOLOGY BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING. 14(5). p.315-322
abstract
This article focuses on teenage YouTube uploaders' networked public expectancies when posting a video. These expectancies allow uploaders to cope temporarily with the uncertainty of who exactly will view their video. The results indicate that teenage uploaders strongly expect viewers that are situated close to them in both geographic and socio-demographic terms. Furthermore, we discuss the uncertainty-reducing properties of online feedback. We propose that different types of online feedback are preferred to verify the prior networked public expectancies. An effect of the identified online public expectancy (viewers with a similar interest/activity) is found for the importance of feedback both on the platform (e.g., views, comments) and off the platform (e.g., interaction on a social-network site). The identified offline public expectancy (friends/family) affects the importance attributed to off-platform feedback. Surprisingly, no effect of the unidentified online public expectancy (the general public) was found on on-platform feedback. This finding, in conjunction with the low expectancy of this group, raises the question of whether teenagers either cannot conceive this ambiguous mass public, or, if their expectancies are accurate, whether they are aware of the fact that only a small fraction of the videos on YouTube reach notable popularity. Therefore, in a second study, we test the accuracy of the online networked public expectancies by testing their effects on the longitudinal growth of actual feedback (views, comments, and rates). The results provide modest evidence that teenage uploaders have accurate online public expectancies.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION, ADOLESCENTS IDENTITY EXPERIMENTS, INTERNET, EXPRESSION, SITES
journal title
CYBERPSYCHOLOGY BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING
Cyberpsychology Behav. Soc. Netw.
volume
14
issue
5
pages
315 - 322
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000290787800011
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIAL
JCR impact factor
0.879 (2011)
JCR rank
41/59 (2011)
JCR quartile
3 (2011)
ISSN
2152-2715
DOI
10.1089/cyber.2010.0225
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2942486
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2942486
date created
2012-06-29 09:34:36
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:54
@article{2942486,
  abstract     = {This article focuses on teenage YouTube uploaders' networked public expectancies when posting a video. These expectancies allow uploaders to cope temporarily with the uncertainty of who exactly will view their video. The results indicate that teenage uploaders strongly expect viewers that are situated close to them in both geographic and socio-demographic terms. Furthermore, we discuss the uncertainty-reducing properties of online feedback. We propose that different types of online feedback are preferred to verify the prior networked public expectancies. An effect of the identified online public expectancy (viewers with a similar interest/activity) is found for the importance of feedback both on the platform (e.g., views, comments) and off the platform (e.g., interaction on a social-network site). The identified offline public expectancy (friends/family) affects the importance attributed to off-platform feedback. Surprisingly, no effect of the unidentified online public expectancy (the general public) was found on on-platform feedback. This finding, in conjunction with the low expectancy of this group, raises the question of whether teenagers either cannot conceive this ambiguous mass public, or, if their expectancies are accurate, whether they are aware of the fact that only a small fraction of the videos on YouTube reach notable popularity. Therefore, in a second study, we test the accuracy of the online networked public expectancies by testing their effects on the longitudinal growth of actual feedback (views, comments, and rates). The results provide modest evidence that teenage uploaders have accurate online public expectancies.},
  author       = {Courtois, C{\'e}dric and Mechant, Peter and De Marez, Lieven},
  issn         = {2152-2715},
  journal      = {CYBERPSYCHOLOGY BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING},
  keyword      = {COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION,ADOLESCENTS IDENTITY EXPERIMENTS,INTERNET,EXPRESSION,SITES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {315--322},
  title        = {Teenage uploaders on YouTube: networked public expectancies, online feedback preference, and received on-platform feedback},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2010.0225},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Courtois, Cédric, Peter Mechant, and Lieven De Marez. 2011. “Teenage Uploaders on YouTube: Networked Public Expectancies, Online Feedback Preference, and Received On-platform Feedback.” Cyberpsychology Behavior and Social Networking 14 (5): 315–322.
APA
Courtois, C., Mechant, P., & De Marez, L. (2011). Teenage uploaders on YouTube: networked public expectancies, online feedback preference, and received on-platform feedback. CYBERPSYCHOLOGY BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING, 14(5), 315–322.
Vancouver
1.
Courtois C, Mechant P, De Marez L. Teenage uploaders on YouTube: networked public expectancies, online feedback preference, and received on-platform feedback. CYBERPSYCHOLOGY BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING. 2011;14(5):315–22.
MLA
Courtois, Cédric, Peter Mechant, and Lieven De Marez. “Teenage Uploaders on YouTube: Networked Public Expectancies, Online Feedback Preference, and Received On-platform Feedback.” CYBERPSYCHOLOGY BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING 14.5 (2011): 315–322. Print.