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Ryegrass response to mineral fertilization and organic amendment with municipal solid waste compost in two tropical agricultural soils of Mali

M Soumare, Filip Tack UGent and Marc Verloo (2003) JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION. 26(6). p.1169-1188
abstract
A pot experiment was conducted to assess the effect of mineral fertilization and compost on the growth and chemical composition of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) grown on two Malian agricultural soils coming from Baguineda, abbreviated as Bgda, (12degrees23'S, 7degrees45'W) and Gao (16degrees18'N, 0degrees). Treatments included non-fertilized control, NPK alone, NPK + C-25, NPK + C-50, NPK + C-100, PK + C-50, NK + C-50, NP + C-50, K + C-50, P + C-50, N + C-50, and C-50 alone, where NPK represents the non modified Hoagland's solution and C-25, C-50, and C-100 represent the different rates (25, 50, and 100 T/ha) of compost. Compost and mineral fertilization significantly increased dry matter production. The application of 50 T/ha of compost alone increased the dry matter yield by 10 and 17.5% while mineral nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium (NPK) increased yield by 69.7 and 65% for Gao and Bgda, respectively. The combination of compost and mineral NPK (NPK + C-25 for Gao and NPK + C-50 for Bgda) affected the highest dry matter yield. For both soils, N concentrations in plants increased significantly with compost rate. Phosphorus and K concentrations in plants varied according to the soil. The application of compost increased the uptake of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and potassium (K from both soils). Increases in soil organic carbon, available P, calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, K, and pH were observed in treatments receiving compost. Therefore, compost appeared to be a good supplier of nutrients for tropical soils.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
rye grass, greenhouse, municipal solid waste compost, Hoagland's solution, Mali, CHEMICAL-PROPERTIES, SEWAGE-SLUDGE, HEAVY-METALS, MANURE COMPOST, WEST-AFRICA, AVAILABILITY, PHOSPHORUS, PRODUCTIVITY, MANAGEMENT, SYSTEM
journal title
JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION
J. Plant Nutr.
volume
26
issue
6
pages
1169 - 1188
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000182995000002
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
0.43 (2003)
JCR rank
107/136 (2003)
JCR quartile
4 (2003)
ISSN
0190-4167
DOI
10.1081/PLN-120020363
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
287876
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-287876
date created
2004-05-27 11:28:00
date last changed
2017-06-15 08:58:37
@article{287876,
  abstract     = {A pot experiment was conducted to assess the effect of mineral fertilization and compost on the growth and chemical composition of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) grown on two Malian agricultural soils coming from Baguineda, abbreviated as Bgda, (12degrees23'S, 7degrees45'W) and Gao (16degrees18'N, 0degrees). Treatments included non-fertilized control, NPK alone, NPK + C-25, NPK + C-50, NPK + C-100, PK + C-50, NK + C-50, NP + C-50, K + C-50, P + C-50, N + C-50, and C-50 alone, where NPK represents the non modified Hoagland's solution and C-25, C-50, and C-100 represent the different rates (25, 50, and 100 T/ha) of compost. Compost and mineral fertilization significantly increased dry matter production. The application of 50 T/ha of compost alone increased the dry matter yield by 10 and 17.5\% while mineral nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium (NPK) increased yield by 69.7 and 65\% for Gao and Bgda, respectively. The combination of compost and mineral NPK (NPK + C-25 for Gao and NPK + C-50 for Bgda) affected the highest dry matter yield. For both soils, N concentrations in plants increased significantly with compost rate. Phosphorus and K concentrations in plants varied according to the soil. The application of compost increased the uptake of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and potassium (K from both soils). Increases in soil organic carbon, available P, calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, K, and pH were observed in treatments receiving compost. Therefore, compost appeared to be a good supplier of nutrients for tropical soils.},
  author       = {Soumare, M and Tack, Filip and Verloo, Marc},
  issn         = {0190-4167},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION},
  keyword      = {rye grass,greenhouse,municipal solid waste compost,Hoagland's solution,Mali,CHEMICAL-PROPERTIES,SEWAGE-SLUDGE,HEAVY-METALS,MANURE COMPOST,WEST-AFRICA,AVAILABILITY,PHOSPHORUS,PRODUCTIVITY,MANAGEMENT,SYSTEM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1169--1188},
  title        = {Ryegrass response to mineral fertilization and organic amendment with municipal solid waste compost in two tropical agricultural soils of Mali},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1081/PLN-120020363},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2003},
}

Chicago
Soumare, M, Filip Tack, and Marc Verloo. 2003. “Ryegrass Response to Mineral Fertilization and Organic Amendment with Municipal Solid Waste Compost in Two Tropical Agricultural Soils of Mali.” Journal of Plant Nutrition 26 (6): 1169–1188.
APA
Soumare, M., Tack, F., & Verloo, M. (2003). Ryegrass response to mineral fertilization and organic amendment with municipal solid waste compost in two tropical agricultural soils of Mali. JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION, 26(6), 1169–1188.
Vancouver
1.
Soumare M, Tack F, Verloo M. Ryegrass response to mineral fertilization and organic amendment with municipal solid waste compost in two tropical agricultural soils of Mali. JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION. 2003;26(6):1169–88.
MLA
Soumare, M, Filip Tack, and Marc Verloo. “Ryegrass Response to Mineral Fertilization and Organic Amendment with Municipal Solid Waste Compost in Two Tropical Agricultural Soils of Mali.” JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION 26.6 (2003): 1169–1188. Print.