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Do propagation methods affect the fine root architecture of Africa plum (Dacryodes edulis)?

Asaah Ebenezar Kutchambi UGent, TN Wanduku, Zac Tchoundjeu, L Kouodiekong and Patrick Van Damme UGent (2012) TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION. 26(5). p.1461-1469
abstract
Belowground tree growth attributes determine whether associations will be complementary or competitive in an agroforestry context. A study on fine root (d a parts per thousand currency sign 2 mm) distribution patterns of Dacryodes edulis based on root density (RD), root length density (RLD) and root weight density (RWD) was conducted to evaluate the effect of propagation methods on rooting distribution. Results showed that D. edulis trees of seed origin had greater RD (P a parts per thousand currency sign 0.001) than trees of vegetative origin (cuttings and marcots) in the upper soil stratum (0-30 cm). Similarly, in the uppermost soil stratum (0-10 cm), RLD and RWDs varied significantly (P < 0.01). Trees of seed origin had an exponential distribution pattern for fine RD, RLD and RWD with depth to 80 cm. In contrast, the distribution pattern of fine roots of trees of vegetative origin (cuttings and marcots) were quadratic for the same variables which increased in the 20-30 cm soil depth stratum before declining steadily to a depth of 80 cm. The findings of this study suggest that D. edulis trees of vegetative origin (cuttings and marots) are likely to be less competitive than trees of seed origin when intercropped with shallow-rooted annual plants in an agroforestry system for belowground resources.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Agroforestry, Indigenous fruit tree, Fine roots, Propagation methods, TREE-CROP INTERACTIONS, AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS, IRVINGIA-GABONENSIS, INDIGENOUS FRUITS, CAMEROON, DOMESTICATION, MANAGEMENT, FARMERS, COFFEE
journal title
TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
Trees-Struct. Funct.
volume
26
issue
5
pages
1461 - 1469
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000308860500005
JCR category
FORESTRY
JCR impact factor
1.925 (2012)
JCR rank
10/60 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0931-1890
DOI
10.1007/s00468-012-0720-9
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2753535
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2753535
date created
2012-06-18 15:18:16
date last changed
2013-07-12 11:37:08
@article{2753535,
  abstract     = {Belowground tree growth attributes determine whether associations will be complementary or competitive in an agroforestry context. A study on fine root (d a parts per thousand currency sign 2 mm) distribution patterns of Dacryodes edulis based on root density (RD), root length density (RLD) and root weight density (RWD) was conducted to evaluate the effect of propagation methods on rooting distribution. Results showed that D. edulis trees of seed origin had greater RD (P a parts per thousand currency sign 0.001) than trees of vegetative origin (cuttings and marcots) in the upper soil stratum (0-30 cm). Similarly, in the uppermost soil stratum (0-10 cm), RLD and RWDs varied significantly (P {\textlangle} 0.01). Trees of seed origin had an exponential distribution pattern for fine RD, RLD and RWD with depth to 80 cm. In contrast, the distribution pattern of fine roots of trees of vegetative origin (cuttings and marcots) were quadratic for the same variables which increased in the 20-30 cm soil depth stratum before declining steadily to a depth of 80 cm. The findings of this study suggest that D. edulis trees of vegetative origin (cuttings and marots) are likely to be less competitive than trees of seed origin when intercropped with shallow-rooted annual plants in an agroforestry system for belowground resources.},
  author       = {Ebenezar Kutchambi, Asaah and Wanduku, TN and Tchoundjeu, Zac and Kouodiekong, L and Van Damme, Patrick},
  issn         = {0931-1890},
  journal      = {TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION},
  keyword      = {Agroforestry,Indigenous fruit tree,Fine roots,Propagation methods,TREE-CROP INTERACTIONS,AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS,IRVINGIA-GABONENSIS,INDIGENOUS FRUITS,CAMEROON,DOMESTICATION,MANAGEMENT,FARMERS,COFFEE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1461--1469},
  title        = {Do propagation methods affect the fine root architecture of Africa plum (Dacryodes edulis)?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00468-012-0720-9},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Ebenezar Kutchambi, Asaah, TN Wanduku, Zac Tchoundjeu, L Kouodiekong, and Patrick Van Damme. 2012. “Do Propagation Methods Affect the Fine Root Architecture of Africa Plum (Dacryodes Edulis)?” Trees-structure and Function 26 (5): 1461–1469.
APA
Ebenezar Kutchambi, A., Wanduku, T., Tchoundjeu, Z., Kouodiekong, L., & Van Damme, P. (2012). Do propagation methods affect the fine root architecture of Africa plum (Dacryodes edulis)? TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION, 26(5), 1461–1469.
Vancouver
1.
Ebenezar Kutchambi A, Wanduku T, Tchoundjeu Z, Kouodiekong L, Van Damme P. Do propagation methods affect the fine root architecture of Africa plum (Dacryodes edulis)? TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION. 2012;26(5):1461–9.
MLA
Ebenezar Kutchambi, Asaah, TN Wanduku, Zac Tchoundjeu, et al. “Do Propagation Methods Affect the Fine Root Architecture of Africa Plum (Dacryodes Edulis)?” TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION 26.5 (2012): 1461–1469. Print.