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Reliability of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for measuring forearm oxygenation during incremental handgrip exercise

Bert Celie UGent, Jan Boone UGent, Rudy Van Coster UGent and Jan Bourgois UGent (2012) EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY. 112(6). p.2369-2374
abstract
The purpose of this study was to test the reliability of a new handgrip exercise protocol measuring forearm oxygenation in 20 healthy subjects on two occasions. The retest took place 48 h later and at the same time of the day. The incremental exercise consisted of 2 min steps of cyclic handgrip contraction (1/2 Hz) separated by 1 min of recovery. The exercise started at 20% MVC, was increased with 10% MVC each step and was performed until exhaustion (69.5 and 73% MVC). Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to measure deoxygenation (deoxy[Hb + Mb]) and oxygen saturation (SmO2) in the forearm muscles. Prior to the exercise protocol an arterial occlusion of the forearm was performed until deoxy(Hb + Mb) did no longer increase. Maximal increase in deoxy[Hb + Mb] during 10 s of each exercise bout was expressed relative to the occlusion amplitude. ICC was used to examine the test-retest reliability. Significant ICC's were reported at 50% ( = 0.466, = 0.017) and 60% MVC ( = 0.553, = 0.005). The group mean of the maximum increase in oxygen extraction was 45.6 +/- A 16.7% and at the retest 44.9 +/- A 17.0% with an ICC of = 0.867 ( < 0.001) which could be classified (Landis and Koch 1979) as almost perfect. The absolute SmO2 values showed reliable ICC's for every submaximal intensity except at 60% MVC. An ICC of = 0.774 ( < 0.001) was found at maximal intensity. The results of the present study show that deoxy[Hb + Mb] and SmO2 responses during this protocol are highly reliable and indicate that this protocol could be used to get insight into deoxygenation and oxygen saturation in a population with low exercise tolerance.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SmO2, Cyclic contraction, O-2-extraction, Forearm muscle, MUSCLE, Deoxy[Hb plus Mb], BLOOD-VOLUME, HUMANS, RESPONSES
journal title
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
volume
112
issue
6
pages
2369 - 2374
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000304141600037
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.66 (2012)
JCR rank
12/84 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
1439-6319
DOI
10.1007/s00421-011-2183-x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2646264
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2646264
date created
2012-06-18 13:55:36
date last changed
2012-06-20 15:42:57
@article{2646264,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this study was to test the reliability of a new handgrip exercise protocol measuring forearm oxygenation in 20 healthy subjects on two occasions. The retest took place 48 h later and at the same time of the day. The incremental exercise consisted of 2 min steps of cyclic handgrip contraction (1/2 Hz) separated by 1 min of recovery. The exercise started at 20\% MVC, was increased with 10\% MVC each step and was performed until exhaustion (69.5 and 73\% MVC). Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to measure deoxygenation (deoxy[Hb + Mb]) and oxygen saturation (SmO2) in the forearm muscles. Prior to the exercise protocol an arterial occlusion of the forearm was performed until deoxy(Hb + Mb) did no longer increase. Maximal increase in deoxy[Hb + Mb] during 10 s of each exercise bout was expressed relative to the occlusion amplitude. ICC was used to examine the test-retest reliability. Significant ICC's were reported at 50\% ( = 0.466, = 0.017) and 60\% MVC ( = 0.553, = 0.005). The group mean of the maximum increase in oxygen extraction was 45.6 +/- A 16.7\% and at the retest 44.9 +/- A 17.0\% with an ICC of = 0.867 ( {\textlangle} 0.001) which could be classified (Landis and Koch 1979) as almost perfect. The absolute SmO2 values showed reliable ICC's for every submaximal intensity except at 60\% MVC. An ICC of = 0.774 ( {\textlangle} 0.001) was found at maximal intensity. The results of the present study show that deoxy[Hb + Mb] and SmO2 responses during this protocol are highly reliable and indicate that this protocol could be used to get insight into deoxygenation and oxygen saturation in a population with low exercise tolerance.},
  author       = {Celie, Bert and Boone, Jan and Van Coster, Rudy and Bourgois, Jan},
  issn         = {1439-6319},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {SmO2,Cyclic contraction,O-2-extraction,Forearm muscle,MUSCLE,Deoxy[Hb plus Mb],BLOOD-VOLUME,HUMANS,RESPONSES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {2369--2374},
  title        = {Reliability of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for measuring forearm oxygenation during incremental handgrip exercise},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-011-2183-x},
  volume       = {112},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Celie, Bert, Jan Boone, Rudy Van Coster, and Jan Bourgois. 2012. “Reliability of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for Measuring Forearm Oxygenation During Incremental Handgrip Exercise.” European Journal of Applied Physiology 112 (6): 2369–2374.
APA
Celie, B., Boone, J., Van Coster, R., & Bourgois, J. (2012). Reliability of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for measuring forearm oxygenation during incremental handgrip exercise. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, 112(6), 2369–2374.
Vancouver
1.
Celie B, Boone J, Van Coster R, Bourgois J. Reliability of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for measuring forearm oxygenation during incremental handgrip exercise. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY. 2012;112(6):2369–74.
MLA
Celie, Bert, Jan Boone, Rudy Van Coster, et al. “Reliability of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for Measuring Forearm Oxygenation During Incremental Handgrip Exercise.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY 112.6 (2012): 2369–2374. Print.