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Lactic acid bacteria and bacteriocins : their practical importance

Author
Organization
Abstract
Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive, non-sporulating microaerophilic bacteria whose main fermentation product from carbohydrates is lactate. The lactic acid bacteria comprise both cocci (Lactococcus, Vagococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Aerococcus, Tetragenococcus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus) and rods (Lactobacillus, Carnobacterium, Bifidobacterium). Phylogenetically they are members of the Clostridium-Bacillus subdivision of Gram-positive eubacteria. The genus Bifidobacterium, frequently grouped with the lactobacilli, is the most ancient group of the second subdivision of the Gram-positive eubacteria, the Actinomycetes. In addition, Propionibacteria, microbacteria and brevibacteria belong to this subdivision but the latter organisms appear as offshoots of non-lactic acid bacteria (Stackebrandt & Teuber, 1988). For detailed information on the biochemistry, physiology and plasmid biology of lactic acid bacteria, the reader is referred to the reviews of Kandier (1983), Law & Kolstad (1983), McKay (1983, 1985), Teuber & Lembke (1983), Condon (1987), Kashket (1987), Klaenhammer (1987), Thomas & Pritchard (1987), Thompson (1987, 1988), Kok & Venema (1988), Mata & Ritzenthaler (1988), Sanders (1988), Konings et al. (1989), Davidson et al. (1990), Kok (1990), Maloney (1990), Hill (1993), Poolman (1993) and Pritchard & Coolbear (1993).
Keywords
Lactic Acid Bacterium, Starter Culture, Fermented Food, Bacteriocin Production, Food Preservation

Citation

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MLA
De Vuyst, Luc, and Erick Vandamme. “Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bacteriocins : Their Practical Importance.” Bacteriocins of Lactic Acid Bacteria : Microbiology, Genetics and Applications, edited by Luc De Vuyst and Erick Vandamme, Blackie Academic & Professional, 1994, pp. 1–11, doi:10.1007/978-1-4615-2668-1_1.
APA
De Vuyst, L., & Vandamme, E. (1994). Lactic acid bacteria and bacteriocins : their practical importance. In L. De Vuyst & E. Vandamme (Eds.), Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria : microbiology, genetics and applications (pp. 1–11). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2668-1_1
Chicago author-date
De Vuyst, Luc, and Erick Vandamme. 1994. “Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bacteriocins : Their Practical Importance.” In Bacteriocins of Lactic Acid Bacteria : Microbiology, Genetics and Applications, edited by Luc De Vuyst and Erick Vandamme, 1–11. London: Blackie Academic & Professional. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2668-1_1.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Vuyst, Luc, and Erick Vandamme. 1994. “Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bacteriocins : Their Practical Importance.” In Bacteriocins of Lactic Acid Bacteria : Microbiology, Genetics and Applications, ed by. Luc De Vuyst and Erick Vandamme, 1–11. London: Blackie Academic & Professional. doi:10.1007/978-1-4615-2668-1_1.
Vancouver
1.
De Vuyst L, Vandamme E. Lactic acid bacteria and bacteriocins : their practical importance. In: De Vuyst L, Vandamme E, editors. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria : microbiology, genetics and applications. London: Blackie Academic & Professional; 1994. p. 1–11.
IEEE
[1]
L. De Vuyst and E. Vandamme, “Lactic acid bacteria and bacteriocins : their practical importance,” in Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria : microbiology, genetics and applications, L. De Vuyst and E. Vandamme, Eds. London: Blackie Academic & Professional, 1994, pp. 1–11.
@incollection{247788,
  abstract     = {{Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive, non-sporulating microaerophilic bacteria whose main fermentation product from carbohydrates is lactate. The lactic acid bacteria comprise both cocci (Lactococcus, Vagococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Aerococcus, Tetragenococcus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus) and rods (Lactobacillus, Carnobacterium, Bifidobacterium). Phylogenetically they are members of the Clostridium-Bacillus subdivision of Gram-positive eubacteria. The genus Bifidobacterium, frequently grouped with the lactobacilli, is the most ancient group of the second subdivision of the Gram-positive eubacteria, the Actinomycetes. In addition, Propionibacteria, microbacteria and brevibacteria belong to this subdivision but the latter organisms appear as offshoots of non-lactic acid bacteria (Stackebrandt & Teuber, 1988). For detailed information on the biochemistry, physiology and plasmid biology of lactic acid bacteria, the reader is referred to the reviews of Kandier (1983), Law & Kolstad (1983), McKay (1983, 1985), Teuber & Lembke (1983), Condon (1987), Kashket (1987), Klaenhammer (1987), Thomas & Pritchard (1987), Thompson (1987, 1988), Kok & Venema (1988), Mata & Ritzenthaler (1988), Sanders (1988), Konings et al. (1989), Davidson et al. (1990), Kok (1990), Maloney (1990), Hill (1993), Poolman (1993) and Pritchard & Coolbear (1993).}},
  author       = {{De Vuyst, Luc and Vandamme, Erick}},
  booktitle    = {{Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria : microbiology, genetics and applications}},
  editor       = {{De Vuyst, Luc and Vandamme, Erick}},
  isbn         = {{9780751401745}},
  keywords     = {{Lactic Acid Bacterium,Starter Culture,Fermented Food,Bacteriocin Production,Food Preservation}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{1--11}},
  publisher    = {{Blackie Academic & Professional}},
  title        = {{Lactic acid bacteria and bacteriocins : their practical importance}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2668-1_1}},
  year         = {{1994}},
}

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