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Clinical aspects during long-term follow-up after DC shock ablation of the atrioventricular junction: a Belgian experience

(1993) ACTA CARDIOLOGICA. 48(2). p.199-208
Author
Organization
Abstract
Ninety-three patients, who underwent DC shock ablation were reviewed over a mean follow-up period of 54 months (range 3 to 84 months). These patients (46 male and 47 female, mean age: 58 years) had failed an average of 3 drugs, and the duration of symptoms was more than 2 years. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or flutter was treated in 75 patients (80.6 %) ; the remainder had supraventricular tachycardia or reciprocating tachycardia using an accessory pathway. One shock of 200 J was effective in producing third degree AV block in 40 patients (43 %), while 2 or more shocks were used in another 53 patients (57 %). Chronic complete heart block (CHB) was obtained in 85 patients (91 %), modification of conduction was seen in 2 patients (2.1 %), and failure to achieve an improvement in 6 patients (6.4). All the patients of the last group had received more than 4 shocks (200 to 400 J). However no significant difference between the amplitude of atrial and His electrograms could be shown between the CHB patients and those in whom conduction persisted. Over a mean follow-up of 54 months, 66 patients (72 %) with successful ablation during the first 48 hours after the procedure remained in CHB. In 18 patients AV conduction resumed but they were all asymptomatic: 10 patients (10.8 %) without antiarrhythmic therapy and 8 patients (8.6 %) with medication. In conclusion, ablation of the AV junction is effective in more than 82 % of patients. Most of the time long-term success can be predicted within 48 hours. However, due to the invasive character of DC shocks, this technique has been supplanted by the less aggressive radiofrequency method.
Keywords
LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP, DC SHOCK ABLATION, SUPRAVENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, ANTIARRHYTHMIC TREATMENT

Citation

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Chicago
Nzayinambaho, K, A Aubert, Luc Jordaens, H Ector, A Waleffe, H De Geest, Denis Clement, and H Kulbertus. 1993. “Clinical Aspects During Long-term Follow-up After DC Shock Ablation of the Atrioventricular Junction: a Belgian Experience.” Acta Cardiologica 48 (2): 199–208.
APA
Nzayinambaho, K., Aubert, A., Jordaens, L., Ector, H., Waleffe, A., De Geest, H., Clement, D., et al. (1993). Clinical aspects during long-term follow-up after DC shock ablation of the atrioventricular junction: a Belgian experience. ACTA CARDIOLOGICA, 48(2), 199–208.
Vancouver
1.
Nzayinambaho K, Aubert A, Jordaens L, Ector H, Waleffe A, De Geest H, et al. Clinical aspects during long-term follow-up after DC shock ablation of the atrioventricular junction: a Belgian experience. ACTA CARDIOLOGICA. 1993;48(2):199–208.
MLA
Nzayinambaho, K, A Aubert, Luc Jordaens, et al. “Clinical Aspects During Long-term Follow-up After DC Shock Ablation of the Atrioventricular Junction: a Belgian Experience.” ACTA CARDIOLOGICA 48.2 (1993): 199–208. Print.
@article{234430,
  abstract     = {Ninety-three patients, who underwent DC shock ablation were reviewed over a mean follow-up period of 54 months (range 3 to 84 months). 
These patients (46 male and 47 female, mean age: 58 years) had failed an average of 3 drugs, and the duration of symptoms was more than 2 years. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or flutter was treated in 75 patients (80.6 \%) ; the remainder had supraventricular tachycardia or reciprocating tachycardia using an accessory pathway. One shock of 200 J was effective in producing third degree AV block in 40 patients (43 \%), while 2 or more shocks were used in another 53 patients (57 \%). Chronic complete heart block (CHB) was obtained in 85 patients (91 \%), modification of conduction was seen in 2 patients (2.1 \%), and failure to achieve an improvement in 6 patients (6.4). All the patients of the last group had received more than 4 shocks (200 to 400 J). However no significant difference between the amplitude of atrial and His electrograms could be shown between the CHB patients and those in whom conduction persisted. 
Over a mean follow-up of 54 months, 66 patients (72 \%) with successful ablation during the first 48 hours after the procedure remained in CHB. In 18 patients AV conduction resumed but they were all asymptomatic: 10 patients (10.8 \%) without antiarrhythmic therapy and 8 patients (8.6 \%) with medication. 
In conclusion, ablation of the AV junction is effective in more than 82 \% of patients. Most of the time long-term success can be predicted within 48 hours. However, due to the invasive character of DC shocks, this technique has been supplanted by the less aggressive radiofrequency method.},
  author       = {Nzayinambaho, K and Aubert, A and Jordaens, Luc and Ector, H and Waleffe, A and De Geest, H and Clement, Denis and Kulbertus, H},
  issn         = {0001-5385},
  journal      = {ACTA CARDIOLOGICA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {199--208},
  title        = {Clinical aspects during long-term follow-up after DC shock ablation of the atrioventricular junction: a Belgian experience},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {1993},
}