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Priority effects and species sorting in a long paleoecological record of repeated community assembly through time

Joachim Mergeay, Luc De Meester, Hilde Eggermont UGent and Dirk Verschuren UGent (2011) ECOLOGY. 92(12). p.2267-2275
abstract
We studied the relative roles of environmental species sorting and priority effects in the assembly of ecological communities on long time scales, by analyzing community turnover of water fleas (Daphnia) in response to strong and recurrent environmental change in a fluctuating tropical lake. During the past 1800 years, Lake Naivasha (Kenya) repeatedly fluctuated between a small saline pond habitat during lowstands and a large freshwater lake habitat during highstands. Starting from a paleoecological reconstruction, we estimated the role of priority effects in Daphnia community assembly across 16 of these habitat turnovers and compared this with the response of the community to reconstructed changes in three environmental variables important for species sorting. Our results indicate that the best predictor of Daphnia community composition during highstands was the community composition just prior to the transition from lowstands to highstands. This reflects a long-lasting priority effect of late lowstand communities on highstand communities, arising when remnant lowstand populations fill newly available ecological space in the rapidly expanding lake habitat. Species sorting and priority effects had a comparable but relatively small influence on community composition during the lowstands. Moreover, these priority effects decayed rapidly with time as Daphnia communities responded to environmental change, in contrast with the highstand communities where priority effects lasted for several decades.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Daphnia spp., community assembly, Lake Naivasha, Kenya, mass effect, metacommunity, niche, paleoecology, priority effect, propagule pressure, restoration ecology, storage effect, LAKE NAIVASHA, ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES, TEMPORAL VARIATION, DAPHNIA COMMUNITY, TROPICAL LAKE, ZOOPLANKTON, KENYA, METACOMMUNITY, DISPERSAL, DIVERSITY
journal title
ECOLOGY
Ecology
volume
92
issue
12
pages
2267 - 2275
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000298981300014
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.849 (2011)
JCR rank
19/130 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0012-9658
DOI
10.1890/10-1645.1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2308661
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2308661
date created
2012-06-16 10:43:06
date last changed
2012-06-28 10:50:33
@article{2308661,
  abstract     = {We studied the relative roles of environmental species sorting and priority effects in the assembly of ecological communities on long time scales, by analyzing community turnover of water fleas (Daphnia) in response to strong and recurrent environmental change in a fluctuating tropical lake. During the past 1800 years, Lake Naivasha (Kenya) repeatedly fluctuated between a small saline pond habitat during lowstands and a large freshwater lake habitat during highstands. Starting from a paleoecological reconstruction, we estimated the role of priority effects in Daphnia community assembly across 16 of these habitat turnovers and compared this with the response of the community to reconstructed changes in three environmental variables important for species sorting. 
Our results indicate that the best predictor of Daphnia community composition during highstands was the community composition just prior to the transition from lowstands to highstands. This reflects a long-lasting priority effect of late lowstand communities on highstand communities, arising when remnant lowstand populations fill newly available ecological space in the rapidly expanding lake habitat. Species sorting and priority effects had a comparable but relatively small influence on community composition during the lowstands. Moreover, these priority effects decayed rapidly with time as Daphnia communities responded to environmental change, in contrast with the highstand communities where priority effects lasted for several decades.},
  author       = {Mergeay, Joachim and De Meester, Luc and Eggermont, Hilde and Verschuren, Dirk},
  issn         = {0012-9658},
  journal      = {ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Daphnia spp.,community assembly,Lake Naivasha,Kenya,mass effect,metacommunity,niche,paleoecology,priority effect,propagule pressure,restoration ecology,storage effect,LAKE NAIVASHA,ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES,TEMPORAL VARIATION,DAPHNIA COMMUNITY,TROPICAL LAKE,ZOOPLANKTON,KENYA,METACOMMUNITY,DISPERSAL,DIVERSITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {2267--2275},
  title        = {Priority effects and species sorting in a long paleoecological record of repeated community assembly through time},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/10-1645.1},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Mergeay, Joachim, Luc De Meester, Hilde Eggermont, and Dirk Verschuren. 2011. “Priority Effects and Species Sorting in a Long Paleoecological Record of Repeated Community Assembly Through Time.” Ecology 92 (12): 2267–2275.
APA
Mergeay, J., De Meester, L., Eggermont, H., & Verschuren, D. (2011). Priority effects and species sorting in a long paleoecological record of repeated community assembly through time. ECOLOGY, 92(12), 2267–2275.
Vancouver
1.
Mergeay J, De Meester L, Eggermont H, Verschuren D. Priority effects and species sorting in a long paleoecological record of repeated community assembly through time. ECOLOGY. 2011;92(12):2267–75.
MLA
Mergeay, Joachim, Luc De Meester, Hilde Eggermont, et al. “Priority Effects and Species Sorting in a Long Paleoecological Record of Repeated Community Assembly Through Time.” ECOLOGY 92.12 (2011): 2267–2275. Print.