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Proceeding with clinical trials of animal to human organ transplantation: a way out of the dilemma

An Ravelingien (UGent) , Freddy Mortier (UGent) , Eric Mortier (UGent) , ILSE KERREMANS (UGent) and Johan Braeckman (UGent)
(2004) JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS. 30(1). p.92-98
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Organization
Abstract
The transplantation of porcine organs to humans could in the future be a solution to the worldwide organ shortage, but is to date still highly experimental. Further research on the potential effects of crossing the species barrier is essential before clinical application is acceptable. However, many crucial questions on efficacy and safety will ultimately only be answered by well designed and controlled solid organ xenotransplantation trials on humans. This paper is concerned with the question under which conditions, given the risks involved and the ethical issues raised, such clinical trials should be resumed. An alternative means of overcoming the safety and ethical issues is suggested: willed body donation for scientific research in the case of permanent vegetative status. This paper argues that conducting trials on such bodies with prior consent is preferable to the use of human subjects without lack of brain function.
Keywords
PORCINE ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRUS, PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE, NO EVIDENCE, MEDICAL ASPECTS, HUMAN-CELLS, NEWLY DEAD, XENOTRANSPLANTATION, INFECTION, BRAIN, PIGS

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Citation

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Chicago
Ravelingien, An, Freddy Mortier, Eric Mortier, ILSE KERREMANS, and Johan Braeckman. 2004. “Proceeding with Clinical Trials of Animal to Human Organ Transplantation: a Way Out of the Dilemma.” Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1): 92–98.
APA
Ravelingien, A., Mortier, F., Mortier, E., KERREMANS, I., & Braeckman, J. (2004). Proceeding with clinical trials of animal to human organ transplantation: a way out of the dilemma. JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS, 30(1), 92–98.
Vancouver
1.
Ravelingien A, Mortier F, Mortier E, KERREMANS I, Braeckman J. Proceeding with clinical trials of animal to human organ transplantation: a way out of the dilemma. JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS. 2004;30(1):92–8.
MLA
Ravelingien, An, Freddy Mortier, Eric Mortier, et al. “Proceeding with Clinical Trials of Animal to Human Organ Transplantation: a Way Out of the Dilemma.” JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS 30.1 (2004): 92–98. Print.
@article{218374,
  abstract     = {The transplantation of porcine organs to humans could in the future be a solution to the worldwide organ shortage, but is to date still highly experimental. Further research on the potential effects of crossing the species barrier is essential before clinical application is acceptable. However, many crucial questions on efficacy and safety will ultimately only be answered by well designed and controlled solid organ xenotransplantation trials on humans. This paper is concerned with the question under which conditions, given the risks involved and the ethical issues raised, such clinical trials should be resumed. An alternative means of overcoming the safety and ethical issues is suggested: willed body donation for scientific research in the case of permanent vegetative status. This paper argues that conducting trials on such bodies with prior consent is preferable to the use of human subjects without lack of brain function.},
  author       = {Ravelingien, An and Mortier, Freddy and Mortier, Eric and KERREMANS, ILSE and Braeckman, Johan},
  issn         = {0306-6800},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS},
  keyword      = {PORCINE ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRUS,PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE,NO EVIDENCE,MEDICAL ASPECTS,HUMAN-CELLS,NEWLY DEAD,XENOTRANSPLANTATION,INFECTION,BRAIN,PIGS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {92--98},
  title        = {Proceeding with clinical trials of animal to human organ transplantation: a way out of the dilemma},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.2003.004325},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2004},
}

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