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Nitrogen mineralisation from amended and unamended intensively managed tropical andisols and inceptisols

(2012) SOIL RESEARCH. 50(2). p.136-144
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Abstract
Intensive vegetable production systems throughout South East Asia are characterised by large nutrient inputs and low nitrogen (N) use efficiencies. In Indonesia, intensive vegetable production is concentrated on volcanic highland soils starting from an altitude of around 700 m above sea level. We measured potential N mineralisation from soil organic matter and from several representative organic materials in Andisols and Inceptisols with andic properties from Central Java, Indonesia. Unamended soils and soils amended with crop residues, animal manures, and compost were incubated during 3-4 months at 25 degrees C in the laboratory, then we monitored N mineralisation. Relative N mineralisation was significantly smaller in the Andisols (average 3.6 +/- 1.0%) than the Inceptisols (7.4 +/- 2.9%), and was negatively related to oxalate-extractable aluminium (Al-ox) (r = -0.749) and soil organic carbon (r = -0.705). This is probably due to the strong protection of organic matter (and organic N) by binding to active Al compounds. Net N mineralisation from the added organic materials was highly variable (ranging from 68.1% for the broccoli residues to 2.6% for tithonia compost), and was best related to the organic N content (r = 0.476). There were no significant correlations between net N mineralisation and biochemical fractions, which we attribute to the large variety of materials used in this study compared with previous studies. The data generated here on N mineralisation potential from soil organic matter, and from a variety of plant materials and animal manures that are commonly used in these intensive vegetable rotations, will allow for the rapid and efficient introduction of N fertiliser advice systems based on balance sheets.
Keywords
LAND-USE, QUALITY, N-MINERALIZATION, VEGETABLE CROP RESIDUES, SOIL ORGANIC-MATTER, vegetable rotations, soil organic matter, organic material, (bio)chemical fractionation, mineralisation rate, MANURE, DECOMPOSITION, ROTATIONS, RELEASE, LITTER

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Chicago
Ladiyani Retno, Widowati, Steven Sleutel, Diah Setyorini, Kris Sukristiyonubowo, and Stefaan De Neve. 2012. “Nitrogen Mineralisation from Amended and Unamended Intensively Managed Tropical Andisols and Inceptisols.” Soil Research 50 (2): 136–144.
APA
Ladiyani Retno, W., Sleutel, S., Setyorini, D., Sukristiyonubowo, K., & De Neve, S. (2012). Nitrogen mineralisation from amended and unamended intensively managed tropical andisols and inceptisols. SOIL RESEARCH, 50(2), 136–144.
Vancouver
1.
Ladiyani Retno W, Sleutel S, Setyorini D, Sukristiyonubowo K, De Neve S. Nitrogen mineralisation from amended and unamended intensively managed tropical andisols and inceptisols. SOIL RESEARCH. 2012;50(2):136–44.
MLA
Ladiyani Retno, Widowati, Steven Sleutel, Diah Setyorini, et al. “Nitrogen Mineralisation from Amended and Unamended Intensively Managed Tropical Andisols and Inceptisols.” SOIL RESEARCH 50.2 (2012): 136–144. Print.
@article{2153928,
  abstract     = {Intensive vegetable production systems throughout South East Asia are characterised by large nutrient inputs and low nitrogen (N) use efficiencies. In Indonesia, intensive vegetable production is concentrated on volcanic highland soils starting from an altitude of around 700 m above sea level. We measured potential N mineralisation from soil organic matter and from several representative organic materials in Andisols and Inceptisols with andic properties from Central Java, Indonesia. Unamended soils and soils amended with crop residues, animal manures, and compost were incubated during 3-4 months at 25 degrees C in the laboratory, then we monitored N mineralisation. Relative N mineralisation was significantly smaller in the Andisols (average 3.6 +/- 1.0\%) than the Inceptisols (7.4 +/- 2.9\%), and was negatively related to oxalate-extractable aluminium (Al-ox) (r = -0.749) and soil organic carbon (r = -0.705). This is probably due to the strong protection of organic matter (and organic N) by binding to active Al compounds. Net N mineralisation from the added organic materials was highly variable (ranging from 68.1\% for the broccoli residues to 2.6\% for tithonia compost), and was best related to the organic N content (r = 0.476). There were no significant correlations between net N mineralisation and biochemical fractions, which we attribute to the large variety of materials used in this study compared with previous studies. The data generated here on N mineralisation potential from soil organic matter, and from a variety of plant materials and animal manures that are commonly used in these intensive vegetable rotations, will allow for the rapid and efficient introduction of N fertiliser advice systems based on balance sheets.},
  author       = {Ladiyani Retno, Widowati and Sleutel, Steven and Setyorini, Diah and Sukristiyonubowo, Kris and De Neve, Stefaan},
  issn         = {1838-675X},
  journal      = {SOIL RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {LAND-USE,QUALITY,N-MINERALIZATION,VEGETABLE CROP RESIDUES,SOIL ORGANIC-MATTER,vegetable rotations,soil organic matter,organic material,(bio)chemical fractionation,mineralisation rate,MANURE,DECOMPOSITION,ROTATIONS,RELEASE,LITTER},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {136--144},
  title        = {Nitrogen mineralisation from amended and unamended intensively managed tropical andisols and inceptisols},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/SR11225},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2012},
}

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