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Job strain in relation to body mass index : pooled analysis of 160.000 adults from 13 cohort studies

(2012) JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE. 272(1). p.65-73
Author
Organization
Abstract
Background. Evidence of an association between job strain and obesity is inconsistent, mostly limited to small-scale studies, and does not distinguish between categories of underweight or obesity subclasses. Objectives. To examine the association between job strain and body mass index (BMI) in a large adult population. Methods. We performed a pooled cross-sectional analysis based on individual-level data from 13 European studies resulting in a total of 161 746 participants (49% men, mean age, 43.7 years). Longitudinal analysis with a median follow-up of 4 years was possible for four cohort studies (n = 42 222). Results. A total of 86 429 participants were of normal weight (BMI 18.524.9 kg m-2), 2149 were underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg m-2), 56 572 overweight (BMI 25.029.9 kg m-2) and 13 523 class I (BMI 3034.9 kg m-2) and 3073 classes II/III (BMI = 35 kg m-2) obese. In addition, 27 010 (17%) participants reported job strain. In cross-sectional analyses, we found increased odds of job strain amongst underweight [odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.001.25], obese class I (odds ratio 1.07, 95% CI 1.021.12) and obese classes II/III participants (odds ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.011.28) as compared with participants of normal weight. In longitudinal analysis, both weight gain and weight loss were related to the onset of job strain during follow-up. Conclusions. In an analysis of European data, we found both weight gain and weight loss to be associated with the onset of job strain, consistent with a U-shaped cross-sectional association between job strain and BMI. These associations were relatively modest; therefore, it is unlikely that intervention to reduce job strain would be effective in combating obesity at a population level.
Keywords
body mass index, cohort studies, job strain, obesity, thinness, work stress, CARDIOVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS, CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, WORK STRESS, WHITEHALL-II, PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, HEALTH BEHAVIORS, PUBLIC-SECTOR, WEIGHT-GAIN, METAANALYSIS, MORTALITY

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Chicago
Nyberg, ST, K Heikkilä, EI Fransson, L Alfredsson, Dirk De Bacquer, JB Bjorner, S Bonenfant, et al. 2012. “Job Strain in Relation to Body Mass Index : Pooled Analysis of 160.000 Adults from 13 Cohort Studies.” Journal of Internal Medicine 272 (1): 65–73.
APA
Nyberg, S., Heikkilä, K., Fransson, E., Alfredsson, L., De Bacquer, D., Bjorner, J., Bonenfant, S., et al. (2012). Job strain in relation to body mass index : pooled analysis of 160.000 adults from 13 cohort studies. JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, 272(1), 65–73.
Vancouver
1.
Nyberg S, Heikkilä K, Fransson E, Alfredsson L, De Bacquer D, Bjorner J, et al. Job strain in relation to body mass index : pooled analysis of 160.000 adults from 13 cohort studies. JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE. 2012;272(1):65–73.
MLA
Nyberg, ST, K Heikkilä, EI Fransson, et al. “Job Strain in Relation to Body Mass Index : Pooled Analysis of 160.000 Adults from 13 Cohort Studies.” JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE 272.1 (2012): 65–73. Print.
@article{2141000,
  abstract     = {Background. Evidence of an association between job strain and obesity is inconsistent, mostly limited to small-scale studies, and does not distinguish between categories of underweight or obesity subclasses.
Objectives. To examine the association between job strain and body mass index (BMI) in a large adult population.
Methods. We performed a pooled cross-sectional analysis based on individual-level data from 13 European studies resulting in a total of 161 746 participants (49\% men, mean age, 43.7 years). Longitudinal analysis with a median follow-up of 4 years was possible for four cohort studies (n = 42 222).
Results. A total of 86 429 participants were of normal weight (BMI 18.524.9 kg m-2), 2149 were underweight (BMI {\textlangle} 18.5 kg m-2), 56 572 overweight (BMI 25.029.9 kg m-2) and 13 523 class I (BMI 3034.9 kg m-2) and 3073 classes II/III (BMI = 35 kg m-2) obese. In addition, 27 010 (17\%) participants reported job strain. In cross-sectional analyses, we found increased odds of job strain amongst underweight [odds ratio 1.12, 95\% confidence interval (CI) 1.001.25], obese class I (odds ratio 1.07, 95\% CI 1.021.12) and obese classes II/III participants (odds ratio 1.14, 95\% CI 1.011.28) as compared with participants of normal weight. In longitudinal analysis, both weight gain and weight loss were related to the onset of job strain during follow-up.
Conclusions. In an analysis of European data, we found both weight gain and weight loss to be associated with the onset of job strain, consistent with a U-shaped cross-sectional association between job strain and BMI. These associations were relatively modest; therefore, it is unlikely that intervention to reduce job strain would be effective in combating obesity at a population level.},
  author       = {Nyberg, ST and Heikkil{\"a}, K and Fransson, EI and Alfredsson, L and De Bacquer, Dirk and Bjorner, JB and Bonenfant, S and Borritz, M and Burr, H and Casini, A and Clays, Els and Dragano, N and Erbel, R and Geuskens, GA and Goldberg, M and Hooftman, WE  and Houtman, IL and J{\"o}ckel, K-H and Kittel, F and Knutsson, A and Koskenvuo, M and Leineweber, C and Lunau, T and Madsen, IE and Magnusson Hanson, LL and Marmot, MG and Nielsen, ML and Nordin, M and Oksanen, T and Pentti, J and Rugulies, R and Siegrist, J and Suominen, S and Vahtera, J and Virtanen, M and Westerholm, P and Westerlund, H and Zins, M and Ferrie, JE and Theorell, T and Steptoe, A and Hamer, M and Singh-Manoux, A and Batty, GD and Kivim{\"a}ki, M and IPD-Work Consortium, the},
  issn         = {0954-6820},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {body mass index,cohort studies,job strain,obesity,thinness,work stress,CARDIOVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS,CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE,WORK STRESS,WHITEHALL-II,PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS,HEALTH BEHAVIORS,PUBLIC-SECTOR,WEIGHT-GAIN,METAANALYSIS,MORTALITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {65--73},
  title        = {Job strain in relation to body mass index : pooled analysis of 160.000 adults from 13 cohort studies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02482.x},
  volume       = {272},
  year         = {2012},
}

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