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Effect of egg washing on the cuticle quality of brown and white table eggs

S Leleu, W Messens, K De Reu, S De Preter, L Herman, Marc Heyndrickx UGent, J De Baerdemaeker, CW Michiels and M Bain (2011) JOURNAL OF FOOD PROTECTION. 74(10). p.1649-1654
abstract
Egg washing is currently not permitted within the European Union, with few exceptions. This is mainly because there are concerns that cuticle damage could occur during or after the washing process, as a result of a suboptimal operation. In this study, the cuticle coverage levels of 400 washed or unwashed eggs, derived from either a brown or a white egg laying flock at the end of lay, were compared. The eggs from older hens inherently have poorer cuticle coverage and as a result arguably constitute a greater risk to consumer safety if they are then washed. Thus, the effects of the washing procedure used in this study on cuticle quality were tested under the worst-case scenario. A standard Swedish egg washing process was used. The cuticle coverage of the eggs was assessed by a colorimeter by quantifying the color difference before and after staining with Tartrazine and Green S. The cuticle of an additional 30 eggs from each of the four groups was then visually assessed by scanning electron microscopy. The staining characteristics of the cuticle varied greatly within each group of eggs and showed that the washing process did not lead to cuticle damage. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that there was no irreversible damage to the cuticle of the washed eggs and that it was not possible to correctly assign the treatment (washed or not) based on a visual assessment. In conclusion, no evidence could be found to suggest that the washing procedure used in this investigation irreversibly changed the quality of the cuticle.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
MICROSTRUCTURE, SHELL, CONTAMINATION, ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS, TEMPERATURES, PENETRATION, BACTERIA, SALMONELLA
journal title
JOURNAL OF FOOD PROTECTION
J. Food Prot.
volume
74
issue
10
pages
1649 - 1654
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000296077400010
JCR category
FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.937 (2011)
JCR rank
35/128 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0362-028X
DOI
10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-013
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
id
2136844
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2136844
date created
2012-06-08 10:37:07
date last changed
2012-07-03 15:24:42
@article{2136844,
  abstract     = {Egg washing is currently not permitted within the European Union, with few exceptions. This is mainly because there are concerns that cuticle damage could occur during or after the washing process, as a result of a suboptimal operation. In this study, the cuticle coverage levels of 400 washed or unwashed eggs, derived from either a brown or a white egg laying flock at the end of lay, were compared. The eggs from older hens inherently have poorer cuticle coverage and as a result arguably constitute a greater risk to consumer safety if they are then washed. Thus, the effects of the washing procedure used in this study on cuticle quality were tested under the worst-case scenario. A standard Swedish egg washing process was used. The cuticle coverage of the eggs was assessed by a colorimeter by quantifying the color difference before and after staining with Tartrazine and Green S. The cuticle of an additional 30 eggs from each of the four groups was then visually assessed by scanning electron microscopy. The staining characteristics of the cuticle varied greatly within each group of eggs and showed that the washing process did not lead to cuticle damage. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that there was no irreversible damage to the cuticle of the washed eggs and that it was not possible to correctly assign the treatment (washed or not) based on a visual assessment. In conclusion, no evidence could be found to suggest that the washing procedure used in this investigation irreversibly changed the quality of the cuticle.},
  author       = {Leleu, S and Messens, W and De Reu, K and De Preter, S and Herman, L and Heyndrickx, Marc and De Baerdemaeker, J and Michiels, CW and Bain, M},
  issn         = {0362-028X},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF FOOD PROTECTION},
  keyword      = {MICROSTRUCTURE,SHELL,CONTAMINATION,ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS,TEMPERATURES,PENETRATION,BACTERIA,SALMONELLA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1649--1654},
  title        = {Effect of egg washing on the cuticle quality of brown and white table eggs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-013},
  volume       = {74},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Leleu, S, W Messens, K De Reu, S De Preter, L Herman, Marc Heyndrickx, J De Baerdemaeker, CW Michiels, and M Bain. 2011. “Effect of Egg Washing on the Cuticle Quality of Brown and White Table Eggs.” Journal of Food Protection 74 (10): 1649–1654.
APA
Leleu, S., Messens, W., De Reu, K., De Preter, S., Herman, L., Heyndrickx, M., De Baerdemaeker, J., et al. (2011). Effect of egg washing on the cuticle quality of brown and white table eggs. JOURNAL OF FOOD PROTECTION, 74(10), 1649–1654.
Vancouver
1.
Leleu S, Messens W, De Reu K, De Preter S, Herman L, Heyndrickx M, et al. Effect of egg washing on the cuticle quality of brown and white table eggs. JOURNAL OF FOOD PROTECTION. 2011;74(10):1649–54.
MLA
Leleu, S, W Messens, K De Reu, et al. “Effect of Egg Washing on the Cuticle Quality of Brown and White Table Eggs.” JOURNAL OF FOOD PROTECTION 74.10 (2011): 1649–1654. Print.