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Side effects of pesticides on the larvae of the hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus in the laboratory

Joachim Moens (UGent) , Patrick De Clercq (UGent) and Luc Tirry (UGent)
(2011) PHYTOPARASITICA. 39(1). p.1-9
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Abstract
The hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus (Degeer) is one of the most abundant predators of the cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae (L.)) in brussels sprouts in Belgium. In the current laboratory study, the toxicity of several insecticides applied at maximum recommended field rates was investigated on the larvae of E. balteatus. Two-to 3-day-old larvae were confined in glass petri dishes with dry residues of freshly applied insecticides. Their mortality was checked daily until adult emergence. Sub-lethal effects were investigated by assessing the reproductive performance of adult hoverflies, originating from the surviving larvae. Of the five compounds tested, only pirimicarb caused 100% larval mortality. The corrected mortality for spinosad was 60% and the adults obtained from the surviving larvae did not succeed in laying eggs. Therefore, pirimicarb and spinosad were rated "harmful" (International Organization for Biological and Integrated Control of Noxious Animals and Plants (IOBC) category 4) for the larvae of E. balteatus. In contrast, flonicamid, thiacloprid and spirotetramat yielded much lower mortality percentages. The hatching rate of hoverfly eggs treated with flonicamid was 25.6% vs 48.7% in the control. Hence, flonicamid was rated "slightly harmful" (IOBC category 2). The fertility of adults treated as larvae with thiacloprid or spirotetramat was not affected (IOBC category 1). These laboratory trials suggest that thiacloprid and spirotetramat can be used safely in integrated pest management programs to control the cabbage aphid. Pirimicarb, spinosad and flonicamid should be tested in semi-field and field situations to assess their toxicity under more realistic conditions.
Keywords
Pirimicarb, Brevicoryne brassicae, Flonicamid, Spinosad, Spirotetramat, Thiacloprid, CHRYSOPERLA-CARNEA STEPHENS, NATURAL ENEMIES, WINTER-WHEAT, BREVICORYNE-BRASSICAE, DIAMONDBACK MOTH, SYRPHID LARVAE, CEREAL APHIDS, INSECTICIDES, COLEOPTERA, COCCINELLIDAE

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Chicago
Moens, Joachim, Patrick De Clercq, and Luc Tirry. 2011. “Side Effects of Pesticides on the Larvae of the Hoverfly Episyrphus Balteatus in the Laboratory.” Phytoparasitica 39 (1): 1–9.
APA
Moens, Joachim, De Clercq, P., & Tirry, L. (2011). Side effects of pesticides on the larvae of the hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus in the laboratory. PHYTOPARASITICA, 39(1), 1–9.
Vancouver
1.
Moens J, De Clercq P, Tirry L. Side effects of pesticides on the larvae of the hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus in the laboratory. PHYTOPARASITICA. 2011;39(1):1–9.
MLA
Moens, Joachim, Patrick De Clercq, and Luc Tirry. “Side Effects of Pesticides on the Larvae of the Hoverfly Episyrphus Balteatus in the Laboratory.” PHYTOPARASITICA 39.1 (2011): 1–9. Print.
@article{2135539,
  abstract     = {The hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus (Degeer) is one of the most abundant predators of the cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae (L.)) in brussels sprouts in Belgium. In the current laboratory study, the toxicity of several insecticides applied at maximum recommended field rates was investigated on the larvae of E. balteatus. Two-to 3-day-old larvae were confined in glass petri dishes with dry residues of freshly applied insecticides. Their mortality was checked daily until adult emergence. Sub-lethal effects were investigated by assessing the reproductive performance of adult hoverflies, originating from the surviving larvae. Of the five compounds tested, only pirimicarb caused 100\% larval mortality. The corrected mortality for spinosad was 60\% and the adults obtained from the surviving larvae did not succeed in laying eggs. Therefore, pirimicarb and spinosad were rated {\textacutedbl}harmful{\textacutedbl} (International Organization for Biological and Integrated Control of Noxious Animals and Plants (IOBC) category 4) for the larvae of E. balteatus. In contrast, flonicamid, thiacloprid and spirotetramat yielded much lower mortality percentages. The hatching rate of hoverfly eggs treated with flonicamid was 25.6\% vs 48.7\% in the control. Hence, flonicamid was rated {\textacutedbl}slightly harmful{\textacutedbl} (IOBC category 2). The fertility of adults treated as larvae with thiacloprid or spirotetramat was not affected (IOBC category 1). These laboratory trials suggest that thiacloprid and spirotetramat can be used safely in integrated pest management programs to control the cabbage aphid. Pirimicarb, spinosad and flonicamid should be tested in semi-field and field situations to assess their toxicity under more realistic conditions.},
  author       = {Moens, Joachim and De Clercq, Patrick and Tirry, Luc},
  issn         = {0334-2123},
  journal      = {PHYTOPARASITICA},
  keyword      = {Pirimicarb,Brevicoryne brassicae,Flonicamid,Spinosad,Spirotetramat,Thiacloprid,CHRYSOPERLA-CARNEA STEPHENS,NATURAL ENEMIES,WINTER-WHEAT,BREVICORYNE-BRASSICAE,DIAMONDBACK MOTH,SYRPHID LARVAE,CEREAL APHIDS,INSECTICIDES,COLEOPTERA,COCCINELLIDAE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--9},
  title        = {Side effects of pesticides on the larvae of the hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus in the laboratory},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12600-010-0127-3},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2011},
}

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