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Can tree species choice influence recruitment of ancient forest species in post-agricultural forest?

Arno Thomaes UGent, Luc De Keersmaeker UGent, An De Schrijver UGent, Kris Vandekerkhove UGent, Pieter Verschelde and Kris Verheyen UGent (2011) PLANT ECOLOGY. 212(4). p.573-584
abstract
Germination and establishment of ancient forest species are bottlenecks in forest habitat restoration. We hypothesised that tree species can influence these processes on acidification sensitive soils through their effects on the soil. Seeds of seven ancient forest species were sown in soil collected in a post-agricultural forest under four different tree species, notably Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Fagus sylvatica and Populus x euramericana. Germination of four species was affected by tree species, while only Scilla non-scripta was indifferent and germination of Anemone nemorosa and Paris quadrifolia was unsuccessful. The acid intolerant Primula elatior only germinated in the soil of P. x euramericana but also the acid tolerant Lonicera periclymenum and Stellaria holostea performed best in the soil of P. x euramericana and worst in the soil of A. glutinosa. Lamium galeobdolon preferred the soil of A. pseudoplatanus. Germination of competitive seed bank species was much more successful in the soil of P. x euramericana than in soil of other tree species. From our results we deduce that tree species selection can affect germination of ancient forest species. Forest managers should be aware of the effects of tree species on their colonisation chances and favour trees with good decomposable litter especially on acidification sensitive soils.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Ecological restoration, Ancient woodland species, Recent forest, INTEGRATED ANALYSIS, TEMPERATE FORESTS, HERBACEOUS VEGETATION, UNDERSTORY VEGETATION, DISPERSAL LIMITATION, Understory recovery, Germination seasonality, WITH-STANDARDS FOREST, ANEMONE-NEMOROSA L, PAST LAND-USE, VASCULAR PLANTS, SOIL ACIDITY, Seed sowing experiment
journal title
PLANT ECOLOGY
Plant Ecol.
volume
212
issue
4
pages
573 - 584
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000288557700005
JCR category
FORESTRY
JCR impact factor
1.829 (2011)
JCR rank
8/59 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1385-0237
DOI
10.1007/s11258-010-9847-1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2129544
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2129544
date created
2012-06-01 20:47:09
date last changed
2012-06-12 09:56:22
@article{2129544,
  abstract     = {Germination and establishment of ancient forest species are bottlenecks in forest habitat restoration. We hypothesised that tree species can influence these processes on acidification sensitive soils through their effects on the soil. Seeds of seven ancient forest species were sown in soil collected in a post-agricultural forest under four different tree species, notably Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Fagus sylvatica and Populus x euramericana. Germination of four species was affected by tree species, while only Scilla non-scripta was indifferent and germination of Anemone nemorosa and Paris quadrifolia was unsuccessful. The acid intolerant Primula elatior only germinated in the soil of P. x euramericana but also the acid tolerant Lonicera periclymenum and Stellaria holostea performed best in the soil of P. x euramericana and worst in the soil of A. glutinosa. Lamium galeobdolon preferred the soil of A. pseudoplatanus. Germination of competitive seed bank species was much more successful in the soil of P. x euramericana than in soil of other tree species. From our results we deduce that tree species selection can affect germination of ancient forest species. Forest managers should be aware of the effects of tree species on their colonisation chances and favour trees with good decomposable litter especially on acidification sensitive soils.},
  author       = {Thomaes, Arno and De Keersmaeker, Luc and De Schrijver, An and Vandekerkhove, Kris and Verschelde, Pieter and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {1385-0237},
  journal      = {PLANT ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Ecological restoration,Ancient woodland species,Recent forest,INTEGRATED ANALYSIS,TEMPERATE FORESTS,HERBACEOUS VEGETATION,UNDERSTORY VEGETATION,DISPERSAL LIMITATION,Understory recovery,Germination seasonality,WITH-STANDARDS FOREST,ANEMONE-NEMOROSA L,PAST LAND-USE,VASCULAR PLANTS,SOIL ACIDITY,Seed sowing experiment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {573--584},
  title        = {Can tree species choice influence recruitment of ancient forest species in post-agricultural forest?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11258-010-9847-1},
  volume       = {212},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Thomaes, Arno, Luc De Keersmaeker, An De Schrijver, Kris Vandekerkhove, Pieter Verschelde, and Kris Verheyen. 2011. “Can Tree Species Choice Influence Recruitment of Ancient Forest Species in Post-agricultural Forest?” Plant Ecology 212 (4): 573–584.
APA
Thomaes, A., De Keersmaeker, L., De Schrijver, A., Vandekerkhove, K., Verschelde, P., & Verheyen, K. (2011). Can tree species choice influence recruitment of ancient forest species in post-agricultural forest? PLANT ECOLOGY, 212(4), 573–584.
Vancouver
1.
Thomaes A, De Keersmaeker L, De Schrijver A, Vandekerkhove K, Verschelde P, Verheyen K. Can tree species choice influence recruitment of ancient forest species in post-agricultural forest? PLANT ECOLOGY. 2011;212(4):573–84.
MLA
Thomaes, Arno, Luc De Keersmaeker, An De Schrijver, et al. “Can Tree Species Choice Influence Recruitment of Ancient Forest Species in Post-agricultural Forest?” PLANT ECOLOGY 212.4 (2011): 573–584. Print.