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Collagen moulding

Kim Ragaert UGent, Pamela Somers UGent, Filip De Somer UGent, Guido Van Nooten UGent, Ludwig Cardon UGent and Joris Degrieck UGent (2011) Biofuture 2011, Abstracts.
abstract
Objectives: For application as scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering, a method is researched to produce homogeneous thin collagen leaflets from commercially available collagen solutions. Materials and methods: Collagen Moulding is a rapid manufacturing method for the production of thin collagen leaflets by allowing a collagen solution to gel in an open mould, after which the gels are desiccated. Experiments were performed with an Apcoll (Devro, UK) collagen solution of 3 mg/ml; the mould cavities were designed for leaflet thickness values of 30 and 50 µm; they had a surface area of 12*12 mm². The scaffolds were visually inspected with a Keyence VHX 500 microscope and their mechanical properties were determined in a flexural indentation experiment, after which they were compared to natural valve cusps. All scaffolds were seeded with early passage (2 to 3) ovine mesenchymal stem cells; cell proliferation was quantified after 72 hours by means of an ELISA assay and histology. Results: The Collagen Moulding technique proved to yield structurally intact and reproducible collagen leaflets of 30 and 50 µm thickness. The scaffolds are stable in watery surroundings and can be stored under either dry or wet conditions. Although properties are observed to increase with scaffold thickness, the leaflets proved rather weak in terms of mechanical properties. The maximum load which they can withstand is only 10% of that of the natural cusp and their flexural stiffness parameter reaches a mere 20% of the value for the natural counterpart. Concerning cell proliferation, the ELISA assay yielded optical density values between 0.8 and 1 for all scaffolds, indicating good cell attachment to the surface. Histology results showed confluent cell layers on the collagen leaflets. While the collagen parts demonstrate auspicious results for cell proliferation, they are too weak mechanically to be conditioned as heart valve cusps. A strategy which would merit further investigation is combining these collagen gels with synthetic biocompatible polymers, which by themselves lack the necessary binding locations required for cell attachment. Using these polymers as a structural backbone, however, and coating them with a collagen top layer, would combine the most beneficial properties of both material classes. Conclusions: Thin leaflet scaffolds produced by Collagen Moulding display good cell interaction qualities but insufficient mechanical properties. For further research, hybrid scaffolds with a synthetic polymer backbone and a collagen top layer are considered.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
in
Biofuture 2011, Abstracts
conference name
Biofuture 2011 : Young European biomaterial scientists designing a view for the future
conference location
Ghent, Belgium
conference start
2011-11-16
conference end
2011-11-18
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
2128923
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2128923
date created
2012-06-01 13:46:50
date last changed
2012-06-04 08:56:40
@inproceedings{2128923,
  abstract     = {Objectives: For application as scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering, a method is researched to produce homogeneous thin collagen leaflets from commercially available collagen solutions. 
Materials and methods: Collagen Moulding is a rapid manufacturing method for the production of thin collagen leaflets by allowing a collagen solution to gel in an open mould, after which the gels are desiccated. Experiments were performed with an Apcoll (Devro, UK) collagen solution  of 3 mg/ml; the mould cavities were designed for leaflet thickness values of 30 and 50 {\textmu}m; they had a surface area of 12*12 mm{\texttwosuperior}. 
The scaffolds were visually inspected with a Keyence VHX 500 microscope and their mechanical properties were determined in a flexural indentation experiment, after which they were compared to natural valve cusps. 
All scaffolds were seeded with early passage (2 to 3) ovine mesenchymal stem cells; cell proliferation was quantified after 72 hours by means of an ELISA assay and histology.  
Results: The Collagen Moulding technique proved to yield structurally intact and reproducible collagen leaflets of 30 and 50 {\textmu}m thickness. The scaffolds are stable in watery surroundings and can be stored under either dry or wet conditions. Although properties are observed to increase with scaffold thickness, the leaflets proved rather weak in terms of mechanical properties. The maximum load which they can withstand is only 10\% of that of the natural cusp and their flexural stiffness parameter reaches a mere 20\% of the value for the natural counterpart. 
Concerning cell proliferation, the ELISA assay yielded optical density values between 0.8 and 1 for all scaffolds, indicating  good cell attachment to the surface. Histology results showed confluent cell layers on the collagen leaflets. 
While the collagen parts demonstrate auspicious results for cell proliferation, they are too weak mechanically to  be conditioned as heart valve cusps. A strategy which would merit further investigation is combining these collagen gels with synthetic biocompatible polymers, which by themselves lack the necessary binding locations required for cell attachment. Using these polymers as a structural backbone, however, and coating them with a collagen top layer, would combine the most beneficial properties of both material classes. 
Conclusions: Thin leaflet scaffolds produced by Collagen Moulding display good cell interaction qualities but insufficient  mechanical properties. For further research, hybrid scaffolds with a synthetic polymer backbone and a collagen top layer are considered.},
  author       = {Ragaert, Kim and Somers, Pamela and De Somer, Filip and Van Nooten, Guido and Cardon, Ludwig and Degrieck, Joris},
  booktitle    = {Biofuture 2011, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  title        = {Collagen moulding},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Ragaert, Kim, Pamela Somers, Filip De Somer, Guido Van Nooten, Ludwig Cardon, and Joris Degrieck. 2011. “Collagen Moulding.” In Biofuture 2011, Abstracts.
APA
Ragaert, K., Somers, P., De Somer, F., Van Nooten, G., Cardon, L., & Degrieck, J. (2011). Collagen moulding. Biofuture 2011, Abstracts. Presented at the Biofuture 2011 : Young European biomaterial scientists designing a view for the future.
Vancouver
1.
Ragaert K, Somers P, De Somer F, Van Nooten G, Cardon L, Degrieck J. Collagen moulding. Biofuture 2011, Abstracts. 2011.
MLA
Ragaert, Kim, Pamela Somers, Filip De Somer, et al. “Collagen Moulding.” Biofuture 2011, Abstracts. 2011. Print.