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Ontogeny of the cranial system in Laonastes anigmamus

Anthony Herrel, Anne-Claire Fabre, Jean-Pierre Hugot, Kam Keovichit, Dominique Adriaens UGent, Loes Brabant UGent, Luc Van Hoorebeke UGent and Raphael Cornette (2012) JOURNAL OF ANATOMY. 221(2). p.128-137
abstract
Rodents, together with bats, are among the ecologically most diverse and most speciose groups of mammals. Moreover, rodents show elaborate specializations of the feeding apparatus in response to the predominantly fore-aft movements of the lower jaw. The Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus was recently discovered and originally thought to belong to a new family. The difficulties in classifying L. aenigmamus based on morphological characters stem from the fact that it presents a mixture of sciurognathous and hystricognathous characteristics, including the morphology of the jaw adductors. The origin of the unusual muscular organization in this species remains, however, unclear. Here, we investigate the development of the masticatory system in Laonastes to better understand the origin of its derived morphology relative to other rodents. Our analyses show that skull and mandible development is characterized by an overall elongation of the snout region. Muscle mass increases with positive allometry during development and growth, and so does the force-generating capacity of the jaw adductor muscles (i.e. physiological cross-sectional area). Whereas fetal crania and musculature are more similar to those of typical rodents, adults diverge in the elongation of the rostral part of the skull and the disproportionate development of the zygomaticomandibularis. Our data suggest a functional signal in the development of the unusual cranial morphology, possibly associated with the folivorous trophic ecology of the species.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
RODENTIA, HETEROCHRONY, MORPHOLOGY, BITE FORCE, ALBINO-RAT, MASTICATORY MUSCLE ARCHITECTURE, skull, scaling, ontogeny, mammal, jaw muscle, feeding, OSSIFICATION, EVOLUTION, PATTERNS, MUSCULATURE
journal title
JOURNAL OF ANATOMY
J. Anat.
volume
221
issue
2
pages
128 - 137
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000305897300004
ISSN
1469-7580
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-7580.2012.01519.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2125910
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2125910
date created
2012-05-31 18:30:22
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:56
@article{2125910,
  abstract     = {Rodents, together with bats, are among the ecologically most diverse and most speciose groups of mammals. Moreover, rodents show elaborate specializations of the feeding apparatus in response to the predominantly fore-aft movements of the lower jaw. The Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus was recently discovered and originally thought to belong to a new family. The difficulties in classifying L. aenigmamus based on morphological characters stem from the fact that it presents a mixture of sciurognathous and hystricognathous characteristics, including the morphology of the jaw adductors. The origin of the unusual muscular organization in this species remains, however, unclear. Here, we investigate the development of the masticatory system in Laonastes to better understand the origin of its derived morphology relative to other rodents. Our analyses show that skull and mandible development is characterized by an overall elongation of the snout region. Muscle mass increases with positive allometry during development and growth, and so does the force-generating capacity of the jaw adductor muscles (i.e. physiological cross-sectional area). Whereas fetal crania and musculature are more similar to those of typical rodents, adults diverge in the elongation of the rostral part of the skull and the disproportionate development of the zygomaticomandibularis. Our data suggest a functional signal in the development of the unusual cranial morphology, possibly associated with the folivorous trophic ecology of the species.},
  author       = {Herrel, Anthony and Fabre, Anne-Claire and Hugot, Jean-Pierre and Keovichit, Kam and Adriaens, Dominique and Brabant, Loes and Van Hoorebeke, Luc and Cornette, Raphael},
  issn         = {1469-7580},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ANATOMY},
  keyword      = {RODENTIA,HETEROCHRONY,MORPHOLOGY,BITE FORCE,ALBINO-RAT,MASTICATORY MUSCLE ARCHITECTURE,skull,scaling,ontogeny,mammal,jaw muscle,feeding,OSSIFICATION,EVOLUTION,PATTERNS,MUSCULATURE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {128--137},
  title        = {Ontogeny of the cranial system in Laonastes anigmamus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7580.2012.01519.x},
  volume       = {221},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Herrel, Anthony, Anne-Claire Fabre, Jean-Pierre Hugot, Kam Keovichit, Dominique Adriaens, Loes Brabant, Luc Van Hoorebeke, and Raphael Cornette. 2012. “Ontogeny of the Cranial System in Laonastes Anigmamus.” Journal of Anatomy 221 (2): 128–137.
APA
Herrel, A., Fabre, A.-C., Hugot, J.-P., Keovichit, K., Adriaens, D., Brabant, L., Van Hoorebeke, L., et al. (2012). Ontogeny of the cranial system in Laonastes anigmamus. JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, 221(2), 128–137.
Vancouver
1.
Herrel A, Fabre A-C, Hugot J-P, Keovichit K, Adriaens D, Brabant L, et al. Ontogeny of the cranial system in Laonastes anigmamus. JOURNAL OF ANATOMY. 2012;221(2):128–37.
MLA
Herrel, Anthony, Anne-Claire Fabre, Jean-Pierre Hugot, et al. “Ontogeny of the Cranial System in Laonastes Anigmamus.” JOURNAL OF ANATOMY 221.2 (2012): 128–137. Print.