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What knowledge and expectations are Ethiopian girls bringing with them into parenthood?

(2010) FOOD AND NUTRITION BULLETIN. 31(4). p.495-502
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Abstract
Background : Because of rapid population growth, many countries now have very large cohorts of young people Despite the population health importance of early child feeding practices, little work has explored the knowledge and expectations about infant feeding that youth bring with them as they transition into parenthood Objective : To examine adolescent girls' perceptions of infant and young child feeding practices in their communities, and to assess their knowledge and expectations regarding infant and young child feeding practices and explore their overlap with current feeding recommendations Methods : Cross-sectional data were obtained from a random sample of 1,018 girls 13 to 17 years of age living in rural, semiurban, and urban sites in southwestern Ethiopia Surveys were used to collect information on respondents' attitudes, expectations, and perceptions within the domain of infant and young child feeding practices Descriptive and bivariate statistics were used to describe the data Results : A total of 1 018 girls aged 13 to 17 years were interviewed The girls were able to report the age at which infants in their communities were provided liquids, semisolids, and solids as well as the perceived duration of breastfeeding in their communities The girls were generally able to report when they themselves planned to provide liquids and solids to their infants and their expected duration of breastfeedmg The girls attitudes and expectations were not consistent with exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months, and planned durations of breastfeeding were shorter than they currently perceived in their communities Conclusions : Young nulliparous Ethiopian women have well-formed attitudes and expectations about infant and young child feeding These are unlikely to promote currently accepted best practices Our results suggest both the potential that suboptimal feeding practices will be reproduced and novel intervention points
Keywords
Ethiopia, BREAST-FEEDING DURATION, child feeding, Adolescents, PEOPLES SEXUAL-BEHAVIOR, NEONATAL-MORTALITY, INFANT, CHILD, INITIATION, NUTRITION, PATTERNS, HEALTH, COHORT

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Hadley, Craig, Fasil Tessema, Tefera Belachew Lema, and David Lindstrom. 2010. “What Knowledge and Expectations Are Ethiopian Girls Bringing with Them into Parenthood?” Food and Nutrition Bulletin 31 (4): 495–502.
APA
Hadley, Craig, Tessema, F., Lema, T. B., & Lindstrom, D. (2010). What knowledge and expectations are Ethiopian girls bringing with them into parenthood? FOOD AND NUTRITION BULLETIN, 31(4), 495–502.
Vancouver
1.
Hadley C, Tessema F, Lema TB, Lindstrom D. What knowledge and expectations are Ethiopian girls bringing with them into parenthood? FOOD AND NUTRITION BULLETIN. 2010;31(4):495–502.
MLA
Hadley, Craig, Fasil Tessema, Tefera Belachew Lema, et al. “What Knowledge and Expectations Are Ethiopian Girls Bringing with Them into Parenthood?” FOOD AND NUTRITION BULLETIN 31.4 (2010): 495–502. Print.
@article{2122978,
  abstract     = {Background : Because of rapid population growth, many countries now have very large cohorts of young people Despite the population health importance of early child feeding practices, little work has explored the knowledge and expectations about infant feeding that youth bring with them as they transition into parenthood 
Objective : To examine adolescent girls' perceptions of infant and young child feeding practices in their communities, and to assess their knowledge and expectations regarding infant and young child feeding practices and explore their overlap with current feeding recommendations 
Methods : Cross-sectional data were obtained from a random sample of 1,018 girls 13 to 17 years of age living in rural, semiurban, and urban sites in southwestern Ethiopia Surveys were used to collect information on respondents' attitudes, expectations, and perceptions within the domain of infant and young child feeding practices Descriptive and bivariate statistics were used to describe the data 
Results : A total of 1 018 girls aged 13 to 17 years were interviewed The girls were able to report the age at which infants in their communities were provided liquids, semisolids, and solids as well as the perceived duration of breastfeeding in their communities The girls were generally able to report when they themselves planned to provide liquids and solids to their infants and their expected duration of breastfeedmg The girls attitudes and expectations were not consistent with exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months, and planned durations of breastfeeding were shorter than they currently perceived in their communities 
Conclusions : Young nulliparous Ethiopian women have well-formed attitudes and expectations about infant and young child feeding These are unlikely to promote currently accepted best practices Our results suggest both the potential that suboptimal feeding practices will be reproduced and novel intervention points},
  author       = {Hadley, Craig and Tessema, Fasil and Lema, Tefera Belachew and Lindstrom, David},
  issn         = {0379-5721},
  journal      = {FOOD AND NUTRITION BULLETIN},
  keyword      = {Ethiopia,BREAST-FEEDING DURATION,child feeding,Adolescents,PEOPLES SEXUAL-BEHAVIOR,NEONATAL-MORTALITY,INFANT,CHILD,INITIATION,NUTRITION,PATTERNS,HEALTH,COHORT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {495--502},
  title        = {What knowledge and expectations are Ethiopian girls bringing with them into parenthood?},
  url          = {http://docserver.ingentaconnect.com/deliver/connect/nsinf/03795721/v31n4/s3.pdf?expires=1338405312\&id=69082151\&titleid=41000042\&accname=Universiteitsbibliotheek+Gent\&checksum=E5C2BA338961D77F0CE7FD19CBC56E61},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2010},
}

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