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Creatinine determination according to Jaffe: what does it stand for?

Joris Delanghe UGent and MARIJN SPEECKAERT UGent (2011) CLINICAL KIDNEY JOURNAL. 4(2). p.83-86
abstract
In 1886, Max Jaffe discovered a reaction of creatinine with picric acid in an alkaline environment. Although the manuscript describes the nature of a precipitate and does not deal with an analytical assay, Jaffe's landmark paper elucidated the basic principles of the creatinine determination method (originally developed by Otto Folin), which became immensely popular and has easily withstood the test of time. Despite the advent of the enzymatic creatinine analysis, the analytical method is still popular due to its simplicity and low cost. As there is no standard recipe for the ‘Jaffe’ method, much methodological variation has occurred over time. This lack of methodological standardization implies that even in the 21st century, improving the interchangeability of Jaffe results is still an issue.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
standardization, Otto Folin, alkaline picrate reaction, creatinine
journal title
CLINICAL KIDNEY JOURNAL
Clin. Kidney J.
volume
4
issue
2
pages
83 - 86
ISSN
2048-8505
DOI
10.1093/ndtplus/sfq211
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2122189
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2122189
date created
2012-05-30 14:51:37
date last changed
2012-06-07 13:58:13
@article{2122189,
  abstract     = {In 1886, Max Jaffe discovered a reaction of creatinine with picric acid in an alkaline environment. Although the manuscript describes the nature of a precipitate and does not deal with an analytical assay, Jaffe's landmark paper elucidated the basic principles of the creatinine determination method (originally developed by Otto Folin), which became immensely popular and has easily withstood the test of time. Despite the advent of the enzymatic creatinine analysis, the analytical method is still popular due to its simplicity and low cost. As there is no standard recipe for the {\textquoteleft}Jaffe{\textquoteright} method, much methodological variation has occurred over time. This lack of methodological standardization implies that even in the 21st century, improving the interchangeability of Jaffe results is still an issue.},
  author       = {Delanghe, Joris and SPEECKAERT, MARIJN},
  issn         = {2048-8505},
  journal      = {CLINICAL KIDNEY JOURNAL},
  keyword      = {standardization,Otto Folin,alkaline picrate reaction,creatinine},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {83--86},
  title        = {Creatinine determination according to Jaffe: what does it stand for?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndtplus/sfq211},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Delanghe, Joris, and MARIJN SPEECKAERT. 2011. “Creatinine Determination According to Jaffe: What Does It Stand For?” Clinical Kidney Journal 4 (2): 83–86.
APA
Delanghe, Joris, & SPEECKAERT, M. (2011). Creatinine determination according to Jaffe: what does it stand for? CLINICAL KIDNEY JOURNAL, 4(2), 83–86.
Vancouver
1.
Delanghe J, SPEECKAERT M. Creatinine determination according to Jaffe: what does it stand for? CLINICAL KIDNEY JOURNAL. 2011;4(2):83–6.
MLA
Delanghe, Joris, and MARIJN SPEECKAERT. “Creatinine Determination According to Jaffe: What Does It Stand For?” CLINICAL KIDNEY JOURNAL 4.2 (2011): 83–86. Print.