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Compensating for the influence of total serum protein in the Schwartz formula

MARIJN SPEECKAERT UGent, BIRGIT WUYTS UGent, Veronique Stove UGent, Johan Vande Walle UGent and Joris Delanghe UGent (2012) CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE. 50(9). p.1597-1600
abstract
Background: The Schwartz 2009 creatinine-based revised formula is the only pediatric GFR estimating formula, which is compatible with the recent global creatinine standardization. This formula is only applicable if enzymatic creatinine methods are used. We propose an equation, taking into account the relative bias caused by serum proteins to use Jaffe based creatinine data for GFR estimation. Methods: In a cohort study of 100 pediatric patients, serum creatinine was measured using a kinetic rate-blanked Jaffe assay (modified kinetic alkaline picrate method), a kinetic rate-blanked Jaffe compensated assay for reactive proteins and an enzymatic assay (creatinine plus method). Serum total protein, albumin, urea, uric acid and total bilirubin were measured with the use of commercial agents. Results: The difference in serum creatinine between the enzymatic method and the compensated Jaffe method was mainly dependent on the total protein concentration in serum (r(2)=0.61, p < 0.001). After applying the proposed protein correction, corrected compensated Jaffe results and creatinine clearance values became interchangeable with enzymatic serum creatinine results (r(2)=0.99, p < 0.001; Deming regression: slope: 0.9787, intercept: -0.351) and with the newly proposed Schwartz formula, respectively (r(2)=0.99, p < 0.001; Deming regression: slope 1.004, intercept: 2.16). Conclusions: In this study, we demonstrated the usability of the alkaline picrate method in the Schwartz formula, taking into account the relative bias caused by serum proteins.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
glomerular filtration rate, children, Jaffe method, Schwartz formula, serum proteins, CREATININE DETERMINATION, REFERENCE INTERVALS, CHILDREN
journal title
CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE
Clin. Chem. Lab. Med.
volume
50
issue
9
pages
1597 - 1600
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000309954500017
JCR category
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.009 (2012)
JCR rank
5/30 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
1434-6621
DOI
10.1515/cclm-2012-0033
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2121889
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2121889
date created
2012-05-30 13:38:32
date last changed
2013-07-04 13:21:06
@article{2121889,
  abstract     = {Background: The Schwartz 2009 creatinine-based revised formula is the only pediatric GFR estimating formula, which is compatible with the recent global creatinine standardization. This formula is only applicable if enzymatic creatinine methods are used. We propose an equation, taking into account the relative bias caused by serum proteins to use Jaffe based creatinine data for GFR estimation. 
Methods: In a cohort study of 100 pediatric patients, serum creatinine was measured using a kinetic rate-blanked Jaffe assay (modified kinetic alkaline picrate method), a kinetic rate-blanked Jaffe compensated assay for reactive proteins and an enzymatic assay (creatinine plus method). Serum total protein, albumin, urea, uric acid and total bilirubin were measured with the use of commercial agents. 
Results: The difference in serum creatinine between the enzymatic method and the compensated Jaffe method was mainly dependent on the total protein concentration in serum (r(2)=0.61, p {\textlangle} 0.001). After applying the proposed protein correction, corrected compensated Jaffe results and creatinine clearance values became interchangeable with enzymatic serum creatinine results (r(2)=0.99, p {\textlangle} 0.001; Deming regression: slope: 0.9787, intercept: -0.351) and with the newly proposed Schwartz formula, respectively (r(2)=0.99, p {\textlangle} 0.001; Deming regression: slope 1.004, intercept: 2.16). 
Conclusions: In this study, we demonstrated the usability of the alkaline picrate method in the Schwartz formula, taking into account the relative bias caused by serum proteins.},
  author       = {SPEECKAERT, MARIJN and WUYTS, BIRGIT and Stove, Veronique and Vande Walle, Johan and Delanghe, Joris},
  issn         = {1434-6621},
  journal      = {CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {glomerular filtration rate,children,Jaffe method,Schwartz formula,serum proteins,CREATININE DETERMINATION,REFERENCE INTERVALS,CHILDREN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1597--1600},
  title        = {Compensating for the influence of total serum protein in the Schwartz formula},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2012-0033},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
SPEECKAERT, MARIJN, BIRGIT WUYTS, VERONIQUE STOVE, Johan Vande Walle, and Joris Delanghe. 2012. “Compensating for the Influence of Total Serum Protein in the Schwartz Formula.” Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine 50 (9): 1597–1600.
APA
SPEECKAERT, M., WUYTS, B., STOVE, V., Vande Walle, J., & Delanghe, J. (2012). Compensating for the influence of total serum protein in the Schwartz formula. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE, 50(9), 1597–1600.
Vancouver
1.
SPEECKAERT M, WUYTS B, STOVE V, Vande Walle J, Delanghe J. Compensating for the influence of total serum protein in the Schwartz formula. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE. 2012;50(9):1597–600.
MLA
SPEECKAERT, MARIJN, BIRGIT WUYTS, VERONIQUE STOVE, et al. “Compensating for the Influence of Total Serum Protein in the Schwartz Formula.” CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE 50.9 (2012): 1597–1600. Print.