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Heritability and artificial selection on ambulatory dispersal distance in Tetranychus urticae: effects of density and maternal effects

Ellyn Valery Bitume, Dries Bonte UGent, Sara Magalhães, Gilles San Martin, Stefan Van Dongen, Fabian Bach, Justin Michael Anderson, Isabelle Olivieri and Caroline Marie Nieberding (2011) PLOS ONE. 6(10).
abstract
Dispersal distance is understudied although the evolution of dispersal distance affects the distribution of genetic diversity through space. Using the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, we tested the conditions under which dispersal distance could evolve. To this aim, we performed artificial selection based on dispersal distance by choosing 40 individuals (out of 150) that settled furthest from the home patch (high dispersal, HDIS) and 40 individuals that remained close to the home patch (low dispersal, LDIS) with three replicates per treatment. We did not observe a response to selection nor a difference between treatments in life-history traits (fecundity, survival, longevity, and sex-ratio) after ten generations of selection. However, we show that heritability for dispersal distance depends on density. Heritability for dispersal distance was low and non-significant when using the same density as the artificial selection experiments while heritability becomes significant at a lower density. Furthermore, we show that maternal effects may have influenced the dispersal behaviour of the mites. Our results suggest primarily that selection did not work because high density and maternal effects induced phenotypic plasticity for dispersal distance. Density and maternal effects may affect the evolution of dispersal distance and should be incorporated into future theoretical and empirical studies.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SPATIALLY-STRUCTURED POPULATIONS, 2-SPOTTED SPIDER-MITE, QUANTITATIVE GENETIC-ANALYSIS, LIFE-HISTORY TRAITS, EPIPHYAS-POSTVITTANA, DEPENDENT DISPERSAL, KIN COMPETITION, RANGE EXPANSION, FLIGHT CAPACITY, EVOLUTION
journal title
PLOS ONE
PLoS One
volume
6
issue
10
article_number
e26927
pages
9 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000296916000033
JCR category
BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.092 (2011)
JCR rank
12/84 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0026927
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
2121407
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2121407
date created
2012-05-30 11:48:28
date last changed
2012-06-06 16:56:46
@article{2121407,
  abstract     = {Dispersal distance is understudied although the evolution of dispersal distance affects the distribution of genetic diversity through space. Using the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, we tested the conditions under which dispersal distance could evolve. To this aim, we performed artificial selection based on dispersal distance by choosing 40 individuals (out of 150) that settled furthest from the home patch (high dispersal, HDIS) and 40 individuals that remained close to the home patch (low dispersal, LDIS) with three replicates per treatment. We did not observe a response to selection nor a difference between treatments in life-history traits (fecundity, survival, longevity, and sex-ratio) after ten generations of selection. However, we show that heritability for dispersal distance depends on density. Heritability for dispersal distance was low and non-significant when using the same density as the artificial selection experiments while heritability becomes significant at a lower density. Furthermore, we show that maternal effects may have influenced the dispersal behaviour of the mites. Our results suggest primarily that selection did not work because high density and maternal effects induced phenotypic plasticity for dispersal distance. Density and maternal effects may affect the evolution of dispersal distance and should be incorporated into future theoretical and empirical studies.},
  articleno    = {e26927},
  author       = {Bitume, Ellyn Valery and Bonte, Dries and Magalh{\~a}es, Sara and San Martin, Gilles and Van Dongen, Stefan  and Bach, Fabian and Anderson, Justin Michael and Olivieri, Isabelle and Nieberding, Caroline Marie},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keyword      = {SPATIALLY-STRUCTURED POPULATIONS,2-SPOTTED SPIDER-MITE,QUANTITATIVE GENETIC-ANALYSIS,LIFE-HISTORY TRAITS,EPIPHYAS-POSTVITTANA,DEPENDENT DISPERSAL,KIN COMPETITION,RANGE EXPANSION,FLIGHT CAPACITY,EVOLUTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {9},
  title        = {Heritability and artificial selection on ambulatory dispersal distance in Tetranychus urticae: effects of density and maternal effects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0026927},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Bitume, Ellyn Valery, Dries Bonte, Sara Magalhães, Gilles San Martin, Stefan Van Dongen, Fabian Bach, Justin Michael Anderson, Isabelle Olivieri, and Caroline Marie Nieberding. 2011. “Heritability and Artificial Selection on Ambulatory Dispersal Distance in Tetranychus Urticae: Effects of Density and Maternal Effects.” Plos One 6 (10).
APA
Bitume, E. V., Bonte, D., Magalhães, S., San Martin, G., Van Dongen, S., Bach, F., Anderson, J. M., et al. (2011). Heritability and artificial selection on ambulatory dispersal distance in Tetranychus urticae: effects of density and maternal effects. PLOS ONE, 6(10).
Vancouver
1.
Bitume EV, Bonte D, Magalhães S, San Martin G, Van Dongen S, Bach F, et al. Heritability and artificial selection on ambulatory dispersal distance in Tetranychus urticae: effects of density and maternal effects. PLOS ONE. 2011;6(10).
MLA
Bitume, Ellyn Valery, Dries Bonte, Sara Magalhães, et al. “Heritability and Artificial Selection on Ambulatory Dispersal Distance in Tetranychus Urticae: Effects of Density and Maternal Effects.” PLOS ONE 6.10 (2011): n. pag. Print.