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Change and reciprocity in adolescent aggressive and rule-breaking behaviors and parental support and dysfunctional discipline

Amaranta De Haan UGent, Peter Prinzie and Maja Dekovic (2012) DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY. 24(1). p.301-315
abstract
This study examined how the development of aggressive/rule-breaking behaviors (9-17 years) is related to the development of overreactive and warm parenting, and explored gender differences in development and interrelations. Externalizing was assessed using combined mother/father reports of the Child Behavior Checklist (N = 516). Overreactivity was assessed using self-reports of the Parenting Scale; warmth was measured using self reports of the Parenting Practices Questionnaire. All constructs were assessed three times across 6 years. The interrelated development of externalizing and parenting was examined by cohort-sequential multigroup latent growth models. Timing of effects was investigated using multigroup cross-lagged models. The results from latent growth models suggest that boys and girls change similarly in the extent to which they show externalizing behaviors, and indicate that mothers and fathers show somewhat different parenting toward boys than girls. No gender differences were found for interrelations between externalizing and parenting. Initial levels of aggression were related to changes in overreactivity and warmth, and vice versa. Changes in externalizing were related to changes in parenting. Cross-lagged models showed that relations between overreactivity and aggression/rule breaking were reciprocal. Together, results from this study show that adolescent externalizing and parenting affect each other in important ways, regardless of the gender of the child or the parent.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CHILD-PERSONALITY, EXTERNALIZING PROBLEMS, DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR, GENDER-DIFFERENCES, HARSH DISCIPLINE, MODEL, PREDICTORS, ADJUSTMENT, GROWTH, METAANALYSIS
journal title
DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
Dev. Psychopathol.
volume
24
issue
1
pages
301 - 315
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000300270600025
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, DEVELOPMENTAL
JCR impact factor
4.926 (2012)
JCR rank
3/65 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0954-5794
DOI
10.1017/S0954579411000848
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2118683
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2118683
date created
2012-05-30 08:23:40
date last changed
2012-05-30 11:40:59
@article{2118683,
  abstract     = {This study examined how the development of aggressive/rule-breaking behaviors (9-17 years) is related to the development of overreactive and warm parenting, and explored gender differences in development and interrelations. Externalizing was assessed using combined mother/father reports of the Child Behavior Checklist (N = 516). Overreactivity was assessed using self-reports of the Parenting Scale; warmth was measured using self reports of the Parenting Practices Questionnaire. All constructs were assessed three times across 6 years. The interrelated development of externalizing and parenting was examined by cohort-sequential multigroup latent growth models. Timing of effects was investigated using multigroup cross-lagged models. The results from latent growth models suggest that boys and girls change similarly in the extent to which they show externalizing behaviors, and indicate that mothers and fathers show somewhat different parenting toward boys than girls. No gender differences were found for interrelations between externalizing and parenting. Initial levels of aggression were related to changes in overreactivity and warmth, and vice versa. Changes in externalizing were related to changes in parenting. Cross-lagged models showed that relations between overreactivity and aggression/rule breaking were reciprocal. Together, results from this study show that adolescent externalizing and parenting affect each other in important ways, regardless of the gender of the child or the parent.},
  author       = {De Haan, Amaranta and Prinzie, Peter  and Dekovic, Maja},
  issn         = {0954-5794},
  journal      = {DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {CHILD-PERSONALITY,EXTERNALIZING PROBLEMS,DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR,GENDER-DIFFERENCES,HARSH DISCIPLINE,MODEL,PREDICTORS,ADJUSTMENT,GROWTH,METAANALYSIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {301--315},
  title        = {Change and reciprocity in adolescent aggressive and rule-breaking behaviors and parental support and dysfunctional discipline},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579411000848},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
De Haan, Amaranta, Peter Prinzie, and Maja Dekovic. 2012. “Change and Reciprocity in Adolescent Aggressive and Rule-breaking Behaviors and Parental Support and Dysfunctional Discipline.” Development and Psychopathology 24 (1): 301–315.
APA
De Haan, A., Prinzie, P., & Dekovic, M. (2012). Change and reciprocity in adolescent aggressive and rule-breaking behaviors and parental support and dysfunctional discipline. DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY, 24(1), 301–315.
Vancouver
1.
De Haan A, Prinzie P, Dekovic M. Change and reciprocity in adolescent aggressive and rule-breaking behaviors and parental support and dysfunctional discipline. DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY. 2012;24(1):301–15.
MLA
De Haan, Amaranta, Peter Prinzie, and Maja Dekovic. “Change and Reciprocity in Adolescent Aggressive and Rule-breaking Behaviors and Parental Support and Dysfunctional Discipline.” DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 24.1 (2012): 301–315. Print.