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Transmission of pseudorabies virus from immune-masked blood monocytes to endothelial cells

Gerlinde Van de Walle UGent, Herman Favoreel UGent, Hans Nauwynck UGent, Thomas C Mettenleiter and Maurice Pensaert (2003) JOURNAL OF GENERAL VIROLOGY. 84(3). p.629-637
abstract
Pseudorabies virus (PRV) may cause abortion, even in the presence of vaccination-induced immunity. Blood monocytes are essential to transport the virus in these immune animals, including transport to the pregnant uterus. Infected monocytes express viral proteins on their cell surface. Specific antibodies recognize these proteins and should activate antibody-dependent cell lysis. Previous work showed that addition of PRV-specific polyclonal antibodies to PRV-infected monocytes induced internalization of viral cell surface proteins, protecting the cells from efficient antibody-dependent lysis in vitro (immune-masked monocytes). As a first step to reach the pregnant uterus, PRV has to cross the endothelial cell barrier of the maternal blood vessels. The current aim was to investigate in vitro whether immune-masked PRV-infected monocytes can transmit PRV in the presence of virus-neutralizing antibodies via adhesion and fusion of these monocytes with endothelial cells. Porcine blood monocytes, infected with a lacZ-carrying PRV strain were incubated with PRV-specific antibodies to induce internalization. Then, cells were co-cultivated with endothelial cells for different periods of time. Only PRV-infected monocytes with internalized viral cell surface proteins adhered efficiently to endothelial cells. LacZ transmission to endothelial cells, as a measure for monocyte-endothelial cell fusion, could be detected after co-cultivation from 30 min onwards. Virus transmission was confirmed by the appearance of plaques. Adhesion of immune-masked PRV-infected monocytes to endothelial cells was mediated by cellular adhesion complex CD11b-CD18 and subsequent fusion was mediated by the virus. In conclusion, immune-masked PRV-infected monocytes can adhere and subsequently transmit virus to endothelial cells in the presence of PRV-neutralizing antibodies.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SPREAD, IN-VITRO, VACCINATED SOWS, INFECTED MONOCYTES, ADHESION MOLECULES, MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES, VIRAL GLYCOPROTEINS, HUMAN CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, ANTIBODY-INDUCED INTERNALIZATION, AUJESZKYS-DISEASE VIRUS
journal title
JOURNAL OF GENERAL VIROLOGY
J. Gen. Virol.
volume
84
issue
3
pages
629 - 637
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000181237500016
JCR category
BIOTECHNOLOGY & APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.036 (2003)
JCR rank
24/132 (2003)
JCR quartile
1 (2003)
ISSN
0022-1317
DOI
10.1099/vir.0.18796-0
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
211720
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-211720
date created
2004-04-19 17:32:00
date last changed
2017-04-20 14:18:23
@article{211720,
  abstract     = {Pseudorabies virus (PRV) may cause abortion, even in the presence of vaccination-induced immunity. Blood monocytes are essential to transport the virus in these immune animals, including transport to the pregnant uterus. Infected monocytes express viral proteins on their cell surface. Specific antibodies recognize these proteins and should activate antibody-dependent cell lysis. Previous work showed that addition of PRV-specific polyclonal antibodies to PRV-infected monocytes induced internalization of viral cell surface proteins, protecting the cells from efficient antibody-dependent lysis in vitro (immune-masked monocytes). As a first step to reach the pregnant uterus, PRV has to cross the endothelial cell barrier of the maternal blood vessels. The current aim was to investigate in vitro whether immune-masked PRV-infected monocytes can transmit PRV in the presence of virus-neutralizing antibodies via adhesion and fusion of these monocytes with endothelial cells. Porcine blood monocytes, infected with a lacZ-carrying PRV strain were incubated with PRV-specific antibodies to induce internalization. Then, cells were co-cultivated with endothelial cells for different periods of time. Only PRV-infected monocytes with internalized viral cell surface proteins adhered efficiently to endothelial cells. LacZ transmission to endothelial cells, as a measure for monocyte-endothelial cell fusion, could be detected after co-cultivation from 30 min onwards. Virus transmission was confirmed by the appearance of plaques. Adhesion of immune-masked PRV-infected monocytes to endothelial cells was mediated by cellular adhesion complex CD11b-CD18 and subsequent fusion was mediated by the virus. In conclusion, immune-masked PRV-infected monocytes can adhere and subsequently transmit virus to endothelial cells in the presence of PRV-neutralizing antibodies.},
  author       = {Van de Walle, Gerlinde and Favoreel, Herman and Nauwynck, Hans and Mettenleiter, Thomas C and Pensaert, Maurice},
  issn         = {0022-1317},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF GENERAL VIROLOGY},
  keyword      = {SPREAD,IN-VITRO,VACCINATED SOWS,INFECTED MONOCYTES,ADHESION MOLECULES,MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES,VIRAL GLYCOPROTEINS,HUMAN CYTOMEGALOVIRUS,ANTIBODY-INDUCED INTERNALIZATION,AUJESZKYS-DISEASE VIRUS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {629--637},
  title        = {Transmission of pseudorabies virus from immune-masked blood monocytes to endothelial cells},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/vir.0.18796-0},
  volume       = {84},
  year         = {2003},
}

Chicago
Van de Walle, Gerlinde, Herman Favoreel, Hans Nauwynck, Thomas C Mettenleiter, and Maurice Pensaert. 2003. “Transmission of Pseudorabies Virus from Immune-masked Blood Monocytes to Endothelial Cells.” Journal of General Virology 84 (3): 629–637.
APA
Van de Walle, Gerlinde, Favoreel, H., Nauwynck, H., Mettenleiter, T. C., & Pensaert, M. (2003). Transmission of pseudorabies virus from immune-masked blood monocytes to endothelial cells. JOURNAL OF GENERAL VIROLOGY, 84(3), 629–637.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Walle G, Favoreel H, Nauwynck H, Mettenleiter TC, Pensaert M. Transmission of pseudorabies virus from immune-masked blood monocytes to endothelial cells. JOURNAL OF GENERAL VIROLOGY. 2003;84(3):629–37.
MLA
Van de Walle, Gerlinde, Herman Favoreel, Hans Nauwynck, et al. “Transmission of Pseudorabies Virus from Immune-masked Blood Monocytes to Endothelial Cells.” JOURNAL OF GENERAL VIROLOGY 84.3 (2003): 629–637. Print.