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Speaking in numbers as a transitional phase between mutism and Wernicke's aphasia : a report of three cases

Miet De Letter UGent, John Van Borsel UGent, Katja Batens, Marjan Megens UGent, Dimitri Hemelsoet, Nele Verreyt, Wouter Duyck UGent, Wim Fias UGent and Patrick Santens UGent (2012) APHASIOLOGY. 26(7). p.917-932
abstract
Background: Mutism in the context of hemispheric stroke with aphasia is rare and usually evolves to non-fluent aphasia. Aims: We describe three multilingual and mathematically educated patients with an initial presentation of mutism, followed by a short-lasting episode of speaking in numbers as a transitional stage before developing Wernicke's aphasia. We discuss potential pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Methods & Procedures: Clinical neurolinguistic testing, including Aachen Aphasia Test and video-analysis of spontaneous speech by transcription. Outcomes & Results: In the transitional stage between mutism and Wernicke's aphasia, numbers were randomly uttered in one or more languages, although not necessarily in the first acquired or most-used language. Number speech occurred not only in propositional speech, but also during reading and naming. Conclusions: These patients exhibit two peculiar phenomena. First, the evolution of mutism to Wernicke's aphasia and second, the transitional phase of number speech. It is hypothesised that mutism may be more frequent in the hyperacute stages of stroke-related aphasia as a consequence of transient generalised failure of the language network. Current theories on the organisation of number magnitude and lexical retrieval of number and non-number words are discussed with reference to numerical speech. The lack of previous reports of this syndrome is probably due to the combination of the transient nature of the phenomenon and the suspected prerequisites of a specific neuro-anatomical lesion and educational background.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Aphasia, Multilingual, Wernicke, SPEECH AUTOMATISMS, RECURRING UTTERANCES, SEMANTIC SYSTEM, COMPREHENSION, BRAIN, Stroke, FMRI, WORD, Mutism, Numbers
journal title
APHASIOLOGY
Aphasiology
volume
26
issue
7
pages
917 - 932
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000305512600004
JCR category
CLINICAL NEUROLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.701 (2012)
JCR rank
116/190 (2012)
JCR quartile
3 (2012)
ISSN
0268-7038
DOI
10.1080/02687038.2012.660460
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2115579
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2115579
date created
2012-05-25 15:37:51
date last changed
2018-06-20 12:34:56
@article{2115579,
  abstract     = {Background: Mutism in the context of hemispheric stroke with aphasia is rare and usually evolves to non-fluent aphasia. Aims: We describe three multilingual and mathematically educated patients with an initial presentation of mutism, followed by a short-lasting episode of speaking in numbers as a transitional stage before developing Wernicke's aphasia. We discuss potential pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Methods \& Procedures: Clinical neurolinguistic testing, including Aachen Aphasia Test and video-analysis of spontaneous speech by transcription. Outcomes \& Results: In the transitional stage between mutism and Wernicke's aphasia, numbers were randomly uttered in one or more languages, although not necessarily in the first acquired or most-used language. Number speech occurred not only in propositional speech, but also during reading and naming. Conclusions: These patients exhibit two peculiar phenomena. First, the evolution of mutism to Wernicke's aphasia and second, the transitional phase of number speech. It is hypothesised that mutism may be more frequent in the hyperacute stages of stroke-related aphasia as a consequence of transient generalised failure of the language network. Current theories on the organisation of number magnitude and lexical retrieval of number and non-number words are discussed with reference to numerical speech. The lack of previous reports of this syndrome is probably due to the combination of the transient nature of the phenomenon and the suspected prerequisites of a specific neuro-anatomical lesion and educational background.},
  author       = {De Letter, Miet and Van Borsel, John and Batens, Katja and Megens, Marjan and Hemelsoet, Dimitri and Verreyt, Nele and Duyck, Wouter and Fias, Wim and Santens, Patrick},
  issn         = {0268-7038},
  journal      = {APHASIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Aphasia,Multilingual,Wernicke,SPEECH AUTOMATISMS,RECURRING UTTERANCES,SEMANTIC SYSTEM,COMPREHENSION,BRAIN,Stroke,FMRI,WORD,Mutism,Numbers},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {917--932},
  title        = {Speaking in numbers as a transitional phase between mutism and Wernicke's aphasia : a report of three cases},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2012.660460},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
De Letter, Miet, John Van Borsel, Katja Batens, Marjan Megens, Dimitri Hemelsoet, Nele Verreyt, Wouter Duyck, Wim Fias, and Patrick Santens. 2012. “Speaking in Numbers as a Transitional Phase Between Mutism and Wernicke’s Aphasia : a Report of Three Cases.” Aphasiology 26 (7): 917–932.
APA
De Letter, M., Van Borsel, J., Batens, K., Megens, M., Hemelsoet, D., Verreyt, N., Duyck, W., et al. (2012). Speaking in numbers as a transitional phase between mutism and Wernicke’s aphasia : a report of three cases. APHASIOLOGY, 26(7), 917–932.
Vancouver
1.
De Letter M, Van Borsel J, Batens K, Megens M, Hemelsoet D, Verreyt N, et al. Speaking in numbers as a transitional phase between mutism and Wernicke’s aphasia : a report of three cases. APHASIOLOGY. 2012;26(7):917–32.
MLA
De Letter, Miet, John Van Borsel, Katja Batens, et al. “Speaking in Numbers as a Transitional Phase Between Mutism and Wernicke’s Aphasia : a Report of Three Cases.” APHASIOLOGY 26.7 (2012): 917–932. Print.