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Sector field ICP-mass spectrometry for the routine determination of uranium in urine

Frank Vanhaecke UGent, Geert Stevens, Günther De Wannemacker and Luc Moens UGent (2003) CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ANALYTICAL SCIENCES AND SPECTROSCOPY. 48(5). p.251-257
abstract
A method was developed for the quantification of U in urine by means of sector field ICP-mass spectrometry. To make the method suitable for epidemiological studies, reliability had to be combined with a high sample throughput. As a result, the sample pre-treatment was limited to 10-fold dilution with 0.14 M HNO3, while external standardisation was preferred over standard additions or isotope dilution for calibration. Use of a properly selected internal standard (Re) and optimisation of the carrier gas flow rate, aiming at a minimisation of the effect of the matrix on the signal ratio of the U-238(+), signal intensity to that of the internal standard Re-187(+), permitted accurate results to be obtained. The reliability of the method developed was demonstrated by the successful analysis of a certified reference material (BCR-668 Mussel Tissue) and a consequent near to 100% recovery for a 50 ng/L spike added to urine. The result for non-spiked pooled urine (U content of 1.6 ng/L) only varied within narrow and acceptable boundaries (+/- 10%). The limit of detection was established to be 0.2 ng/L, while the sensitivity amounted to 2000 counts/s per ng/L. At a level of 10 ng/L, the precision is typically 5% relative standard deviation. Per sample, the acquisition time is less than three minutes, permitting the analysis of approximately 100 samples in an 8h-working day. A pilot study showed that selection of the vessel material is not without importance, as some materials were shown to give rise to an unacceptably high blank level. Urinary U concentrations of approximately 3-4 ng/L, corresponding to 2-3 ng / g creatinine, seem to be typical for non-exposed individuals in Belgium and the Netherlands, although some values (<5%) exceeded 10 ng/L.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
urine, uranium, sector field ICP-mass spectrometry, ultra-trace element, analysis, ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION, DEPLETED URANIUM, MS, EXCRETION
journal title
CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ANALYTICAL SCIENCES AND SPECTROSCOPY
Can. J. Anal. Sci. Spectrosc.
volume
48
issue
5
pages
251 - 257
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000186885700001
JCR category
CHEMISTRY, ANALYTICAL
JCR impact factor
0.766 (2003)
JCR rank
52/67 (2003)
JCR quartile
4 (2003)
ISSN
1205-6685
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
211463
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-211463
date created
2004-04-19 10:18:00
date last changed
2012-11-12 16:52:00
@article{211463,
  abstract     = {A method was developed for the quantification of U in urine by means of sector field ICP-mass spectrometry. To make the method suitable for epidemiological studies, reliability had to be combined with a high sample throughput. As a result, the sample pre-treatment was limited to 10-fold dilution with 0.14 M HNO3, while external standardisation was preferred over standard additions or isotope dilution for calibration. Use of a properly selected internal standard (Re) and optimisation of the carrier gas flow rate, aiming at a minimisation of the effect of the matrix on the signal ratio of the U-238(+), signal intensity to that of the internal standard Re-187(+), permitted accurate results to be obtained. The reliability of the method developed was demonstrated by the successful analysis of a certified reference material (BCR-668 Mussel Tissue) and a consequent near to 100\% recovery for a 50 ng/L spike added to urine. The result for non-spiked pooled urine (U content of 1.6 ng/L) only varied within narrow and acceptable boundaries (+/- 10\%). The limit of detection was established to be 0.2 ng/L, while the sensitivity amounted to 2000 counts/s per ng/L. At a level of 10 ng/L, the precision is typically 5\% relative standard deviation. Per sample, the acquisition time is less than three minutes, permitting the analysis of approximately 100 samples in an 8h-working day. A pilot study showed that selection of the vessel material is not without importance, as some materials were shown to give rise to an unacceptably high blank level. Urinary U concentrations of approximately 3-4 ng/L, corresponding to 2-3 ng / g creatinine, seem to be typical for non-exposed individuals in Belgium and the Netherlands, although some values ({\textlangle}5\%) exceeded 10 ng/L.},
  author       = {Vanhaecke, Frank and Stevens, Geert and De Wannemacker, G{\"u}nther and Moens, Luc},
  issn         = {1205-6685},
  journal      = {CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ANALYTICAL SCIENCES AND SPECTROSCOPY},
  keyword      = {urine,uranium,sector field ICP-mass spectrometry,ultra-trace element,analysis,ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION,DEPLETED URANIUM,MS,EXCRETION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {251--257},
  title        = {Sector field ICP-mass spectrometry for the routine determination of uranium in urine},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2003},
}

Chicago
Vanhaecke, Frank, Geert Stevens, Günther De Wannemacker, and Luc Moens. 2003. “Sector Field ICP-mass Spectrometry for the Routine Determination of Uranium in Urine.” Canadian Journal of Analytical Sciences and Spectroscopy 48 (5): 251–257.
APA
Vanhaecke, Frank, Stevens, G., De Wannemacker, G., & Moens, L. (2003). Sector field ICP-mass spectrometry for the routine determination of uranium in urine. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ANALYTICAL SCIENCES AND SPECTROSCOPY, 48(5), 251–257.
Vancouver
1.
Vanhaecke F, Stevens G, De Wannemacker G, Moens L. Sector field ICP-mass spectrometry for the routine determination of uranium in urine. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ANALYTICAL SCIENCES AND SPECTROSCOPY. 2003;48(5):251–7.
MLA
Vanhaecke, Frank, Geert Stevens, Günther De Wannemacker, et al. “Sector Field ICP-mass Spectrometry for the Routine Determination of Uranium in Urine.” CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ANALYTICAL SCIENCES AND SPECTROSCOPY 48.5 (2003): 251–257. Print.