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Long-term effects of mineral versus organic fertilizers on activity and structure of the methanotrophic community in agricultural soils

Dave Seghers, Eva M Top, Dirk Reheul UGent, Robert Bulcke, Pascal Boeckx UGent, Willy Verstraete UGent and Steven Siciliano (2003) ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 5(10). p.867-877
abstract
Agricultural practices, such as mineral nitrogen fertilization, have an impact on the soil's ability to oxidize methane, but little is known about the shifts in the methanotrophic community composition associated with these practices. Therefore, the long-term effect of both mineral (NH4NO3) and organic (manure and GFT-compost) fertilizer applications on the soil methanotrophic community activity and structure were investigated. Both high and low affinity methane oxidation rates were lower in the soil treated with mineral fertilizer compared to the other soils. An enhanced nitrate concentration was observed in the mineral fertilized soil but nitrate did not show a direct affect on the high affinity methane oxidation. In contrast, the low affinity methane oxidation was slowed down by increased nitrate concentrations, which suggests a direct effect of nitrate on low affinity methane oxidation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments specific for methanotrophs revealed a distinct community between the mineral and organic fertilized soils as extra Type I methanotrophic bands (phylotypes) became visible in the organic fertilized soils. These phylotypes were not visible in the patterns of the added organic fertilizers suggesting an indirect effect of the organic fertilizers on the methanotrophic community. Additionally, a molecular analysis was performed after the low affinity methane oxidation test. The enhanced methane concentrations used in the test enriched certain low affinity methanotrophs in the organic fertilized soils but not in the mineral fertilized soil. Supporting the molecular and functional observations, fatty acids characteristic for methanotrophs were less abundant in the soil treated with mineral fertilizer compared to the soil treated with compost. In conclusion, the function and molecular and chemical composition of the methanotrophic community are all altered in soil fertilized with mineral fertilizer.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
METHANE-OXIDIZING BACTERIA, GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS, 16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA, MICROBIAL COMMUNITY, FOREST SOILS, NITROGEN-FERTILIZATION, ATMOSPHERIC METHANE, II METHANOTROPHS, ARABLE SOIL, LAND-USE
journal title
ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
Environ. Microbiol.
volume
5
issue
10
pages
867-877 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000185743500006
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.699 (2003)
JCR rank
15/84 (2003)
JCR quartile
1 (2003)
ISSN
1462-2912
DOI
10.1046/j.1462-2920.2003.00477.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
211208
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-211208
date created
2004-04-16 09:58:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:16
@article{211208,
  abstract     = {Agricultural practices, such as mineral nitrogen fertilization, have an impact on the soil's ability to oxidize methane, but little is known about the shifts in the methanotrophic community composition associated with these practices. Therefore, the long-term effect of both mineral (NH4NO3) and organic (manure and GFT-compost) fertilizer applications on the soil methanotrophic community activity and structure were investigated. Both high and low affinity methane oxidation rates were lower in the soil treated with mineral fertilizer compared to the other soils. An enhanced nitrate concentration was observed in the mineral fertilized soil but nitrate did not show a direct affect on the high affinity methane oxidation. In contrast, the low affinity methane oxidation was slowed down by increased nitrate concentrations, which suggests a direct effect of nitrate on low affinity methane oxidation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments specific for methanotrophs revealed a distinct community between the mineral and organic fertilized soils as extra Type I methanotrophic bands (phylotypes) became visible in the organic fertilized soils. These phylotypes were not visible in the patterns of the added organic fertilizers suggesting an indirect effect of the organic fertilizers on the methanotrophic community. Additionally, a molecular analysis was performed after the low affinity methane oxidation test. The enhanced methane concentrations used in the test enriched certain low affinity methanotrophs in the organic fertilized soils but not in the mineral fertilized soil. Supporting the molecular and functional observations, fatty acids characteristic for methanotrophs were less abundant in the soil treated with mineral fertilizer compared to the soil treated with compost. In conclusion, the function and molecular and chemical composition of the methanotrophic community are all altered in soil fertilized with mineral fertilizer.},
  author       = {Seghers, Dave and Top, Eva M and Reheul, Dirk and Bulcke, Robert and Boeckx, Pascal and Verstraete, Willy and Siciliano, Steven},
  issn         = {1462-2912},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {METHANE-OXIDIZING BACTERIA,GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS,16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA,MICROBIAL COMMUNITY,FOREST SOILS,NITROGEN-FERTILIZATION,ATMOSPHERIC METHANE,II METHANOTROPHS,ARABLE SOIL,LAND-USE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {867--877},
  title        = {Long-term effects of mineral versus organic fertilizers on activity and structure of the methanotrophic community in agricultural soils},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1462-2920.2003.00477.x},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2003},
}

Chicago
Seghers, Dave, Eva M Top, Dirk Reheul, Robert Bulcke, Pascal Boeckx, Willy Verstraete, and Steven Siciliano. 2003. “Long-term Effects of Mineral Versus Organic Fertilizers on Activity and Structure of the Methanotrophic Community in Agricultural Soils.” Environmental Microbiology 5 (10): 867–877.
APA
Seghers, Dave, Top, E. M., Reheul, D., Bulcke, R., Boeckx, P., Verstraete, W., & Siciliano, S. (2003). Long-term effects of mineral versus organic fertilizers on activity and structure of the methanotrophic community in agricultural soils. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 5(10), 867–877.
Vancouver
1.
Seghers D, Top EM, Reheul D, Bulcke R, Boeckx P, Verstraete W, et al. Long-term effects of mineral versus organic fertilizers on activity and structure of the methanotrophic community in agricultural soils. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2003;5(10):867–77.
MLA
Seghers, Dave, Eva M Top, Dirk Reheul, et al. “Long-term Effects of Mineral Versus Organic Fertilizers on Activity and Structure of the Methanotrophic Community in Agricultural Soils.” ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 5.10 (2003): 867–877. Print.