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Health care decisions by Sukuma 'peasant intellectuals': a case of radical empiricism?

Koenraad Stroeken UGent (2012) ANTHROPOLOGY & MEDICINE. 19(1). p.119-128
abstract
Health care decisions in Sukuma-speaking rural communities in Tanzania reproduce a practical epistemology that could be described as radically empiricist, rather than just pluralist; their point of reference is the deeper ‘relation’ between events, which collective traditions articulate and subjects may experience, but which escapes the atomistic perception privileged by biomedicine. This analysis relies on a diverse portfolio of ethnographic data, including the use and structure of medicinal recipes, the choices of mental health care according to experienced ‘effectiveness’, and lay discussions on the correct aetiology and treatment of reproductive disorder. Combining two dimensions for a given medical epistemology, the (empirical/ habitual) basis of its transmission and the (open/closed) relation with other epistemologies, four types are proposed: monism, dualism, pluralism, and radical empiricism. The concept of peasant intellectuals, it is argued, needs to be rethought in contexts of medicinal initiation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
traditional medicine, epistemology, mental health, Sukuma, ethnopharmacology
journal title
ANTHROPOLOGY & MEDICINE
Anthropol. med.
volume
19
issue
1
pages
119 - 128
ISSN
1364-8470
DOI
10.1080/13648470.2012.660464
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
VABB id
c:vabb:335928
VABB type
VABB-1
id
2110012
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2110012
date created
2012-05-22 09:32:19
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:02:54
@article{2110012,
  abstract     = {Health care decisions in Sukuma-speaking rural communities in Tanzania reproduce a practical epistemology that could be described as radically empiricist, rather than just pluralist; their point of reference is the deeper {\textquoteleft}relation{\textquoteright} between events, which collective traditions articulate and subjects may experience, but which escapes the atomistic perception privileged by biomedicine. This analysis relies on a diverse portfolio of ethnographic data, including the use and structure of medicinal recipes, the choices of mental health care according to experienced {\textquoteleft}effectiveness{\textquoteright}, and lay discussions on the correct aetiology and treatment of reproductive disorder. Combining two dimensions for a given medical epistemology, the (empirical/ habitual) basis of its transmission and the (open/closed) relation with other epistemologies, four types are proposed: monism, dualism, pluralism, and radical empiricism. The concept of peasant intellectuals, it is argued, needs to be rethought in contexts of medicinal initiation.},
  author       = {Stroeken, Koenraad},
  issn         = {1364-8470},
  journal      = {ANTHROPOLOGY \& MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {traditional medicine,epistemology,mental health,Sukuma,ethnopharmacology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {119--128},
  title        = {Health care decisions by Sukuma 'peasant intellectuals': a case of radical empiricism?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13648470.2012.660464},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Stroeken, Koenraad. 2012. “Health Care Decisions by Sukuma ‘Peasant Intellectuals’: a Case of Radical Empiricism?” Anthropology & Medicine 19 (1): 119–128.
APA
Stroeken, K. (2012). Health care decisions by Sukuma “peasant intellectuals”: a case of radical empiricism? ANTHROPOLOGY & MEDICINE, 19(1), 119–128.
Vancouver
1.
Stroeken K. Health care decisions by Sukuma “peasant intellectuals”: a case of radical empiricism? ANTHROPOLOGY & MEDICINE. 2012;19(1):119–28.
MLA
Stroeken, Koenraad. “Health Care Decisions by Sukuma ‘Peasant Intellectuals’: a Case of Radical Empiricism?” ANTHROPOLOGY & MEDICINE 19.1 (2012): 119–128. Print.