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Easing the conscience: feeling guilty makes people cooperate in divorce negotiations

Anne Wietzker, Ann Buysse UGent, Tom Loeys UGent and Ruben Brondeel UGent (2012) JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS. 29(3). p.324-336
abstract
Guilt is an emotion commonly experienced in divorce. Although guilt has been shown to increase cooperative negotiation behavior in organizational contexts, this is the first investigation of the role of guilt in divorce negotiations. Using survey data of 457 divorcing individuals, the authors examined how guilt was related to the most relevant negotiation styles, while controlling for the guilt-overlapping emotions shame and regret. Guilt was related to cooperative negotiation behavior (i.e., more yielding and problem-solving behavior, and less forcing behavior). Shame was related to uncooperative negotiation behavior (i.e., more forcing, more avoiding, less problem-solving behavior), whereas regret had no additional explanatory value.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
EMOTIONS, BEHAVIOR, COGNITIVE APPRAISAL, CONFLICT-MANAGEMENT, REGRET, SHAME, SEPARATION, GOALS, ANGER, HARM, divorce, guilt, mediation, negotiation, regret, shame
journal title
JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
J. Soc. Pers. Relatsh.
volume
29
issue
3
pages
324 - 336
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000302991700003
JCR category
COMMUNICATION
JCR impact factor
1.131 (2012)
JCR rank
23/72 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0265-4075
DOI
10.1177/0265407511431180
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2109077
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2109077
date created
2012-05-16 17:02:06
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:57
@article{2109077,
  abstract     = {Guilt is an emotion commonly experienced in divorce. Although guilt has been shown to increase cooperative negotiation behavior in organizational contexts, this is the first investigation of the role of guilt in divorce negotiations. Using survey data of 457 divorcing individuals, the authors examined how guilt was related to the most relevant negotiation styles, while controlling for the guilt-overlapping emotions shame and regret. Guilt was related to cooperative negotiation behavior (i.e., more yielding and problem-solving behavior, and less forcing behavior). Shame was related to uncooperative negotiation behavior (i.e., more forcing, more avoiding, less problem-solving behavior), whereas regret had no additional explanatory value.},
  author       = {Wietzker, Anne and Buysse, Ann and Loeys, Tom and Brondeel, Ruben},
  issn         = {0265-4075},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS},
  keyword      = {EMOTIONS,BEHAVIOR,COGNITIVE APPRAISAL,CONFLICT-MANAGEMENT,REGRET,SHAME,SEPARATION,GOALS,ANGER,HARM,divorce,guilt,mediation,negotiation,regret,shame},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {324--336},
  title        = {Easing the conscience: feeling guilty makes people cooperate in divorce negotiations},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0265407511431180},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Wietzker, Anne, Ann Buysse, Tom Loeys, and Ruben Brondeel. 2012. “Easing the Conscience: Feeling Guilty Makes People Cooperate in Divorce Negotiations.” Journal of Social and Personal Relationships 29 (3): 324–336.
APA
Wietzker, A., Buysse, A., Loeys, T., & Brondeel, R. (2012). Easing the conscience: feeling guilty makes people cooperate in divorce negotiations. JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, 29(3), 324–336.
Vancouver
1.
Wietzker A, Buysse A, Loeys T, Brondeel R. Easing the conscience: feeling guilty makes people cooperate in divorce negotiations. JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS. 2012;29(3):324–36.
MLA
Wietzker, Anne, Ann Buysse, Tom Loeys, et al. “Easing the Conscience: Feeling Guilty Makes People Cooperate in Divorce Negotiations.” JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS 29.3 (2012): 324–336. Print.