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Indirect evidence for microbiota reduction through dietary mannanoligosaccharides in the pigeon, an avian species without functional caeca

Enass Abd El-Khalek UGent, Isabelle Kalmar UGent, Merel De Vroey, Richard Ducatelle UGent, Frank Pasmans UGent, Guy Werquin and Geert Janssens UGent (2012) JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION. 96(6). p.1084-1090
abstract
A feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of mannanoligosaccharides (MOS) on nutrient digestibility, intestinal pH, gut morphology and faecal bacteriology of pigeons, as model for birds without functional caeca. Sixteen adult pigeons (Columba livia domestica) were randomly allotted to either an extruded pellet diet with or without 0.4% MOS. After an adaptation period of 24 days, excreta were collected during 4 days. Apparent nutrient digestibility coefficients were determined using total collection method. Further, excreta pH was measured and percentage of uric acid determined. Fresh excreta were cultured for measurement of colonyforming units for Escherichia coli. At the end, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was excised and pH measurements performed on the separate GIT sections. Finally, pancreas, liver, gizzard and abdominal fat pad were weighed, and standardised segments of duodenum and jejunum were removed for microscopic measurement of crypt depth, villus height and muscularis thickness. Feed intake and water intake were similar between control diet and MOS diet. Intestinal pH was unaffected by MOS supplementation; however, excreta pH was significantly lower in pigeons on the MOS diet. Although nutrient digestibility was similar between treatments, uric acid content of excreta was significantly higher in the MOS group in relation to the control group. Further, duodenal crypt depth, villus height and muscularis thickness, as well as jejunal muscularis thickness were all significantly reduced by MOS supplementation. No effect of MOS supplementation was seen on the counts of E. coli. Furthermore, despite marked differences on both GIT morphology and uric acid content of excreta, apparent digestibility coefficients, and organ weights, were similar between treatments. It is suggested that the MOS-induced changes on gut morphology and the reduced excreta pH reflect a reduced bacterial challenge in the intestine of pigeons. Supplementation of MOS, therefore, has potential as prebiotic strategy in birds without functional caeca.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
intestinal morphology, NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY, pigeon, feed additive, mannanoligosaccharides, gut health, MOS, GROWTH-PERFORMANCE, BROILER-CHICKENS, SALMONELLA-TYPHIMURIUM, FECAL CHARACTERISTICS, OLIGOSACCHARIDES, SUPPLEMENTATION, INULIN, DOGS, OLIGOFRUCTOSE
journal title
JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION
J. Anim. Physiol. Anim. Nutr.
volume
96
issue
6
pages
1084 - 1090
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000314234700016
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
1.254 (2012)
JCR rank
15/54 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0931-2439
DOI
10.1111/j.1439-0396.2011.01223.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2108345
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2108345
date created
2012-05-16 10:34:35
date last changed
2013-07-05 15:54:17
@article{2108345,
  abstract     = {A feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of mannanoligosaccharides (MOS) on nutrient digestibility, intestinal pH, gut morphology and faecal bacteriology of pigeons, as model for birds without functional caeca. Sixteen adult pigeons (Columba livia domestica) were randomly allotted to either an extruded pellet diet with or without 0.4\% MOS. After an adaptation period of 24 days, excreta were collected during 4 days. Apparent nutrient digestibility coefficients were determined using total collection method. Further, excreta pH was measured and percentage of uric acid determined. Fresh excreta were cultured for measurement of colonyforming units for Escherichia coli. At the end, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was excised and pH measurements performed on the separate GIT sections. Finally, pancreas, liver, gizzard and abdominal fat pad were weighed, and standardised segments of duodenum and jejunum were removed for microscopic measurement of crypt depth, villus height and muscularis thickness. Feed intake and water intake were similar between control diet and MOS diet. Intestinal pH was unaffected by MOS supplementation; however, excreta pH was significantly lower in pigeons on the MOS diet. Although nutrient digestibility was similar between treatments, uric acid content of excreta was significantly higher in the MOS group in relation to the control group. Further, duodenal crypt depth, villus height and muscularis thickness, as well as jejunal muscularis thickness were all significantly reduced by MOS supplementation. No effect of MOS supplementation was seen on the counts of E. coli. Furthermore, despite marked
differences on both GIT morphology and uric acid content of excreta, apparent digestibility coefficients, and organ weights, were similar between treatments. It is suggested that the MOS-induced changes on gut morphology and the reduced excreta pH reflect a reduced bacterial challenge in the intestine of pigeons. Supplementation of MOS, therefore, has potential as prebiotic strategy in birds without functional caeca.},
  author       = {Abd El-Khalek, Enass and Kalmar, Isabelle and De Vroey, Merel and Ducatelle, Richard and Pasmans, Frank and Werquin, Guy and Janssens, Geert},
  issn         = {0931-2439},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION},
  keyword      = {intestinal morphology,NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY,pigeon,feed additive,mannanoligosaccharides,gut health,MOS,GROWTH-PERFORMANCE,BROILER-CHICKENS,SALMONELLA-TYPHIMURIUM,FECAL CHARACTERISTICS,OLIGOSACCHARIDES,SUPPLEMENTATION,INULIN,DOGS,OLIGOFRUCTOSE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1084--1090},
  title        = {Indirect evidence for microbiota reduction through dietary mannanoligosaccharides in the pigeon, an avian species without functional caeca},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0396.2011.01223.x},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Abd El-Khalek, Enass, Isabelle Kalmar, Merel De Vroey, Richard Ducatelle, Frank Pasmans, Guy Werquin, and Geert Janssens. 2012. “Indirect Evidence for Microbiota Reduction Through Dietary Mannanoligosaccharides in the Pigeon, an Avian Species Without Functional Caeca.” Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 96 (6): 1084–1090.
APA
Abd El-Khalek, E., Kalmar, I., De Vroey, M., Ducatelle, R., Pasmans, F., Werquin, G., & Janssens, G. (2012). Indirect evidence for microbiota reduction through dietary mannanoligosaccharides in the pigeon, an avian species without functional caeca. JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION, 96(6), 1084–1090.
Vancouver
1.
Abd El-Khalek E, Kalmar I, De Vroey M, Ducatelle R, Pasmans F, Werquin G, et al. Indirect evidence for microbiota reduction through dietary mannanoligosaccharides in the pigeon, an avian species without functional caeca. JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION. 2012;96(6):1084–90.
MLA
Abd El-Khalek, Enass, Isabelle Kalmar, Merel De Vroey, et al. “Indirect Evidence for Microbiota Reduction Through Dietary Mannanoligosaccharides in the Pigeon, an Avian Species Without Functional Caeca.” JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION 96.6 (2012): 1084–1090. Print.