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Modeling the impact of partial hepatectomy on the hepatic hemodynamics using a rat model

Charlotte Debbaut UGent, David De Wilde, Christophe Casteleyn UGent, Pieter Cornillie UGent, Denis Van Loo, Luc Van Hoorebeke UGent, Diethard Monbaliu, Ye-Dong Fan and Patrick Segers UGent (2012) IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING. 59(12). p.3293-3303
abstract
Due to the growing shortage of donor livers, more patients are waiting for transplantation. Living donor liver transplantation may help expanding the donor pool, but is often confronted with the small-for-size syndrome. Since the hemodynamic effects of partial hepatectomy are not fully understood, we developed an electrical rat liver model to compare normal with resected liver hemodynamics. Detailed geometrical data and 3D reconstructions of the liver vasculature of two rats were gathered by combining vascular corrosion casting, micro-CT scanning and image processing. Data extrapolations allowed obtaining a total liver pressure- and flow-driven electrical analogue. Subsequently, virtual resections led to 70%, 80% or 90% partial hepatectomy models. Results demonstrated hyperperfusion effects such as portal hypertension and elevated lobe-specific portal venous flows (11 mmHg, 12 mmHg, 24 mmHg and 1.0-3.0 ml/min, 1.8-3.5 ml/min, 7.4 ml/min for 70%, 80%, 90% hepatectomy, respectively). Comparison of two 90% resection techniques demonstrated different total arterial flows (0.28 ml/min versus 0.61 ml/min), portal (24 mmHg versus 21 mmHg) and sinusoidal pressures (14 mmHg versus 9.5- 12 mmHg), probably leading to better survival for lower portal and sinusoidal pressures. Towards the future, the models may be extrapolated to human livers and help to optimize hepatectomy planning.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
REGENERATION, VASCULATURE, SHEAR-STRESS, FOR-SIZE GRAFTS, DONOR LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION, liver, fluid dynamics, biological system modeling, Biomedical engineering, biomedical image processing, PERFUSION, RESECTION, RESISTANCE, PRESSURE, SURVIVAL
journal title
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng.
volume
59
issue
12
pages
3293 - 3303
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000311843500004
JCR category
ENGINEERING, BIOMEDICAL
JCR impact factor
2.348 (2012)
JCR rank
26/77 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0018-9294
DOI
10.1109/TBME.2012.2199108
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2106059
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2106059
date created
2012-05-14 14:21:46
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:57
@article{2106059,
  abstract     = {Due to the growing shortage of donor livers, more patients are waiting for transplantation. Living donor liver transplantation may help expanding the donor pool, but is often confronted with the small-for-size syndrome. Since the hemodynamic effects of partial hepatectomy are not fully understood, we developed an electrical rat liver model to compare normal with resected liver hemodynamics. Detailed geometrical data and 3D reconstructions of the liver vasculature of two rats were gathered by combining vascular corrosion casting, micro-CT scanning and image processing. Data extrapolations allowed obtaining a total liver pressure- and flow-driven electrical analogue. Subsequently, virtual resections led to 70\%, 80\% or 90\% partial hepatectomy models. Results demonstrated hyperperfusion effects such as portal hypertension and elevated lobe-specific portal venous flows (11 mmHg, 12 mmHg, 24 mmHg and 1.0-3.0 ml/min, 1.8-3.5 ml/min, 7.4 ml/min for 70\%, 80\%, 90\% hepatectomy, respectively). Comparison of two 90\% resection techniques demonstrated different total arterial flows (0.28 ml/min versus 0.61 ml/min), portal (24 mmHg versus 21 mmHg) and sinusoidal pressures (14 mmHg versus 9.5- 12 mmHg), probably leading to better survival for lower portal and sinusoidal pressures. Towards the future, the models may be extrapolated to human livers and help to optimize hepatectomy planning.},
  author       = {Debbaut, Charlotte and De Wilde, David and Casteleyn, Christophe and Cornillie, Pieter and Van Loo, Denis and Van Hoorebeke, Luc and Monbaliu, Diethard and Fan, Ye-Dong and Segers, Patrick},
  issn         = {0018-9294},
  journal      = {IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING},
  keyword      = {REGENERATION,VASCULATURE,SHEAR-STRESS,FOR-SIZE GRAFTS,DONOR LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION,liver,fluid dynamics,biological system modeling,Biomedical engineering,biomedical image processing,PERFUSION,RESECTION,RESISTANCE,PRESSURE,SURVIVAL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {3293--3303},
  title        = {Modeling the impact of partial hepatectomy on the hepatic hemodynamics using a rat model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TBME.2012.2199108},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Debbaut, Charlotte, David De Wilde, Christophe Casteleyn, Pieter Cornillie, Denis Van Loo, Luc Van Hoorebeke, Diethard Monbaliu, Ye-Dong Fan, and Patrick Segers. 2012. “Modeling the Impact of Partial Hepatectomy on the Hepatic Hemodynamics Using a Rat Model.” Ieee Transactions on Biomedical Engineering 59 (12): 3293–3303.
APA
Debbaut, C., De Wilde, D., Casteleyn, C., Cornillie, P., Van Loo, D., Van Hoorebeke, L., Monbaliu, D., et al. (2012). Modeling the impact of partial hepatectomy on the hepatic hemodynamics using a rat model. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, 59(12), 3293–3303.
Vancouver
1.
Debbaut C, De Wilde D, Casteleyn C, Cornillie P, Van Loo D, Van Hoorebeke L, et al. Modeling the impact of partial hepatectomy on the hepatic hemodynamics using a rat model. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING. 2012;59(12):3293–303.
MLA
Debbaut, Charlotte, David De Wilde, Christophe Casteleyn, et al. “Modeling the Impact of Partial Hepatectomy on the Hepatic Hemodynamics Using a Rat Model.” IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 59.12 (2012): 3293–3303. Print.