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Comparing systemic defence-related gene expression changes upon migratory and sedentary nematode attack in rice

Tina Kyndt UGent, Kamrun Nahar UGent, Annelies Haegeman UGent, David De Vleesschauwer UGent, Monica Höfte UGent and Godelieve Gheysen UGent (2012) PLANT BIOLOGY. 14(suppl. 1). p.73-82
abstract
Complex defence signalling pathways, controlled by different hormones, are known to be involved in the reaction of plants to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stress factors. Here, we studied the differential expression of genes involved in stress and defence responses in systemic tissue of rice infected with the root knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne graminicola and the migratory root rot nematode Hirschmanniella oryzae, two agronomically important rice pathogens with very different lifestyles. qRT-PCR revealed that all investigated systemic tissues had significantly lower expression of isochorismate synthase, a key enzyme for salicylic acid production involved in basal defence and systemic acquired resistance. The systemic defence response upon migratory nematode infection was remarkably similar to fungal rice blast infection. Almost all investigated defence-related genes were up-regulated in rice shoots 3 days after root rot nematode attack, including the phenylpropanoid pathway, ethylene pathway and PR genes, but many of which were suppressed at 7 dpi. Systemic shoot tissue of RKN-infected plants showed similar attenuation of expression of almost all studied genes already at 3 dpi, with clear attenuation of the ethylene pathway and methyl jasmonate biosynthesis. These results provide an interesting starting point for further studies to elucidate how nematodes are able to suppress systemic plant defence mechanisms and the effect in multitrophic interactions.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Hormones, nematode infection, Oryza sativa, plant defence, systemic response, ROOT-KNOT NEMATODE, ALLENE-OXIDE-SYNTHASE, REAL-TIME PCR, SALICYLIC-ACID, JASMONIC ACID, MELOIDOGYNE-ARTIELLIA, HETERODERA-SCHACHTII, ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA, DISEASE RESISTANCE, MAGNAPORTHE-ORYZAE
journal title
PLANT BIOLOGY
Plant Biol.
volume
14
issue
suppl. 1
pages
73 - 82
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000300681300010
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.32 (2012)
JCR rank
56/193 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
1435-8603
DOI
10.1111/j.1438-8677.2011.00524.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2104559
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2104559
date created
2012-05-10 17:32:34
date last changed
2012-05-11 09:35:20
@article{2104559,
  abstract     = {Complex defence signalling pathways, controlled by different hormones, are known to be involved in the reaction of plants to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stress factors. Here, we studied the differential expression of genes involved in stress and defence responses in systemic tissue of rice infected with the root knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne graminicola and the migratory root rot nematode Hirschmanniella oryzae, two agronomically important rice pathogens with very different lifestyles. qRT-PCR revealed that all investigated systemic tissues had significantly lower expression of isochorismate synthase, a key enzyme for salicylic acid production involved in basal defence and systemic acquired resistance. The systemic defence response upon migratory nematode infection was remarkably similar to fungal rice blast infection. Almost all investigated defence-related genes were up-regulated in rice shoots 3 days after root rot nematode attack, including the phenylpropanoid pathway, ethylene pathway and PR genes, but many of which were suppressed at 7 dpi. Systemic shoot tissue of RKN-infected plants showed similar attenuation of expression of almost all studied genes already at 3 dpi, with clear attenuation of the ethylene pathway and methyl jasmonate biosynthesis. These results provide an interesting starting point for further studies to elucidate how nematodes are able to suppress systemic plant defence mechanisms and the effect in multitrophic interactions.},
  author       = {Kyndt, Tina and Nahar, Kamrun and Haegeman, Annelies and De Vleesschauwer, David and H{\"o}fte, Monica and Gheysen, Godelieve},
  issn         = {1435-8603},
  journal      = {PLANT BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Hormones,nematode infection,Oryza sativa,plant defence,systemic response,ROOT-KNOT NEMATODE,ALLENE-OXIDE-SYNTHASE,REAL-TIME PCR,SALICYLIC-ACID,JASMONIC ACID,MELOIDOGYNE-ARTIELLIA,HETERODERA-SCHACHTII,ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA,DISEASE RESISTANCE,MAGNAPORTHE-ORYZAE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {suppl. 1},
  pages        = {73--82},
  title        = {Comparing systemic defence-related gene expression changes upon migratory and sedentary nematode attack in rice},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1438-8677.2011.00524.x},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Kyndt, Tina, Kamrun Nahar, Annelies Haegeman, David De Vleesschauwer, Monica Höfte, and Godelieve Gheysen. 2012. “Comparing Systemic Defence-related Gene Expression Changes Upon Migratory and Sedentary Nematode Attack in Rice.” Plant Biology 14 (suppl. 1): 73–82.
APA
Kyndt, T., Nahar, K., Haegeman, A., De Vleesschauwer, D., Höfte, M., & Gheysen, G. (2012). Comparing systemic defence-related gene expression changes upon migratory and sedentary nematode attack in rice. PLANT BIOLOGY, 14(suppl. 1), 73–82.
Vancouver
1.
Kyndt T, Nahar K, Haegeman A, De Vleesschauwer D, Höfte M, Gheysen G. Comparing systemic defence-related gene expression changes upon migratory and sedentary nematode attack in rice. PLANT BIOLOGY. 2012;14(suppl. 1):73–82.
MLA
Kyndt, Tina, Kamrun Nahar, Annelies Haegeman, et al. “Comparing Systemic Defence-related Gene Expression Changes Upon Migratory and Sedentary Nematode Attack in Rice.” PLANT BIOLOGY 14.suppl. 1 (2012): 73–82. Print.