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Bioaugmentation as a tool to protect the structure and function of an activated-sludge microbial community against a 3-chloroaniline shock load

Nico Boon UGent, Eva M Top, Willy Verstraete UGent and Steven D Siciliano (2003) APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 69(3). p.1511-1520
abstract
Bioaugmentation of bioreactors focuses on the removal of xenobiotics, with little attention typically paid to the recovery of disrupted reactor functions such as ammonium-nitrogen removal. Chloroanilines are widely used in industry as a precursor to a variety of products and are occasionally released into wastewater streams. This work evaluated the effects on activated-sludge reactor functions of a 3-chloroaniline (3-CA) pulse and bioaugmentation by inoculation with the 3-CA-degrading strain Comamonas testosteroni I2 gfp. Changes in functions such as nitrification, carbon removal, and sludge compaction were studied in relation to the sludge community structure, in particular the nitrifying populations. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), real-time PCR, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to characterize and enumerate the ammonia-oxidizing microbial community immediately after a 3-CA shock load. Two days after the 3-CA shock, ammonium accumulated, and the nitrification activity did not recover over a 12-day period in the nonbioaugmented reactors. In contrast, nitrification in the bioaugmented reactor started to recover on day 4. The DGGE patterns and the FISH and real-time PCR data showed that the ammonia-oxidizing microbial community of the bioaugmented reactor recovered in structure, activity, and abundance, while the number of ribosomes of the ammonia oxidizers in the nonbioaugmented reactor decreased drastically and the community composition changed and did not recover. The settleability of the activated sludge was negatively influenced by the 3-CA addition, with the sludge volume index increasing by a factor of 2.3. Two days after the 3-CA shock in the nonbioaugmented reactor, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency decreased by 36% but recovered fully by day 4. In contrast, in the bioaugmented reactor, no decrease of the COD removal efficiency was observed. This study demonstrates that bioaugmentation of wastewater reactors to accelerate the degradation of toxic chlorinated organics such as 3-CA protected the nitrifying bacterial community, thereby allowing faster recovery from toxic shocks.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
FILAMENTOUS BACTERIA, SEQUENCE HETEROGENEITIES, DIVERSITY, GENES, PCR, PLANTS, IN-SITU DETECTION, AMMONIA-OXIDIZING BACTERIA, 16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA, GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS
journal title
APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
volume
69
issue
3
pages
1511-1520 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000181435600024
JCR category
BIOTECHNOLOGY & APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.82 (2003)
JCR rank
15/132 (2003)
JCR quartile
1 (2003)
ISSN
0099-2240
DOI
10.1128/AEM.69.3.1511-1520.2003
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
209892
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-209892
date created
2004-04-09 11:46:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:00
@article{209892,
  abstract     = {Bioaugmentation of bioreactors focuses on the removal of xenobiotics, with little attention typically paid to the recovery of disrupted reactor functions such as ammonium-nitrogen removal. Chloroanilines are widely used in industry as a precursor to a variety of products and are occasionally released into wastewater streams. This work evaluated the effects on activated-sludge reactor functions of a 3-chloroaniline (3-CA) pulse and bioaugmentation by inoculation with the 3-CA-degrading strain Comamonas testosteroni I2 gfp. Changes in functions such as nitrification, carbon removal, and sludge compaction were studied in relation to the sludge community structure, in particular the nitrifying populations. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), real-time PCR, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to characterize and enumerate the ammonia-oxidizing microbial community immediately after a 3-CA shock load. Two days after the 3-CA shock, ammonium accumulated, and the nitrification activity did not recover over a 12-day period in the nonbioaugmented reactors. In contrast, nitrification in the bioaugmented reactor started to recover on day 4. The DGGE patterns and the FISH and real-time PCR data showed that the ammonia-oxidizing microbial community of the bioaugmented reactor recovered in structure, activity, and abundance, while the number of ribosomes of the ammonia oxidizers in the nonbioaugmented reactor decreased drastically and the community composition changed and did not recover. The settleability of the activated sludge was negatively influenced by the 3-CA addition, with the sludge volume index increasing by a factor of 2.3. Two days after the 3-CA shock in the nonbioaugmented reactor, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency decreased by 36\% but recovered fully by day 4. In contrast, in the bioaugmented reactor, no decrease of the COD removal efficiency was observed. This study demonstrates that bioaugmentation of wastewater reactors to accelerate the degradation of toxic chlorinated organics such as 3-CA protected the nitrifying bacterial community, thereby allowing faster recovery from toxic shocks.},
  author       = {Boon, Nico and Top, Eva M and Verstraete, Willy and Siciliano, Steven D},
  issn         = {0099-2240},
  journal      = {APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {FILAMENTOUS BACTERIA,SEQUENCE HETEROGENEITIES,DIVERSITY,GENES,PCR,PLANTS,IN-SITU DETECTION,AMMONIA-OXIDIZING BACTERIA,16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA,GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1511--1520},
  title        = {Bioaugmentation as a tool to protect the structure and function of an activated-sludge microbial community against a 3-chloroaniline shock load},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.69.3.1511-1520.2003},
  volume       = {69},
  year         = {2003},
}

Chicago
Boon, Nico, Eva M Top, Willy Verstraete, and Steven D Siciliano. 2003. “Bioaugmentation as a Tool to Protect the Structure and Function of an Activated-sludge Microbial Community Against a 3-chloroaniline Shock Load.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology 69 (3): 1511–1520.
APA
Boon, N., Top, E. M., Verstraete, W., & Siciliano, S. D. (2003). Bioaugmentation as a tool to protect the structure and function of an activated-sludge microbial community against a 3-chloroaniline shock load. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 69(3), 1511–1520.
Vancouver
1.
Boon N, Top EM, Verstraete W, Siciliano SD. Bioaugmentation as a tool to protect the structure and function of an activated-sludge microbial community against a 3-chloroaniline shock load. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2003;69(3):1511–20.
MLA
Boon, Nico, Eva M Top, Willy Verstraete, et al. “Bioaugmentation as a Tool to Protect the Structure and Function of an Activated-sludge Microbial Community Against a 3-chloroaniline Shock Load.” APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 69.3 (2003): 1511–1520. Print.