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A new method to determine the energy saving night temperature for vegetative growth of Phalaenopsis

(2011) ANNALS OF APPLIED BIOLOGY. 158(3). p.331-345
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Abstract
Knowledge of the energy saving night temperature (i.e. a relatively cool night temperature without affecting photosynthetic activity and physiology) and a better understanding of low night temperature effects on the photosynthetic physiology of Phalaenopsis would improve their production in terms of greenhouse temperature control and energy use. Therefore, Phalaenopsis 'Hercules' was subjected to day temperatures of 27.5 degrees C and night temperatures of 27.0 degrees C, 24.2 degrees C, 21.2 degrees C, 18.3 degrees C, 15.3 degrees C or 12.3 degrees C in a growth chamber. A new tool for the determination of the energy saving night temperature range was developed based on temperature response curves of leaf net CO(2) exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, organic acid content and carbohydrate concentrations. The newly developed method was validated during a complete vegetative cultivation in a greenhouse environment with eight Phalaenopsis hybrids (i.e. 'Boston', 'Bristol', 'Chalk Dust', 'Fire Fly', 'Lennestadt', 'Liverpool', 'Precious', 'Vivaldi') and day/night temperature set points of 28/28 degrees C, 29/23 degrees C and 29/17 degrees C. Temperature response curves revealed an overall energy saving night temperature range for nocturnal CO(2) uptake, carbohydrate metabolism, organic acid accumulation and photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry of 17.1 degrees C to 19.9 degrees C for Phalaenopsis 'Hercules'. At the lower end of this energy saving night temperature range, a high malate-to-citrate ratio switched towards a low ratio and this transition seemed to alleviate effects of night chilling induced photoinhibition. At night temperatures of 24 degrees C or higher, the degradation of starch, glucose and fructose indicated an increased respiratory CO(2) production. During the greenhouse validation experiment, the differences between the eight Phalaenopsis hybrids with regard to their response to the warm day/cool night temperature regimes were remarkably large. In general, the day/night temperature of 29/17 degrees C led to a significantly lower biomass accumulation and less leaves which were in addition shorter, narrower and smaller in size as compared to the day/night temperature regimes of 28/28 degrees C and 29/23 degrees C. During week 25 of the cultivation period, plants matured and flower initiation steeply increased for all hybrids and in each day/night temperature regime. Before week 25, early spiking was only sufficiently suppressed in the 29/23 degrees C and 29/17 degrees C temperature regimes for three hybrids ('Boston', 'Bristol' and 'Lennestadt') but not in the other five hybrids. Although a considerable biochemical flexibility was demonstrated for Phalaenopsis 'Hercules', inhibition of flowering after exposure to a combination of warm days and cool nights appeared to be largely hybrid dependent.
Keywords
DAY/NIGHT TEMPERATURE, HEAT TOLERANCE, CAM PHOTOSYNTHESIS, CO2 CONCENTRATION, CRASSULACEAN ACID METABOLISM, CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE PARAMETERS, PHOSPHOENOLPYRUVATE CARBOXYLASE, ANANAS-COMOSUS, CLUSIA-MINOR, PHOTOSYNTHETIC EFFICIENCY, temperature response curve, photosynthesis, organic acid, orchid, optimal temperature, crassulacean acid metabolism, chlorophyll fluorescence, Carbohydrates

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Citation

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Chicago
Pollet, Bruno, Arca Kromwijk, Lynn Vanhaecke, Pieter Dambre, Marie-Christine Van Labeke, Leo Marcelis, and Kathy Steppe. 2011. “A New Method to Determine the Energy Saving Night Temperature for Vegetative Growth of Phalaenopsis.” Annals of Applied Biology 158 (3): 331–345.
APA
Pollet, B., Kromwijk, A., Vanhaecke, L., Dambre, P., Van Labeke, M.-C., Marcelis, L., & Steppe, K. (2011). A new method to determine the energy saving night temperature for vegetative growth of Phalaenopsis. ANNALS OF APPLIED BIOLOGY, 158(3), 331–345.
Vancouver
1.
Pollet B, Kromwijk A, Vanhaecke L, Dambre P, Van Labeke M-C, Marcelis L, et al. A new method to determine the energy saving night temperature for vegetative growth of Phalaenopsis. ANNALS OF APPLIED BIOLOGY. 2011;158(3):331–45.
MLA
Pollet, Bruno, Arca Kromwijk, Lynn Vanhaecke, et al. “A New Method to Determine the Energy Saving Night Temperature for Vegetative Growth of Phalaenopsis.” ANNALS OF APPLIED BIOLOGY 158.3 (2011): 331–345. Print.
@article{2097481,
  abstract     = {Knowledge of the energy saving night temperature (i.e. a relatively cool night temperature without affecting photosynthetic activity and physiology) and a better understanding of low night temperature effects on the photosynthetic physiology of Phalaenopsis would improve their production in terms of greenhouse temperature control and energy use. Therefore, Phalaenopsis 'Hercules' was subjected to day temperatures of 27.5 degrees C and night temperatures of 27.0 degrees C, 24.2 degrees C, 21.2 degrees C, 18.3 degrees C, 15.3 degrees C or 12.3 degrees C in a growth chamber. A new tool for the determination of the energy saving night temperature range was developed based on temperature response curves of leaf net CO(2) exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, organic acid content and carbohydrate concentrations. The newly developed method was validated during a complete vegetative cultivation in a greenhouse environment with eight Phalaenopsis hybrids (i.e. 'Boston', 'Bristol', 'Chalk Dust', 'Fire Fly', 'Lennestadt', 'Liverpool', 'Precious', 'Vivaldi') and day/night temperature set points of 28/28 degrees C, 29/23 degrees C and 29/17 degrees C. Temperature response curves revealed an overall energy saving night temperature range for nocturnal CO(2) uptake, carbohydrate metabolism, organic acid accumulation and photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry of 17.1 degrees C to 19.9 degrees C for Phalaenopsis 'Hercules'. At the lower end of this energy saving night temperature range, a high malate-to-citrate ratio switched towards a low ratio and this transition seemed to alleviate effects of night chilling induced photoinhibition. At night temperatures of 24 degrees C or higher, the degradation of starch, glucose and fructose indicated an increased respiratory CO(2) production. During the greenhouse validation experiment, the differences between the eight Phalaenopsis hybrids with regard to their response to the warm day/cool night temperature regimes were remarkably large. In general, the day/night temperature of 29/17 degrees C led to a significantly lower biomass accumulation and less leaves which were in addition shorter, narrower and smaller in size as compared to the day/night temperature regimes of 28/28 degrees C and 29/23 degrees C. During week 25 of the cultivation period, plants matured and flower initiation steeply increased for all hybrids and in each day/night temperature regime. Before week 25, early spiking was only sufficiently suppressed in the 29/23 degrees C and 29/17 degrees C temperature regimes for three hybrids ('Boston', 'Bristol' and 'Lennestadt') but not in the other five hybrids. Although a considerable biochemical flexibility was demonstrated for Phalaenopsis 'Hercules', inhibition of flowering after exposure to a combination of warm days and cool nights appeared to be largely hybrid dependent.},
  author       = {Pollet, Bruno and Kromwijk, Arca and Vanhaecke, Lynn and Dambre, Pieter and Van Labeke, Marie-Christine and Marcelis, Leo and Steppe, Kathy},
  issn         = {0003-4746},
  journal      = {ANNALS OF APPLIED BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {DAY/NIGHT TEMPERATURE,HEAT TOLERANCE,CAM PHOTOSYNTHESIS,CO2 CONCENTRATION,CRASSULACEAN ACID METABOLISM,CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE PARAMETERS,PHOSPHOENOLPYRUVATE CARBOXYLASE,ANANAS-COMOSUS,CLUSIA-MINOR,PHOTOSYNTHETIC EFFICIENCY,temperature response curve,photosynthesis,organic acid,orchid,optimal temperature,crassulacean acid metabolism,chlorophyll fluorescence,Carbohydrates},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {331--345},
  title        = {A new method to determine the energy saving night temperature for vegetative growth of Phalaenopsis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-7348.2011.00470.x},
  volume       = {158},
  year         = {2011},
}

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