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The case of the drunken sailor: on the generalizable wrongness of harmful transgressions

Katinka Quintelier UGent, Daniel MT Fessler and Delphine De Smet (2012) THINKING & REASONING. 18(2). p.183-195
abstract
There is a widespread conviction that people distinguish two kinds of acts: on the one hand, acts that are generalisably wrong because they go against universal principles of harm, justice, or rights; on the other hand, acts that are variably right or wrong depending on the social context. In this paper we criticise existing methods that measure generalisability. We report new findings indicating that a modification of generalisability measures is in order. We discuss our findings in light of recent criticisms of moral/conventional research.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Transgression, Social cognition, Harm, Morality, Moral/conventional distinction
journal title
THINKING & REASONING
Think Reasoning
volume
18
issue
2
pages
183 - 195
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000304316900004
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
1.647 (2012)
JCR rank
47/83 (2012)
JCR quartile
3 (2012)
ISSN
1354-6783
DOI
10.1080/13546783.2012.669738
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2096407
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2096407
date created
2012-04-28 17:37:18
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:24
@article{2096407,
  abstract     = {There is a widespread conviction that people distinguish two kinds of acts: on the one hand, acts that are generalisably wrong because they go against universal principles of harm, justice, or rights; on the other hand, acts that are variably right or wrong depending on the social context. In this paper we criticise existing methods that measure generalisability. We report new findings indicating that a modification of generalisability measures is in order. We discuss our findings in light of recent criticisms of moral/conventional research.},
  author       = {Quintelier, Katinka and Fessler, Daniel MT and De Smet, Delphine},
  issn         = {1354-6783},
  journal      = {THINKING \& REASONING},
  keyword      = {Transgression,Social cognition,Harm,Morality,Moral/conventional distinction},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {183--195},
  title        = {The case of the drunken sailor: on the generalizable wrongness of harmful transgressions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13546783.2012.669738},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Quintelier, Katinka, Daniel MT Fessler, and Delphine De Smet. 2012. “The Case of the Drunken Sailor: On the Generalizable Wrongness of Harmful Transgressions.” Thinking & Reasoning 18 (2): 183–195.
APA
Quintelier, Katinka, Fessler, D. M., & De Smet, D. (2012). The case of the drunken sailor: on the generalizable wrongness of harmful transgressions. THINKING & REASONING, 18(2), 183–195.
Vancouver
1.
Quintelier K, Fessler DM, De Smet D. The case of the drunken sailor: on the generalizable wrongness of harmful transgressions. THINKING & REASONING. 2012;18(2):183–95.
MLA
Quintelier, Katinka, Daniel MT Fessler, and Delphine De Smet. “The Case of the Drunken Sailor: On the Generalizable Wrongness of Harmful Transgressions.” THINKING & REASONING 18.2 (2012): 183–195. Print.