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Second generation biofuels technology watch: resources, technologies, markets

Tom Anthonis UGent (2011)
abstract
This technology watch gives an overview of the existing (1st generation) and future (2nd generation) technologies on the production of biofuels. The report starts with a short overview of the legal EU framework. Further the report focuses on the feedstock to produce 2nd generation biofuels. Biomass is a general term for organic matter derived from plants or animals such as agricultural or energy crops, agricultural waste, wood materials, municipal solid waste or animal manure. Bioenergy refers to the technical systems through which biomass is produced or collected, converted and used as an energy source, in this case as a biofuel. Where in the 1st generation biofuels the feedstock used, was mainly the same as the food crop e.g. sugar beet, corn, wheat, for the 2nd generation biofuels technologies focuses on the use of ligno-cellulosic biomass, the non-edible part of plants and wood or used vegetable oils of animals fats. Two conversions routes can be distinguished to produce out of biomass biofuels for transport, the thermochemical and the biochemical route. A detailed process overview is given for both. Next, for each biofuel a short process description and the state of the technology are given and also future challenges or trends are described. Two main groups can be distinguished, the bio-ethanol as an alternative for gasoline, and biodiesel as an alternative for fossil diesel. Finally the report looks in to some future trends, such as algae, hydrogen and alternative transport ‗fuels‘ as electric vehicles and compressed air. In the field of biofuels, production and use is growing rapidly, with new developments in biofuels markets, increasing production capacity and increasing R&D efforts. Today, biofuels are still more expensive than conventional fuels, but costs are likely to drop as technological innovations boost production efficiency. Still, there will be other challenges for biofuels in the future, including food-versus-fuel concerns, which in the short term could generate negative public backlash, but in the longer term might enforce the use and conversion of non-food biofuel feedstocks. In this regard it is clear that the processing cost of lignocellulosic feedstock should be reduced. Witch biofuel or conversion technologies will prevail in the future is hard to say. Worldwide gasoline is the most used petrol, but in Europe diesel is the most common used fuel. Cost-effective production and reliability in use will be crucial to make any kind of fuel a market player.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
misc (report)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
lignocellulosic biofuels, industrial biotechnology, dme, compressed air, fisher-tropsch, biomethanol, hydrogenation, pyrolysis, thermochemical conversion, biochemical conversion, bioethanol, biofuels, second generation biofuels, etbe, biogas, biodiesel, firt generation biofuels
pages
92 pages
publisher
Generaties
place of publication
Brussels, Belgium
project
IWT - Generaties
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
V
additional info
Limited distribution exclusively among member organisations of GENERATIES (GENERATIES c/o 3E, Vaartstraat 61, 1000 Brussels)
id
2095821
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2095821
date created
2012-04-27 11:01:21
date last changed
2012-04-27 14:15:09
@misc{2095821,
  abstract     = {This technology watch gives an overview of the existing (1st generation) and future (2nd generation) technologies on the production of biofuels.
The report starts with a short overview of the legal EU framework.
Further the report focuses on the feedstock to produce 2nd generation biofuels. Biomass is a general term for organic matter derived from plants or animals such as agricultural or energy crops, agricultural waste, wood materials, municipal solid waste or animal manure. Bioenergy refers to the technical systems through which biomass is produced or collected, converted and used as an energy source, in this case as a biofuel. Where in the 1st generation biofuels the feedstock used, was mainly the same as the food crop e.g. sugar beet, corn, wheat, for the 2nd generation biofuels technologies focuses on the use of ligno-cellulosic biomass, the non-edible part of plants and wood or used vegetable oils of animals fats.
Two conversions routes can be distinguished to produce out of biomass biofuels for transport, the thermochemical and the biochemical route. A detailed process overview is given for both.
Next, for each biofuel a short process description and the state of the technology are given and also future challenges or trends are described. Two main groups can be distinguished, the bio-ethanol as an alternative for gasoline, and biodiesel as an alternative for fossil diesel.
Finally the report looks in to some future trends, such as algae, hydrogen and alternative transport \unmatched{2017}fuels{\textquoteleft} as electric vehicles and compressed air.
In the field of biofuels, production and use is growing rapidly, with new developments in biofuels markets, increasing production capacity and increasing R\&D efforts. Today, biofuels are still more expensive than conventional fuels, but costs are likely to drop as technological innovations boost production efficiency. Still, there will be other challenges for biofuels in the future, including food-versus-fuel concerns, which in the short term could generate negative public backlash, but in the longer term might enforce the use and conversion of non-food biofuel feedstocks. In this regard it is clear that the processing cost of lignocellulosic feedstock should be reduced.
Witch biofuel or conversion technologies will prevail in the future is hard to say. Worldwide gasoline is the most used petrol, but in Europe diesel is the most common used fuel. Cost-effective production and reliability in use will be crucial to make any kind of fuel a market player.},
  author       = {Anthonis, Tom},
  keyword      = {lignocellulosic biofuels,industrial biotechnology,dme,compressed air,fisher-tropsch,biomethanol,hydrogenation,pyrolysis,thermochemical conversion,biochemical conversion,bioethanol,biofuels,second generation biofuels,etbe,biogas,biodiesel,firt generation biofuels},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {92},
  publisher    = {Generaties},
  title        = {Second generation biofuels technology watch: resources, technologies, markets},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Anthonis, Tom. 2011. “Second Generation Biofuels Technology Watch: Resources, Technologies, Markets”. Brussels, Belgium: Generaties.
APA
Anthonis, T. (2011). Second generation biofuels technology watch: resources, technologies, markets. Brussels, Belgium: Generaties.
Vancouver
1.
Anthonis T. Second generation biofuels technology watch: resources, technologies, markets. Brussels, Belgium: Generaties; 2011.
MLA
Anthonis, Tom. “Second Generation Biofuels Technology Watch: Resources, Technologies, Markets.” 2011 : n. pag. Print.