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Impact of agricultural practices on the Zea mays L. endophytic community

Dave Seghers, Lieven Wittebolle UGent, Eva M Top, Willy Verstraete UGent and Steven D Siciliano (2004) APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 70(3). p.1475-1482
abstract
Agricultural practices are known to alter bulk soil microbial communities, but little is known about the effect of such practices on the plant endophytic community. We assessed the influence of long-term applications (20 years) of herbicides and different fertilizer types on the endophytic community of maize plants grown in different field experiments. Nested PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses targeting general bacteria, type I or II methanotrophs, actinomycetes, and general fungi were used to fingerprint the endophytic community in the roots of Zea mays L. Low intraplant variability (reproducible DGGE patterns) was observed for the bacterial, type I methanotroph, and fungal communities, whereas the patterns for endophytic actinomycetes exhibited high intraplant variability. No endophytic amplification product was obtained for type 11 methanotrophs. Cluster and stability analysis of the endophytic type I methanotroph patterns differentiated maize plants cultivated by using mineral fertilizer from plants cultivated by using organic fertilizer with a 100% success rate. In addition, lower methanotroph richness was observed for mineral-fertilized plants than for organically fertilized plants. The use of herbicides could not be traced by fingerprinting the endophytic type I methanotrophs or by evaluating any other endophytic microbial group. Our results indicate that the effect of agrochemicals is not limited to the bulk microbial community but also includes the root endophytic community. It is not clear if this effect is due to a direct effect on the root endophytic community or is due to changes in the bulk community, which are then reflected in the root endophytic community.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS, 16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA, METHANE-OXIDIZING BACTERIA, MOLECULAR ANALYSES, SOIL, DIVERSITY, ROOTS, GENES, PCR, POTATO
journal title
APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
volume
70
issue
3
pages
1475-1482 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000220154800028
JCR category
BIOTECHNOLOGY & APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.81 (2004)
JCR rank
16/133 (2004)
JCR quartile
1 (2004)
ISSN
0099-2240
DOI
10.1128/AEM.70.3.1475-1482.2004
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
209171
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-209171
date created
2004-04-07 11:58:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:01
@article{209171,
  abstract     = {Agricultural practices are known to alter bulk soil microbial communities, but little is known about the effect of such practices on the plant endophytic community. We assessed the influence of long-term applications (20 years) of herbicides and different fertilizer types on the endophytic community of maize plants grown in different field experiments. Nested PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses targeting general bacteria, type I or II methanotrophs, actinomycetes, and general fungi were used to fingerprint the endophytic community in the roots of Zea mays L. Low intraplant variability (reproducible DGGE patterns) was observed for the bacterial, type I methanotroph, and fungal communities, whereas the patterns for endophytic actinomycetes exhibited high intraplant variability. No endophytic amplification product was obtained for type 11 methanotrophs. Cluster and stability analysis of the endophytic type I methanotroph patterns differentiated maize plants cultivated by using mineral fertilizer from plants cultivated by using organic fertilizer with a 100\% success rate. In addition, lower methanotroph richness was observed for mineral-fertilized plants than for organically fertilized plants. The use of herbicides could not be traced by fingerprinting the endophytic type I methanotrophs or by evaluating any other endophytic microbial group. Our results indicate that the effect of agrochemicals is not limited to the bulk microbial community but also includes the root endophytic community. It is not clear if this effect is due to a direct effect on the root endophytic community or is due to changes in the bulk community, which are then reflected in the root endophytic community.},
  author       = {Seghers, Dave and Wittebolle, Lieven and Top, Eva M and Verstraete, Willy and Siciliano, Steven D},
  issn         = {0099-2240},
  journal      = {APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS,16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA,METHANE-OXIDIZING BACTERIA,MOLECULAR ANALYSES,SOIL,DIVERSITY,ROOTS,GENES,PCR,POTATO},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1475--1482},
  title        = {Impact of agricultural practices on the Zea mays L. endophytic community},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.70.3.1475-1482.2004},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {2004},
}

Chicago
Seghers, Dave, Lieven Wittebolle, Eva M Top, Willy Verstraete, and Steven D Siciliano. 2004. “Impact of Agricultural Practices on the Zea Mays L. Endophytic Community.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology 70 (3): 1475–1482.
APA
Seghers, Dave, Wittebolle, L., Top, E. M., Verstraete, W., & Siciliano, S. D. (2004). Impact of agricultural practices on the Zea mays L. endophytic community. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 70(3), 1475–1482.
Vancouver
1.
Seghers D, Wittebolle L, Top EM, Verstraete W, Siciliano SD. Impact of agricultural practices on the Zea mays L. endophytic community. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2004;70(3):1475–82.
MLA
Seghers, Dave, Lieven Wittebolle, Eva M Top, et al. “Impact of Agricultural Practices on the Zea Mays L. Endophytic Community.” APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 70.3 (2004): 1475–1482. Print.