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Is the emotional modulation of the attentional blink driven by response bias?

Helen Tibboel UGent, Bram Van Bockstaele UGent and Jan De Houwer UGent (2011) COGNITION & EMOTION. 25(7). p.1176-1183
abstract
Several studies have shown that the attentional blink (AB; Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992) is diminished for highly arousing T2 stimuli (e.g., Anderson, 2005). Whereas this effect is most often interpreted as evidence for a more efficient processing of arousing information, it could be due also to a bias to report more arousing stimuli than neutral stimuli. We introduce a paradigm that allows one to control for such a response bias. Using this paradigm, we obtained evidence that the diminished AB for taboo words cannot be explained by a response bias. This supports the idea that the emotional modulation of the AB is caused by attentional processes.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
COSTS, BENEFITS, FACES, TASK, Attentional blink, Arousal, Emotion, Attention, Response bias, COMPETITION, IDENTIFICATION, STIMULI, SERIAL VISUAL PRESENTATION
journal title
COGNITION & EMOTION
Cogn. Emot.
volume
25
issue
7
pages
1176 - 1183
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000299564700003
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
2.522 (2011)
JCR rank
22/83 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0269-9931
DOI
10.1080/02699931.2010.524192
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2084142
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2084142
date created
2012-04-11 16:25:06
date last changed
2013-12-30 00:30:31
@article{2084142,
  abstract     = {Several studies have shown that the attentional blink (AB; Raymond, Shapiro, \& Arnell, 1992) is diminished for highly arousing T2 stimuli (e.g., Anderson, 2005). Whereas this effect is most often interpreted as evidence for a more efficient processing of arousing information, it could be due also to a bias to report more arousing stimuli than neutral stimuli. We introduce a paradigm that allows one to control for such a response bias. Using this paradigm, we obtained evidence that the diminished AB for taboo words cannot be explained by a response bias. This supports the idea that the emotional modulation of the AB is caused by attentional processes.},
  author       = {Tibboel, Helen and Van Bockstaele, Bram and De Houwer, Jan},
  issn         = {0269-9931},
  journal      = {COGNITION \& EMOTION},
  keyword      = {COSTS,BENEFITS,FACES,TASK,Attentional blink,Arousal,Emotion,Attention,Response bias,COMPETITION,IDENTIFICATION,STIMULI,SERIAL VISUAL PRESENTATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1176--1183},
  title        = {Is the emotional modulation of the attentional blink driven by response bias?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2010.524192},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Tibboel, Helen, Bram Van Bockstaele, and Jan De Houwer. 2011. “Is the Emotional Modulation of the Attentional Blink Driven by Response Bias?” Cognition & Emotion 25 (7): 1176–1183.
APA
Tibboel, H., Van Bockstaele, B., & De Houwer, J. (2011). Is the emotional modulation of the attentional blink driven by response bias? COGNITION & EMOTION, 25(7), 1176–1183.
Vancouver
1.
Tibboel H, Van Bockstaele B, De Houwer J. Is the emotional modulation of the attentional blink driven by response bias? COGNITION & EMOTION. 2011;25(7):1176–83.
MLA
Tibboel, Helen, Bram Van Bockstaele, and Jan De Houwer. “Is the Emotional Modulation of the Attentional Blink Driven by Response Bias?” COGNITION & EMOTION 25.7 (2011): 1176–1183. Print.