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The impact of bullying and victimization on students' relationships

Jannick Demanet UGent and Mieke Van Houtte UGent (2012) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH EDUCATION. 43(2). p.104-113
abstract
Background. Bullying is antisocial behavior, in which people are willfully and repeatedly hurt. Bullies are perpetrators of this behavior, victims are those who are bullied, and bully/victims are students who both bully others, and are bullied themselves. Bullies, victims, and bully/victims are at risk for psychosomatic health problems. However, few studies have focused on their social health. Purpose. This study explores differences between non-involved students, bullies, victims and bully-victims in self-reported attachment to peers and parents, perceived support from teachers, and belonging to the school, in Flemish secondary schools. Methods. We use data from the Flemish Educational Assessment (FlEA), consisting of 11,872 students in 85 schools. Multivariate analyses of variance (ANOVA) were performed. Results. Non-involved students felt most attached to peers, parents, teachers, and school. Bullies matched the level of parental attachment of the non-involved, and are even more popular among peers. Victims are especially unsuccessful among peers. Bully/victims felt least attached to peers, parents and school, and least supported by teachers. Discussion. Bullies appear to be popular among peers. Victims and bully/victims lack a number of important sources of support. Translation to health education practice. The results of this study endorse peer-group level intervention initiatives. Furthermore, we support whole-school approaches, that include all actors –including pupils, parents, and teachers- in combating bullying.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Victimization, Social relationships, Bullying
journal title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH EDUCATION
Am. j. health educ.
volume
43
issue
2
pages
104 - 113
ISSN
1932-5037
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
VABB id
c:vabb:335998
VABB type
VABB-1
id
2079706
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2079706
date created
2012-04-03 13:04:33
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:00:23
@article{2079706,
  abstract     = {Background. Bullying is antisocial behavior, in which people are willfully and repeatedly hurt. Bullies are perpetrators of this behavior, victims are those who are bullied, and bully/victims are students who both bully others, and are bullied themselves. Bullies, victims, and bully/victims are at risk for psychosomatic health problems. However, few studies have focused on their social health. Purpose. This study explores differences between non-involved students, bullies, victims and bully-victims in self-reported attachment to peers and parents, perceived support from teachers, and belonging to the school, in Flemish secondary schools. Methods. We use data from the Flemish Educational Assessment (FlEA), consisting of 11,872 students in 85 schools. Multivariate analyses of variance (ANOVA) were performed. Results. Non-involved students felt most attached to peers, parents, teachers, and school. Bullies matched the level of parental attachment of the non-involved, and are even more popular among peers. Victims are especially unsuccessful among peers. Bully/victims felt least attached to peers, parents and school, and least supported by teachers. Discussion. Bullies appear to be popular among peers. Victims and bully/victims lack a number of important sources of support. Translation to health education practice. The results of this study endorse peer-group level intervention initiatives. Furthermore, we support whole-school approaches, that include all actors --including pupils, parents, and teachers- in combating bullying.},
  author       = {Demanet, Jannick and Van Houtte, Mieke},
  issn         = {1932-5037},
  journal      = {AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH EDUCATION},
  keyword      = {Victimization,Social relationships,Bullying},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {104--113},
  title        = {The impact of bullying and victimization on students' relationships},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Demanet, Jannick, and Mieke Van Houtte. 2012. “The Impact of Bullying and Victimization on Students’ Relationships.” American Journal of Health Education 43 (2): 104–113.
APA
Demanet, Jannick, & Van Houtte, M. (2012). The impact of bullying and victimization on students’ relationships. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH EDUCATION, 43(2), 104–113.
Vancouver
1.
Demanet J, Van Houtte M. The impact of bullying and victimization on students’ relationships. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH EDUCATION. 2012;43(2):104–13.
MLA
Demanet, Jannick, and Mieke Van Houtte. “The Impact of Bullying and Victimization on Students’ Relationships.” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH EDUCATION 43.2 (2012): 104–113. Print.