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Effects of land use on the fungal spore richness in small crater-lake basins of western Uganda

Vanessa Gelorini UGent, Annemieke Verbeken UGent, Luc Lens UGent, Hilde Eggermont UGent, Bent Vad Odgaard and Dirk Verschuren UGent (2012) FUNGAL DIVERSITY. 55(1). p.125-142
abstract
Mycological tools to estimate the effects of diverse land-use practices on fungal diversity are scarce, because of poor knowledge of the taxonomic diversity of tropical fungi and their response to anthropogenic habitat change. Here, we investigate assemblages of fungal spores, recently deposited in the bottom sediments of 24 small crater lakes in western Uganda, to assess the relationship between the local richness of fungi and environmental variation in the crater basin along regional gradients of natural vegetation and land use. We recovered similar to 9500 fungal spore specimens, which could be attributed to 216 morphotypes. Using an information-theoretic approach based on the corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc), we determined the environmental factors which best explained variation in the diversity of fungal spores among three datasets: (i) the full set of 24 crater basins, (ii) the subset of 22 basins with freshwater lakes, and (iii) the subset of 17 basins partly or completely in agricultural use (cropland, fallow land, pasture and plantation). In these 17 human-impacted crater basins our results revealed a negative relationship between fungal spore richness and the areal fraction of basins in agricultural use. However, this detrimental effect of land use on fungal spore richness was not apparent across the full set of both disturbed and (presently) undisturbed basins. This was due to large variation in fungal spore richness among the undisturbed basins covered either with forest or savannah vegetation, probably resulting from site-specific controls on fungal habitat diversity, such as climatic moisture balance and the composition of natural and/or secondary vegetation. The land-use effects on fungal spore diversity, as documented in this study, suggest that communities of tropical fungi progressively exposed to land-use practices are threatened by species loss. Hence, our study demonstrates the need to develop conservation strategies mitigating the impacts of agriculture on the biodiversity of tropical fungi.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
USE INTENSITY, BIODIVERSITY, SOIL FUNGI, EAST-AFRICA, FRESH-WATER, SPECIES-DIVERSITY, ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI, Western Uganda, Land use, Fungal spores, Lake basins, Richness, HABITAT, ECOSYSTEMS, POLLEN
journal title
FUNGAL DIVERSITY
Fungal Divers.
volume
55
issue
1
pages
125 - 142
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000304142200007
JCR category
MYCOLOGY
JCR impact factor
5.319 (2012)
JCR rank
2/23 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
1560-2745
DOI
10.1007/s13225-012-0155-z
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2069890
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2069890
date created
2012-03-20 11:02:18
date last changed
2012-06-29 13:02:52
@article{2069890,
  abstract     = {Mycological tools to estimate the effects of diverse land-use practices on fungal diversity are scarce, because of poor knowledge of the taxonomic diversity of tropical fungi and their response to anthropogenic habitat change. Here, we investigate assemblages of fungal spores, recently deposited in the bottom sediments of 24 small crater lakes in western Uganda, to assess the relationship between the local richness of fungi and environmental variation in the crater basin along regional gradients of natural vegetation and land use. We recovered similar to 9500 fungal spore specimens, which could be attributed to 216 morphotypes. Using an information-theoretic approach based on the corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc), we determined the environmental factors which best explained variation in the diversity of fungal spores among three datasets: (i) the full set of 24 crater basins, (ii) the subset of 22 basins with freshwater lakes, and (iii) the subset of 17 basins partly or completely in agricultural use (cropland, fallow land, pasture and plantation). In these 17 human-impacted crater basins our results revealed a negative relationship between fungal spore richness and the areal fraction of basins in agricultural use. However, this detrimental effect of land use on fungal spore richness was not apparent across the full set of both disturbed and (presently) undisturbed basins. This was due to large variation in fungal spore richness among the undisturbed basins covered either with forest or savannah vegetation, probably resulting from site-specific controls on fungal habitat diversity, such as climatic moisture balance and the composition of natural and/or secondary vegetation. The land-use effects on fungal spore diversity, as documented in this study, suggest that communities of tropical fungi progressively exposed to land-use practices are threatened by species loss. Hence, our study demonstrates the need to develop conservation strategies mitigating the impacts of agriculture on the biodiversity of tropical fungi.},
  author       = {Gelorini, Vanessa and Verbeken, Annemieke and Lens, Luc and Eggermont, Hilde and Odgaard, Bent Vad and Verschuren, Dirk},
  issn         = {1560-2745},
  journal      = {FUNGAL DIVERSITY},
  keyword      = {USE INTENSITY,BIODIVERSITY,SOIL FUNGI,EAST-AFRICA,FRESH-WATER,SPECIES-DIVERSITY,ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI,Western Uganda,Land use,Fungal spores,Lake basins,Richness,HABITAT,ECOSYSTEMS,POLLEN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {125--142},
  title        = {Effects of land use on the fungal spore richness in small crater-lake basins of western Uganda},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13225-012-0155-z},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Gelorini, Vanessa, Annemieke Verbeken, Luc Lens, Hilde Eggermont, Bent Vad Odgaard, and Dirk Verschuren. 2012. “Effects of Land Use on the Fungal Spore Richness in Small Crater-lake Basins of Western Uganda.” Fungal Diversity 55 (1): 125–142.
APA
Gelorini, V., Verbeken, A., Lens, L., Eggermont, H., Odgaard, B. V., & Verschuren, D. (2012). Effects of land use on the fungal spore richness in small crater-lake basins of western Uganda. FUNGAL DIVERSITY, 55(1), 125–142.
Vancouver
1.
Gelorini V, Verbeken A, Lens L, Eggermont H, Odgaard BV, Verschuren D. Effects of land use on the fungal spore richness in small crater-lake basins of western Uganda. FUNGAL DIVERSITY. 2012;55(1):125–42.
MLA
Gelorini, Vanessa, Annemieke Verbeken, Luc Lens, et al. “Effects of Land Use on the Fungal Spore Richness in Small Crater-lake Basins of Western Uganda.” FUNGAL DIVERSITY 55.1 (2012): 125–142. Print.