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Evaluation of the mayfly Ephoron virgo for European sediment toxicity assessment

Lien Nguyen Thi Hong UGent, Michiel Vandegehuchte UGent, Harm van der Geest and Colin Janssen UGent (2012) JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS. 12(5). p.749-757
abstract
The mayfly Ephoron virgo plays a key role in the ecological recovery in large European rivers. The larvae spend their life in the sediment and are therefore exposed to contaminants in various ways. In this study, the use of E. virgo as a test species for whole sediment bioassays was evaluated. The sensitivity was compared with Hexagenia limbata (a North American mayfly recommended for standard sediment testing). Lead (Pb) was used as a model contaminant. Seven Pb concentrations (range, 100-3,200 mu g g(-1)) were spiked to uncontaminated natural sediment. Prior to the bioassays, spiked sediments were equilibrated for 35 days to ensure the partitioning of Pb among overlying water, pore water and sediment. E. virgo and H. limbata were exposed to Pb-contaminated sediments for 21 days in the test jars containing 250 mg sediment (i.e. 4 cm deep; 250 ml test medium). The exposure was performed as a semi-static system of which overlying water was renewed twice per week. Pb concentrations in pore water and sediment were measured at the beginning and the end of the assays. Pb bioavailability in the sediment was assessed using the equilibrium partitioning model based on acid volatile sulphide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metal (SEM). A clear dose-response relationship between E. virgo survival and Pb toxicity/bioavailability in the sediment was obtained, with the lowest observed effect concentration of 2,071 mu g Pb g(-1) treatment [(SEMPb-AVS)/fraction of organic carbon (OC) = 168.9 mu mol g(-1) OC]. The results also confirmed the SEM-AVS model as no Pb toxicity occurred at (SEMPb-AVS) a parts per thousand currency sign0 mu mol g(-1). Comparing the responses of the two mayfly species exposed to the same Pb-contaminated sediment, E. virgo showed a higher sensitivity. The difference in sensitivity to Pb of the two mayflies could be related to intrinsic species sensitivity. Some factors which might influence sensitivity, i.e. the developmental stage and homogeneity of the larval age at exposure, should also be considered. Comprehensive data for the risk assessment of European sediments may be obtained from sediment bioassays with indigenous species. In this study, a chronic sediment toxicity assay using larvae of E. virgo has been demonstrated. Considering the sensitivity and the need to incorporate more ecologically relevant data, it can be concluded that the 21-day whole sediment toxicity test with E. virgo is a good bioassay for testing sediment toxicity.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Ephoron virgo, Bioavailability, Hexagenia limbata, Mayfly, Pb, Sediment toxicity, ACID-VOLATILE SULFIDE, LABORATORY-FORMULATED SEDIMENT, BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES, CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS, SPIKED SEDIMENTS, HYALELLA-AZTECA, CHIRONOMUS-TENTANS, HEXAGENIA-RIGIDA, MARINE-SEDIMENTS, WATER
journal title
JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS
J. Soils Sediments
volume
12
issue
5
pages
749 - 757
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000302869900010
JCR category
SOIL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
1.965 (2012)
JCR rank
11/34 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
1439-0108
DOI
10.1007/s11368-012-0488-y
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2064550
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2064550
date created
2012-03-12 14:42:11
date last changed
2012-09-28 10:46:45
@article{2064550,
  abstract     = {The mayfly Ephoron virgo plays a key role in the ecological recovery in large European rivers. The larvae spend their life in the sediment and are therefore exposed to contaminants in various ways. In this study, the use of E. virgo as a test species for whole sediment bioassays was evaluated. The sensitivity was compared with Hexagenia limbata (a North American mayfly recommended for standard sediment testing). Lead (Pb) was used as a model contaminant. 
Seven Pb concentrations (range, 100-3,200 mu g g(-1)) were spiked to uncontaminated natural sediment. Prior to the bioassays, spiked sediments were equilibrated for 35 days to ensure the partitioning of Pb among overlying water, pore water and sediment. E. virgo and H. limbata were exposed to Pb-contaminated sediments for 21 days in the test jars containing 250 mg sediment (i.e. 4 cm deep; 250 ml test medium). The exposure was performed as a semi-static system of which overlying water was renewed twice per week. Pb concentrations in pore water and sediment were measured at the beginning and the end of the assays. Pb bioavailability in the sediment was assessed using the equilibrium partitioning model based on acid volatile sulphide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metal (SEM). 
A clear dose-response relationship between E. virgo survival and Pb toxicity/bioavailability in the sediment was obtained, with the lowest observed effect concentration of 2,071 mu g Pb g(-1) treatment [(SEMPb-AVS)/fraction of organic carbon (OC) = 168.9 mu mol g(-1) OC]. The results also confirmed the SEM-AVS model as no Pb toxicity occurred at (SEMPb-AVS) a parts per thousand currency sign0 mu mol g(-1). Comparing the responses of the two mayfly species exposed to the same Pb-contaminated sediment, E. virgo showed a higher sensitivity. The difference in sensitivity to Pb of the two mayflies could be related to intrinsic species sensitivity. Some factors which might influence sensitivity, i.e. the developmental stage and homogeneity of the larval age at exposure, should also be considered. 
Comprehensive data for the risk assessment of European sediments may be obtained from sediment bioassays with indigenous species. In this study, a chronic sediment toxicity assay using larvae of E. virgo has been demonstrated. Considering the sensitivity and the need to incorporate more ecologically relevant data, it can be concluded that the 21-day whole sediment toxicity test with E. virgo is a good bioassay for testing sediment toxicity.},
  author       = {Nguyen Thi Hong, Lien and Vandegehuchte, Michiel and van der Geest, Harm and Janssen, Colin},
  issn         = {1439-0108},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS},
  keyword      = {Ephoron virgo,Bioavailability,Hexagenia limbata,Mayfly,Pb,Sediment toxicity,ACID-VOLATILE SULFIDE,LABORATORY-FORMULATED SEDIMENT,BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES,CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS,SPIKED SEDIMENTS,HYALELLA-AZTECA,CHIRONOMUS-TENTANS,HEXAGENIA-RIGIDA,MARINE-SEDIMENTS,WATER},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {749--757},
  title        = {Evaluation of the mayfly Ephoron virgo for European sediment toxicity assessment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11368-012-0488-y},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Nguyen Thi Hong, Lien, Michiel Vandegehuchte, Harm van der Geest, and Colin Janssen. 2012. “Evaluation of the Mayfly Ephoron Virgo for European Sediment Toxicity Assessment.” Journal of Soils and Sediments 12 (5): 749–757.
APA
Nguyen Thi Hong, L., Vandegehuchte, M., van der Geest, H., & Janssen, C. (2012). Evaluation of the mayfly Ephoron virgo for European sediment toxicity assessment. JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS, 12(5), 749–757.
Vancouver
1.
Nguyen Thi Hong L, Vandegehuchte M, van der Geest H, Janssen C. Evaluation of the mayfly Ephoron virgo for European sediment toxicity assessment. JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS. 2012;12(5):749–57.
MLA
Nguyen Thi Hong, Lien, Michiel Vandegehuchte, Harm van der Geest, et al. “Evaluation of the Mayfly Ephoron Virgo for European Sediment Toxicity Assessment.” JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS 12.5 (2012): 749–757. Print.