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Four decades of post-agricultural forest development have caused major redistributions of soil phosphorus fractions

An De Schrijver UGent, Lars Vesterdal, Karin Hansen, Pieter De Frenne UGent, Laurent Augusto, David Ludovick Achat, Jeroen Staelens UGent, Lander Baeten UGent, Luc De Keersmaeker UGent and Stefaan De Neve UGent, et al. (2012) OECOLOGIA. 169(1). p.221-234
abstract
Fertilisation of agricultural land causes an accumulation of nutrients in the top soil layer, among which phosphorus (P) is particularly persistent. Changing land use from farmland to forest affects soil properties, but changes in P pools have rarely been studied despite their importance to forest ecosystem development. Here, we describe the redistributions of the P pools in a four-decadal chronosequence of post-agricultural common oak (Quercus robur L.) forests in Belgium and Denmark. The aim was to assess whether forest age causes a repartitioning of P throughout the various soil P pools (labile P, slowly cycling P and occluded P); in particular, we addressed the time-related alterations in the inorganic versus organic P fractions. In less than 40 years of oak forest development, significant redistributions have occurred between different P fractions. While both the labile and the slowly cycling inorganic P fractions significantly decreased with forest age, the organic fractions significantly increased. The labile P pool (inorganic + organic), which is considered to be the pool of P most likely to contribute to plant-available P, significantly decreased with forest age (from > 20 to < 10% of total P), except in the 0-5 cm of topsoil, where labile P remained persistently high. The shift from inorganic to organic P and the shifts between the different inorganic P fractions are driven by biological processes and also by physicochemical changes related to forest development. It is concluded that the organic labile P fraction, which is readily mineralisable, should be taken into account when studying the bioavailable P pool in forest ecosystems.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Soil organic matter, Soil pH, Organic and inorganic P, Hedley fractionation, OAK QUERCUS-PETRAEA, FORMER ARABLE LAND, HEDLEY FRACTIONATION, ISOTOPIC DILUTION, COMMON GARDEN, P-FRACTIONS, CARBON, NITROGEN, AFFORESTATION, AVAILABILITY
journal title
OECOLOGIA
Oecologia
volume
169
issue
1
pages
221 - 234
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000302817700021
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.011 (2012)
JCR rank
37/135 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0029-8549
DOI
10.1007/s00442-011-2185-8
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2063759
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2063759
date created
2012-03-09 23:10:11
date last changed
2012-09-28 14:54:30
@article{2063759,
  abstract     = {Fertilisation of agricultural land causes an accumulation of nutrients in the top soil layer, among which phosphorus (P) is particularly persistent. Changing land use from farmland to forest affects soil properties, but changes in P pools have rarely been studied despite their importance to forest ecosystem development. Here, we describe the redistributions of the P pools in a four-decadal chronosequence of post-agricultural common oak (Quercus robur L.) forests in Belgium and Denmark. The aim was to assess whether forest age causes a repartitioning of P throughout the various soil P pools (labile P, slowly cycling P and occluded P); in particular, we addressed the time-related alterations in the inorganic versus organic P fractions. In less than 40 years of oak forest development, significant redistributions have occurred between different P fractions. While both the labile and the slowly cycling inorganic P fractions significantly decreased with forest age, the organic fractions significantly increased. The labile P pool (inorganic + organic), which is considered to be the pool of P most likely to contribute to plant-available P, significantly decreased with forest age (from {\textrangle} 20 to {\textlangle} 10\% of total P), except in the 0-5 cm of topsoil, where labile P remained persistently high. The shift from inorganic to organic P and the shifts between the different inorganic P fractions are driven by biological processes and also by physicochemical changes related to forest development. It is concluded that the organic labile P fraction, which is readily mineralisable, should be taken into account when studying the bioavailable P pool in forest ecosystems.},
  author       = {De Schrijver, An and Vesterdal, Lars and Hansen, Karin and De Frenne, Pieter and Augusto, Laurent and Achat, David Ludovick and Staelens, Jeroen and Baeten, Lander and De Keersmaeker, Luc and De Neve, Stefaan and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {0029-8549},
  journal      = {OECOLOGIA},
  keyword      = {Soil organic matter,Soil pH,Organic and inorganic P,Hedley fractionation,OAK QUERCUS-PETRAEA,FORMER ARABLE LAND,HEDLEY FRACTIONATION,ISOTOPIC DILUTION,COMMON GARDEN,P-FRACTIONS,CARBON,NITROGEN,AFFORESTATION,AVAILABILITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {221--234},
  title        = {Four decades of post-agricultural forest development have caused major redistributions of soil phosphorus fractions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-011-2185-8},
  volume       = {169},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
De Schrijver, An, Lars Vesterdal, Karin Hansen, Pieter De Frenne, Laurent Augusto, David Ludovick Achat, Jeroen Staelens, et al. 2012. “Four Decades of Post-agricultural Forest Development Have Caused Major Redistributions of Soil Phosphorus Fractions.” Oecologia 169 (1): 221–234.
APA
De Schrijver, An, Vesterdal, L., Hansen, K., De Frenne, P., Augusto, L., Achat, D. L., Staelens, J., et al. (2012). Four decades of post-agricultural forest development have caused major redistributions of soil phosphorus fractions. OECOLOGIA, 169(1), 221–234.
Vancouver
1.
De Schrijver A, Vesterdal L, Hansen K, De Frenne P, Augusto L, Achat DL, et al. Four decades of post-agricultural forest development have caused major redistributions of soil phosphorus fractions. OECOLOGIA. 2012;169(1):221–34.
MLA
De Schrijver, An, Lars Vesterdal, Karin Hansen, et al. “Four Decades of Post-agricultural Forest Development Have Caused Major Redistributions of Soil Phosphorus Fractions.” OECOLOGIA 169.1 (2012): 221–234. Print.